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Hypertensive disorder

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Elevated blood pressure; High blood pressure; Hypertension; Increased blood pressure; Systemic hypertension
SNOMED CT: Hypertensive disorder (38341003); HTN - Hypertension (38341003); Hypertensive disorder, systemic arterial (38341003); BP - High blood pressure (38341003); Systemic arterial hypertension (38341003); HBP - High blood pressure (38341003); HT - Hypertension (38341003); High blood pressure disorder (38341003); BP+ - Hypertension (38341003); High blood pressure (38341003); Hypertensive vascular disease (38341003); Hypertensive vascular degeneration (38341003); Hypertension (38341003)
 
HPO: HP:0000822
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0005044

Definition

The presence of chronic increased pressure in the systemic arterial system. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVHypertensive disorder

Conditions with this feature

Hb SS disease
MedGen UID:
287
Concept ID:
C0002895
Disease or Syndrome
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by intermittent vaso-occlusive events and chronic hemolytic anemia. Vaso-occlusive events result in tissue ischemia leading to acute and chronic pain as well as organ damage that can affect any organ system, including the bones, spleen, liver, brain, lungs, kidneys, and joints. Dactylitis (pain and/or swelling of the hands or feet) is often the earliest manifestation of SCD. In children, the spleen can become engorged with blood cells in a "splenic sequestration." The spleen is particularly vulnerable to infarction and the majority of individuals with SCD who are not on hydroxyurea or transfusion therapy become functionally asplenic in early childhood, increasing their risk for certain types of bacterial infections. Acute chest syndrome is a major cause of mortality in SCD. Chronic hemolysis can result in varying degrees of anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis, and delayed growth and sexual maturation. Individuals with the highest rates of hemolysis are predisposed to pulmonary artery hypertension, priapism, and leg ulcers but may be relatively protected from vaso-occlusive pain.
Fabry disease
MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesia), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhidrosis, hypohidrosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, they may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity may have: (1) a cardiac variant phenotype that usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia, and proteinuria, but without ESRD; or (2) a renal variant phenotype, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain; or (3) cerebrovascular disease presenting as stroke or transient ischemic attack.
Cushing syndrome
MedGen UID:
3681
Concept ID:
C0010481
Disease or Syndrome
Cushing's syndrome (CS) encompasses a group of hormonal disorders caused by prolonged and high exposure levels to glucocorticoids that can be of either endogenous (adrenal cortex production) or exogenous (iatrogenic) origin.
Familial dysautonomia
MedGen UID:
41678
Concept ID:
C0013364
Congenital Abnormality
Familial dysautonomia (FD) affects the development and survival of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons. It is a debilitating disease present from birth. Neuronal degeneration progresses throughout life. Affected individuals have gastrointestinal dysfunction, vomiting crises, recurrent pneumonia, altered sensitivity to pain and temperature perception, and cardiovascular instability. About 40% of individuals have autonomic crises. Hypotonia contributes to delay in acquisition of motor milestones. Older individuals often have a broad-based and ataxic gait that deteriorates over time. Life expectancy is decreased.
Berger disease
MedGen UID:
9032
Concept ID:
C0017661
Disease or Syndrome
End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a major public health problem, affecting 1 in 1,000 individuals and with an annual death rate of 20% despite dialysis treatment. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis, a principal cause of ESRD worldwide, affecting up to 1.3% of the population. Kidneys of patients with IgA nephropathy show deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes with proliferation of the glomerular mesangium. Typical clinical features include onset before age 40 with hematuria and proteinuria, and episodes of gross hematuria following mucosal infections are common; 30% of patients develop progressive renal failure. Although not generally considered a hereditary disease, striking ethnic variation in prevalence (Julian et al., 1985; D'Amico, 1987) and familial clustering (Scolari et al., 1999), along with subclinical renal abnormalities among relatives of cases, suggest a genetic component (Gharavi et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of IgA Nephropathy A locus for familial IgA nephropathy, called IGAN1, on chromosome 6q22-q23, was described by Gharavi et al. (2000). Another locus, IGAN2 (613944), was identified by Paterson et al. (2007) on chromosome 2q36. IGAN3 (616818) is caused by mutation in the SPRY2 gene (602466) on chromosome 13q31. Polymorphisms in the ACE (106180) and AGT (106150) genes have been associated with progression to chronic renal failure in patients with IgA nephropathy.
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Disease or Syndrome
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome
MedGen UID:
42458
Concept ID:
C0019562
Disease or Syndrome
Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is characterized by hemangioblastomas of the brain, spinal cord, and retina; renal cysts and clear cell renal cell carcinoma; pheochromocytoma, pancreatic cysts, and neuroendocrine tumors; endolymphatic sac tumors; and epididymal and broad ligament cysts. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas may be associated with headache, vomiting, gait disturbances, or ataxia. Spinal hemangioblastomas and related syrinx usually present with pain. Sensory and motor loss may develop with cord compression. Retinal hemangioblastomas may be the initial manifestation of VHL syndrome and can cause vision loss. Renal cell carcinoma occurs in about 70% of individuals with VHL and is the leading cause of mortality. Pheochromocytomas can be asymptomatic but may cause sustained or episodic hypertension. Pancreatic lesions often remain asymptomatic and rarely cause endocrine or exocrine insufficiency. Endolymphatic sac tumors can cause hearing loss of varying severity, which can be a presenting symptom. Cystadenomas of the epididymis are relatively common. They rarely cause problems, unless bilateral, in which case they may result in infertility.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 2a
MedGen UID:
9958
Concept ID:
C0025268
Neoplastic Process
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) includes the following phenotypes: MEN 2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, which may be a variant of MEN 2A), and MEN 2B. All three phenotypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN 2A and MEN 2B involve an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN 2A involves an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN 2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and a marfanoid habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN 2B, early adulthood in MEN 2A, and middle age in FMTC.
Neuroblastoma
MedGen UID:
18012
Concept ID:
C0027819
Neoplastic Process
ALK-related neuroblastic tumor susceptibility is characterized by increased risk for neuroblastic tumors including neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma. Neuroblastoma is a more malignant tumor and ganglioneuroma a more benign tumor. Depending on the histologic findings, ganglioneuroblastoma can behave in a more aggressive fashion, like neuroblastoma, or in a benign fashion, like ganglioneuroma. Preliminary data from the ten reported families with ALK-related neuroblastic tumor susceptibility suggest an overall penetrance of approximately 57% with the risk for neuroblastic tumor development highest in infancy and decreasing by late childhood.
Neurofibromatosis, type 1
MedGen UID:
18013
Concept ID:
C0027831
Neoplastic Process
Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is characterized by multiple café au lait spots, axillary and inguinal freckling, multiple cutaneous neurofibromas, iris Lisch nodules, and choroidal freckling. About half of people with NF1 have plexiform neurofibromas, but most are internal and not suspected clinically. Learning disabilities are present in at least 50% of individuals with NF1. Less common but potentially more serious manifestations include optic nerve and other central nervous system gliomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, scoliosis, tibial dysplasia, and vasculopathy.
Preeclampsia
MedGen UID:
18608
Concept ID:
C0032914
Pathologic Function
Preeclampsia, which along with chronic hypertension and gestational hypertension comprise the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, is characterized by new hypertension (blood pressure 140/90 or greater) presenting after 20 weeks' gestation with clinically relevant proteinuria. Preeclampsia is 1 of the top 4 causes of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide (summary by Payne et al., 2011). Preeclampsia is otherwise known as gestational proteinuric hypertension (Davey and MacGillivray, 1988). A high proportion of patients with preeclampsia have glomerular endotheliosis, the unique histopathologic feature of the condition (Fisher et al., 1981). A distinct form of severe preeclampsia is characterized by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome) (Brown et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Preeclampsia/Eclampsia Susceptibility loci for preeclampsia/eclampsia include PEE1 on chromosome 2p13, PEE2 (609402) on chromosome 2p25, and PEE3 (609403) on chromosome 9p13. PEE4 (609404) is caused by mutation in the STOX1 gene (609397) on chromosome 10q22. PEE5 (614595) is caused by mutation in the CORIN gene (605236) on chromosome 4p12. An association with PEE has been found with the EPHX1 gene (132810) on chromosome 1q.
Benign intracranial hypertension
MedGen UID:
18732
Concept ID:
C0033845
Disease or Syndrome
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a neurological disorder characterized by isolated increased intracranial pressure manifesting with recurrent and persistent headaches, nausea, vomiting, progressive and transient obstruction of the visual field, papilledema. Visual loss can be irreversible.
Pseudoxanthoma elasticum
MedGen UID:
18733
Concept ID:
C0033847
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic disorder that affects the elastic tissue of the skin, the eye, and vascular system. Individuals most commonly present with angioid streaks of the retina found on routine eye examination or associated with retinal hemorrhage and/or characteristic papules in the skin. The most frequent cause of morbidity and disability in PXE is reduced vision due to complications of subretinal neovascularizations and macular atrophy. Other manifestations include premature gastrointestinal angina and/or bleeding, intermittent claudication of arm and leg muscles, stroke, renovascular hypertension, and cardiovascular complications (angina/myocardial infarction). Most affected individuals live a normal life span.
Stiff-man syndrome
MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder.
Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease
MedGen UID:
39076
Concept ID:
C0085548
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) belongs to a group of congenital hepatorenal fibrocystic syndromes and is a cause of significant renal and liver-related morbidity and mortality in children. The majority of individuals with ARPKD present in the neonatal period with enlarged echogenic kidneys. Renal disease is characterized by nephromegaly, hypertension, and varying degrees of renal dysfunction. More than 50% of affected individuals with ARPKD progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within the first decade of life; ESRD may require kidney transplantation. Pulmonary hypoplasia resulting from oligohydramnios occurs in a number of affected infants. Approximately 30% of these infants die in the neonatal period or within the first year of life from respiratory insufficiency or superimposed pulmonary infections. With neonatal respiratory support and renal replacement therapies, the long-term survival of these infants has improved to greater than 80%. As advances in renal replacement therapy and kidney transplantation improve long-term survival, it is likely that clinical hepatobiliary disease will become a major feature of the natural history of ARPKD. In addition, a subset of individuals with this disorder are identified with hepatosplenomegaly; the renal disease is often mild and may be discovered incidentally during imaging studies of the abdomen. Approximately 50% of infants will have clinical evidence of liver involvement at diagnosis although histologic hepatic fibrosis is invariably present at birth. This can lead to progressive portal hypertension with resulting esophageal or gastric varices, enlarged hemorrhoids, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein-losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Other hepatic findings include nonobstructed dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts (Caroli syndrome) and dilatation of the common bile duct, which may lead to recurrent or persistent bacterial ascending cholangitis due to dilated bile ducts and stagnant bile flow. An increasing number of affected individuals surviving the neonatal period will eventually require portosystemic shunting or liver transplantation for complications of portal hypertension or cholangitis. The classic neonatal presentation of ARPKD notwithstanding, there is significant variability in age and presenting clinical symptoms related to the relative degree of renal and biliary abnormalities.
Hereditary coproporphyria
MedGen UID:
57931
Concept ID:
C0162531
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility.
Acute intermittent porphyria
MedGen UID:
56452
Concept ID:
C0162565
Disease or Syndrome
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant disorder, occurs in heterozygotes for an HMBS pathogenic variant that causes reduced activity of the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. AIP is considered "overt" in a heterozygote who was previously or is currently symptomatic; AIP is considered "latent" in a heterozygote who has never had symptoms, and typically has been identified during molecular genetic testing of at-risk family members. Note that GeneReviews does not use the term "carrier" for an individual who is heterozygous for an autosomal dominant pathogenic variant; GeneReviews reserves the term "carrier" for an individual who is heterozygous for an autosomal recessive disorder and thus is not expected to ever develop manifestations of the disorder. Overt AIP is characterized clinically by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks of severe abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, and hypertension. Attacks may be complicated by neurologic findings (mental changes, convulsions, and peripheral neuropathy that may progress to respiratory paralysis), and hyponatremia. Acute attacks, which may be provoked by certain drugs, alcoholic beverages, endocrine factors, calorie restriction, stress, and infections, usually resolve within two weeks. Most individuals with AIP have one or a few attacks; about 3%-8% (mainly women) have recurrent attacks (defined as >3 attacks/year) that may persist for years. Other long-term complications are chronic renal failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and hypertension. Attacks, which are very rare before puberty, are more common in women than men. Latent AIP. While all individuals heterozygous for an HMBS pathogenic variant that predisposes to AIP are at risk of developing overt AIP, most have latent AIP and never have symptoms.
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS syndrome, comprising mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with a variable clinical phenotype. The disorder is accompanied by features of central nervous system involvement, including seizures, hemiparesis, hemianopsia, cortical blindness, and episodic vomiting (Pavlakis et al., 1984; Montagna et al., 1988). Other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies include Leigh syndrome (LS; 256000), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS; 530000), MERRF syndrome (545000), and Leber optic atrophy (535000).
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to poor weight gain in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
Liddle syndrome
MedGen UID:
67439
Concept ID:
C0221043
Disease or Syndrome
Liddle syndrome is an inherited form of high blood pressure (hypertension). This condition is characterized by severe hypertension that begins unusually early in life, often in childhood, although some affected individuals are not diagnosed until adulthood. Some people with Liddle syndrome have no additional signs or symptoms, especially in childhood. Over time, however, untreated hypertension can lead to heart disease or stroke, which may be fatal.\n\nIn addition to hypertension, affected individuals can have low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia). Signs and symptoms of hypokalemia include muscle weakness or pain, fatigue, constipation, or heart palpitations. The shortage of potassium can also raise the pH of the blood, a condition known as metabolic alkalosis.
Pituitary dependent hypercortisolism
MedGen UID:
66381
Concept ID:
C0221406
Disease or Syndrome
AIP familial isolated pituitary adenoma (AIP-FIPA) is defined as the presence of an AIP germline pathogenic variant in an individual with a pituitary adenoma (regardless of family history). The most commonly occurring pituitary adenomas in this disorder are growth hormone-secreting adenomas (somatotropinoma), followed by prolactin-secreting adenomas (prolactinoma), growth hormone and prolactin co-secreting adenomas (somatomammotropinoma), and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). Rarely TSH-secreting adenomas (thyrotropinomas) are observed. Clinical findings result from excess hormone secretion, lack of hormone secretion, and/or mass effects (e.g., headaches, visual field loss). Within the same family, pituitary adenomas can be of the same or different type. Age of onset in AIP-FIPA is usually in the second or third decade.
Marshall-Smith syndrome
MedGen UID:
75551
Concept ID:
C0265211
Disease or Syndrome
The Marshall-Smith syndrome is a malformation syndrome characterized by accelerated skeletal maturation, relative failure to thrive, respiratory difficulties, mental retardation, and unusual facies, including prominent forehead, shallow orbits, blue sclerae, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia (Adam et al., 2005).
Glucose-6-phosphate transport defect
MedGen UID:
78644
Concept ID:
C0268146
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys, resulting in hepatomegaly and renomegaly. The two subtypes (GSDIa and GSDIb) are clinically indistinguishable. Some untreated neonates present with severe hypoglycemia; more commonly, however, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and/or hypoglycemic seizures. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with fat cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis. Untreated GSDIb is associated with impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia after the first few years of life, all of which result in recurrent bacterial infections and oral and intestinal mucosal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include growth retardation resulting in short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, renal disease, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignant transformation, polycystic ovaries, pancreatitis, and changes in brain function. Normal growth and puberty is expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
Deficiency of steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase
MedGen UID:
82782
Concept ID:
C0268285
Disease or Syndrome
17 alpha(a)-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is a condition that affects the function of certain hormone-producing glands called the gonads (ovaries in females and testes in males) and the adrenal glands. The gonads direct sexual development before birth and during puberty and are important for reproduction. The adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys, regulate the production of certain hormones, including those that control salt levels in the body. People with 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency have an imbalance of many of the hormones that are made in these glands. 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is one of a group of disorders, known as congenital adrenal hyperplasias, that impair hormone production and disrupt sexual development and maturation.\n\nHormone imbalances lead to the characteristic signs and symptoms of 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which include high blood pressure (hypertension), low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia), and abnormal sexual development. The severity of the features varies. Two forms of the condition are recognized: complete 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which is more severe, and partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which is typically less so.\n\nMales and females are affected by disruptions to sexual development differently. Females (who have two X chromosomes) with 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency are born with normal external female genitalia; however, the internal reproductive organs, including the uterus and ovaries, may be underdeveloped. Women with complete 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency do not develop secondary sex characteristics, such as breasts and pubic hair, and do not menstruate (amenorrhea). Women with partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency may develop some secondary sex characteristics; menstruation is typically irregular or absent. Either form of the disorder results in an inability to conceive a baby (infertility).\n\nIn affected individuals who are chromosomally male (having an X and a Y chromosome), problems with sexual development lead to abnormalities of the external genitalia. The most severely affected are born with characteristically female external genitalia and are generally raised as females. However, because they do not have female internal reproductive organs, these individuals have amenorrhea and do not develop female secondary sex characteristics. These individuals have testes, but they are abnormally located in the abdomen (undescended). Sometimes, complete 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency leads to external genitalia that do not look clearly male or clearly female (ambiguous genitalia). Males with partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency usually have abnormal male genitalia, such as a small penis (micropenis), the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias), or a scrotum divided into two lobes (bifid scrotum). Males with either complete or partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency are also infertile.
Deficiency of steroid 11-beta-monooxygenase
MedGen UID:
82783
Concept ID:
C0268292
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of corticosteroid biosynthesis resulting in androgen excess, virilization, and hypertension. The defect causes decreased synthesis of cortisol and corticosterone in the zona fasciculata of the adrenal gland, resulting in accumulation of the precursors 11-deoxycortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone; the latter is a potent salt-retaining mineralocorticoid that leads to arterial hypertension (White et al., 1991). CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for approximately 5 to 8% of all CAH cases; approximately 90% of cases are caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency (201910) (White et al., 1991).
Familial visceral amyloidosis, Ostertag type
MedGen UID:
82799
Concept ID:
C0268389
Disease or Syndrome
A group of rare renal diseases, characterized by amyloid fibril deposition of apolipoprotein A-I or A-II (AApoAI or AApoAII amyloidosis), lysozyme (ALys amyloidosis) or fibrinogen A-alpha chain (AFib amyloidosis) in one or several organs. Renal involvement leading to chronic renal disease and renal failure is a common sign. Additional manifestations depend on the organ involved and the type of amyloid fibrils deposited.
Alstrom syndrome
MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, acute infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and/or adolescent- or adult-onset restrictive cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance / type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and chronic progressive kidney disease. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals and may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to T2DM in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia. Other findings can include endocrine abnormalities (hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, and hyperandrogenism in females), urologic dysfunction / detrusor instability, progressive decrease in renal function, and hepatic disease (ranging from elevated transaminases to steatohepatitis/NAFLD). Approximately 20% of affected individuals have delay in early developmental milestones, most commonly in gross and fine motor skills. About 30% have a learning disability. Cognitive impairment (IQ <70) is very rare. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family.
Rowley-Rosenberg syndrome
MedGen UID:
120638
Concept ID:
C0268426
Disease or Syndrome
Idiopathic livedo reticularis with systemic involvement
MedGen UID:
76449
Concept ID:
C0282492
Disease or Syndrome
Sneddon syndrome is a noninflammatory arteriopathy characterized by onset of livedo reticularis in the second decade and onset of cerebrovascular disease in early adulthood (summary by Bras et al., 2014). Livedo reticularis occurs also with polyarteritis nodosa, systemic lupus erythematosus, and central thrombocythemia, any one of which may be accompanied by cerebrovascular accidents (Bruyn et al., 1987).
Trimethylaminuria
MedGen UID:
83350
Concept ID:
C0342739
Disease or Syndrome
Primary trimethylaminuria is characterized by a fishy odor resembling that of rotten or decaying fish that results from excess excretion of trimethylamine in the urine, breath, sweat, and reproductive fluids. No physical symptoms are associated with trimethylaminuria. Affected individuals appear normal and healthy; however, the unpleasant odor often results in social and psychological problems. Symptoms are usually present from birth and may worsen during puberty. In females, symptoms are more severe just before and during menstruation, after taking oral contraceptives, and around the time of menopause.
Phosphate transport defect
MedGen UID:
87455
Concept ID:
C0342749
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogenosis due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P) type b, or glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1b, is a type of glycogenosis due to G6P deficiency (see this term).
Glutaryl-CoA oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
87464
Concept ID:
C0342873
Disease or Syndrome
Glutaric aciduria III is characterized by an isolated accumulation of glutaric acid. It appears to be a 'non-disease' as it is found in healthy individuals and is associated with inconsistent symptoms in others (summary by Marlaire et al., 2014).
Congenital livedo reticularis
MedGen UID:
83381
Concept ID:
C0345419
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital vascular malformation that presents as localized or generalized erythematous-telangiectatic lesions with a reticular pattern; the lesions are almost always present at birth or develop in the first days of life. Cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (CMTC) appears as marble-like pattern (mottling) on the surface of the skin. In contrast to cutis marmorata, the marbling is more severe and always visible.
Progressive hereditary glomerulonephritis without deafness
MedGen UID:
98012
Concept ID:
C0403443
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic hypertension characterized by an adult onset of increased blood pressure associated with nephropathy progressing to end-stage renal disease. Renal biopsy may show interstitial fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis and mild tubular atrophy. Increased serum creatinine and proteinuria have also been reported.
Glomerulopathy with fibronectin deposits 1
MedGen UID:
98017
Concept ID:
C0403557
Disease or Syndrome
Glomerulopathy with fibronectin deposits (GFND) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and hypertension that leads to end-stage renal failure in the second to fifth decade of life. Pathologic examination shows enlarged glomeruli with mesangial and subendothelial fibrillary deposits that show strong immunoreactivity to fibronectin (FN1; 135600) (Castelletti et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Glomerulopathy with Fibronectin Deposits The GFND1 locus maps to chromosome 1q32. See also GFND2 (601894), which is caused by mutation in the FN1 gene (135600) on chromosome 2q35.
Metabolic syndrome X
MedGen UID:
99356
Concept ID:
C0524620
Disease or Syndrome
A clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose levels is sometimes called metabolic syndrome X (Reaven, 1988) or abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome (Bjorntorp, 1991). The syndrome may affect nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults and is considered a veritable epidemic (Ford et al., 2002). It is a major risk factor for both diabetes mellitus (see 125853 and Haffner et al., 1992) and cardiovascular disease (Isomaa et al., 2001). The etiology is complex, determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence varies substantially among ethnic groups, with the highest rates in Mexican American women (Park et al., 2003). Other factors influencing the metabolic syndrome include age, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical inactivity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome AOMS2 (605572) has been mapped to chromosome 17p12. AOMS3 (615812) is caused by mutation in the DYRK1B gene (604556) on chromosome 19q13. AOMS4 (618620) is caused by mutation in the CELA2A gene (609443) on chromosome 1p36.
Cockayne syndrome B
MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a continuous phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal (COFS) syndrome; CS type III, a milder and later-onset form; COFS syndrome, a fetal form of CS. CS type I is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age five years. CS type III is a phenotype in which major clinical features associated with CS only become apparent after age two years; growth and/or cognition exceeds the expectations for CS type I. COFS syndrome is characterized by very severe prenatal developmental anomalies (arthrogryposis and microphthalmia).
Cockayne syndrome type A
MedGen UID:
155488
Concept ID:
C0751039
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a continuous phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal (COFS) syndrome; CS type III, a milder and later-onset form; COFS syndrome, a fetal form of CS. CS type I is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age five years. CS type III is a phenotype in which major clinical features associated with CS only become apparent after age two years; growth and/or cognition exceeds the expectations for CS type I. COFS syndrome is characterized by very severe prenatal developmental anomalies (arthrogryposis and microphthalmia).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome
MedGen UID:
156019
Concept ID:
C0752166
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a disorder that affects many parts of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family.\n\nVision loss is one of the major features of Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Loss of vision occurs as the light-sensing tissue at the back of the eye (the retina) gradually deteriorates. Problems with night vision become apparent by mid-childhood, followed by blind spots that develop in the side (peripheral) vision. Over time, these blind spots enlarge and merge to produce tunnel vision. Most people with Bardet-Biedl syndrome also develop blurred central vision (poor visual acuity) and become legally blind by adolescence or early adulthood.\n\nObesity is another characteristic feature of Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Abnormal weight gain typically begins in early childhood and continues to be an issue throughout life. Complications of obesity can include type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension), and abnormally high cholesterol levels (hypercholesterolemia).\n\nOther major signs and symptoms of Bardet-Biedl syndrome include the presence of extra fingers or toes (polydactyly), intellectual disability or learning problems, and abnormalities of the genitalia. Most affected males produce reduced amounts of sex hormones (hypogonadism), and they are usually unable to father biological children (infertile). Many people with Bardet-Biedl syndrome also have kidney abnormalities, which can be serious or life-threatening.\n\nAdditional features of Bardet-Biedl syndrome can include impaired speech, delayed development of motor skills such as standing and walking, behavioral problems such as emotional immaturity and inappropriate outbursts, and clumsiness or poor coordination. Distinctive facial features, dental abnormalities, unusually short or fused fingers or toes, and a partial or complete loss of the sense of smell (anosmia) have also been reported in some people with Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Additionally, this condition can affect the heart, liver, and digestive system.
Myhre syndrome
MedGen UID:
167103
Concept ID:
C0796081
Disease or Syndrome
Myhre syndrome is a connective tissue disorder with multisystem involvement, progressive and proliferative fibrosis that may occur spontaneously or following trauma or surgery, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and in some instances, autistic-like behaviors. Organ systems primarily involved include: cardiovascular (congenital heart defects, long- and short-segment stenosis of the aorta and peripheral arteries, pericardial effusion, constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and hypertension); respiratory (choanal stenosis, laryngotracheal narrowing, obstructive airway disease, or restrictive pulmonary disease), gastrointestinal (pyloric stenosis, duodenal strictures, severe constipation); and skin (thickened particularly on the hands and extensor surfaces). Additional findings include distinctive craniofacial features and skeletal involvement (intrauterine growth restriction, short stature, limited joint range of motion). To date, 55 individuals with molecularly confirmed Myhre syndrome have been reported.
Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia
MedGen UID:
164078
Concept ID:
C0877024
Congenital Abnormality
Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) resulting in short stature, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. Radiographic manifestations of SED include ovoid and mildly flattened vertebral bodies, small deformed capital femoral epiphyses, and shallow dysplastic acetabular fossae. Adult height is 136-157 cm for men and 98.5-143 cm for women. Nearly all affected individuals have progressive steroid-resistant nephropathy, usually developing within five years of the diagnosis of growth failure and terminating with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The majority of tested individuals have T-cell deficiency and an associated risk for opportunistic infection, a common cause of death. SIOD involves a spectrum that ranges from an infantile or severe early-onset form with death early in life to a juvenile or milder later-onset form with survival into adulthood if renal disease is appropriately treated.
Drash syndrome
MedGen UID:
181980
Concept ID:
C0950121
Disease or Syndrome
WT1 disorder is characterized by congenital/infantile or childhood onset of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), a progressive glomerulopathy that does not respond to standard steroid therapy. Additional common findings can include disorders of testicular development (with or without abnormalities of the external genitalia and/or müllerian structures) and Wilms tumor. Less common findings are congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and gonadoblastoma. While various combinations of renal and other findings associated with a WT1 pathogenic variant were designated as certain syndromes in the past, those designations are now recognized to be part of a phenotypic continuum and are no longer clinically helpful.
Hyperaldosteronism, familial, type I
MedGen UID:
224694
Concept ID:
C1260386
Disease or Syndrome
Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypertension, variable hyperaldosteronism, and abnormal adrenal steroid production, including 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol (Lifton et al., 1992). There is significant phenotypic heterogeneity, and some individuals never develop hypertension (Stowasser et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Hyperaldosteronism Familial hyperaldosteronism type II (HALD2; 605635) is caused by mutation in the CLCN2 gene (600570) on chromosome 3q27. Familial hyperaldosteronism type III (HALD3; 613677) is caused by mutation in the KCNJ5 gene (600734) on chromosome 11q24. Familial hyperaldosteronism type IV (HALD4; 617027) is caused by mutation in the CACNA1H gene (607904) on chromosome 16p13.
Orofaciodigital syndrome I
MedGen UID:
307142
Concept ID:
C1510460
Disease or Syndrome
Oral-facial-digital syndrome type I (OFD1) is usually male lethal during gestation and predominantly affects females. OFD1 is characterized by the following features: Oral (lobulated tongue, tongue nodules, cleft of the hard or soft palate, accessory gingival frenulae, hypodontia, and other dental abnormalities). Facial (widely spaced eyes or telecanthus, hypoplasia of the alae nasi, median cleft or pseudocleft upper lip, micrognathia). Digital (brachydactyly, syndactyly, clinodactyly of the fifth finger; duplicated hallux [great toe]). Kidney (polycystic kidney disease). Brain (e.g., intracerebral cysts, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar agenesis with or without Dandy-Walker malformation). Intellectual disability (in ~50% of individuals).
Renal hypodysplasia/aplasia 1
MedGen UID:
301437
Concept ID:
C1619700
Congenital Abnormality
Renal hypodysplasia/aplasia belongs to a group of perinatally lethal renal diseases, including bilateral renal aplasia, unilateral renal agenesis with contralateral dysplasia (URA/RD), and severe obstructive uropathy. Renal aplasia falls at the most severe end of the spectrum of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT; 610805), and usually results in death in utero or in the perinatal period. Families have been documented in which bilateral renal agenesis or aplasia coexists with unilateral renal aplasia, renal dysplasia, or renal aplasia with renal dysplasia, suggesting that these conditions may belong to a pathogenic continuum or phenotypic spectrum (summary by Joss et al., 2003; Humbert et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Renal Hypodysplasia/Aplasia RHDA2 (615721) is caused by mutation in the FGF20 gene (605558) on chromosome 8p22, and RHDA3 (617805) is caused by mutation in the GREB1L gene (617782) on chromosome 18q11.
Familial partial lipodystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
318591
Concept ID:
C1720859
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy type 1 (FPLD1), or Kobberling-type lipodystrophy, is characterized by loss of adipose tissue confined to the extremities, with normal or increased distribution of fat on the face, neck, and trunk (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Familial partial lipodystrophy 2
MedGen UID:
354526
Concept ID:
C1720860
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution beginning in late childhood or early adult life. Affected individuals gradually lose fat from the upper and lower extremities and the gluteal and truncal regions, resulting in a muscular appearance with prominent superficial veins. In some patients, adipose tissue accumulates on the face and neck, causing a double chin, fat neck, or cushingoid appearance. Metabolic abnormalities include insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosis nigricans and hypertriglyceridemia; hirsutism and menstrual abnormalities occur infrequently. Familial partial lipodystrophy may also be referred to as lipoatrophic diabetes mellitus, but the essential feature is loss of subcutaneous fat (review by Garg, 2004). The disorder may be misdiagnosed as Cushing disease (see 219080) (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986; Garg, 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy Familial partial lipodystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Types 1 and 2 were originally described as clinical subtypes: type 1 (FPLD1; 608600), characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat confined to the limbs (Kobberling et al., 1975), and FPLD2, characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat from the limbs and trunk (Dunnigan et al., 1974; Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). No genetic basis for FPLD1 has yet been delineated. FPLD3 (604367) is caused by mutation in the PPARG gene (601487) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD4 (613877) is caused by mutation in the PLIN1 gene (170290) on chromosome 15q26; FPLD5 (615238) is caused by mutation in the CIDEC gene (612120) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD6 (615980) is caused by mutation in the LIPE gene (151750) on chromosome 19q13; and FPLD7 (606721) is caused by mutation in the CAV1 gene (601047) on chromosome 7q31.
Familial partial lipodystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
328393
Concept ID:
C1720861
Disease or Syndrome
Researchers have described at least six forms of familial partial lipodystrophy, which are distinguished by their genetic cause. The most common form of familial partial lipodystrophy is type 2, also called Dunnigan disease. In addition to the signs and symptoms described above, some people with this type of the disorder develop muscle weakness (myopathy), abnormalities of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), a form of heart disease called coronary artery disease, and problems with the electrical system that coordinates the heartbeat (the conduction system).\n\nMost people with familial partial lipodystrophy also have high levels of fats called triglycerides circulating in the bloodstream (hypertriglyceridemia), which can lead to inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Familial partial lipodystrophy can also cause an abnormal buildup of fats in the liver (hepatic steatosis), which can result in an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly) and abnormal liver function. After puberty, some affected females develop multiple cysts on the ovaries, an increased amount of body hair (hirsutism), and an inability to conceive (infertility), which are likely related to hormonal changes.\n\nAbnormal storage of fat in the body can lead to health problems in adulthood. Many people with familial partial lipodystrophy develop insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's tissues cannot adequately respond to insulin, which is a hormone that normally helps to regulate blood sugar levels. Insulin resistance may worsen to become a more serious disease called diabetes mellitus. Some people with familial partial lipodystrophy develop acanthosis nigricans, a skin condition related to high levels of insulin in the bloodstream. Acanthosis nigricans causes the skin in body folds and creases to become thick, dark, and velvety.\n\nFamilial partial lipodystrophy is a rare condition characterized by an abnormal distribution of fatty (adipose) tissue. Adipose tissue is normally found in many parts of the body, including beneath the skin and surrounding the internal organs. It stores fat as a source of energy and also provides cushioning. In people with familial partial lipodystrophy, adipose tissue is lost from the arms, legs, and hips, giving these parts of the body a very muscular appearance. The fat that cannot be stored in the limbs builds up around the face and neck, and inside the abdomen. Excess fat in these areas gives individuals an appearance described as "cushingoid," because it resembles the physical features associated with a hormonal disorder called Cushing disease. This abnormal fat distribution can begin anytime from childhood to adulthood.
Osteochondrodysplasia, rhizomelic, with callosal agenesis, thrombocytopenia, hydrocephalus, and hypertension
MedGen UID:
322254
Concept ID:
C1833688
Disease or Syndrome
Telangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagic, type 2
MedGen UID:
324960
Concept ID:
C1838163
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are most evident on the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, face, chest, and fingers. The average age of onset is generally later than epistaxis, but may be during childhood. Large AVMs often cause symptoms when they occur in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. Approximately 25% of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which most commonly begins after age 50 years.
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2A
MedGen UID:
327088
Concept ID:
C1840389
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described.
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2B
MedGen UID:
374457
Concept ID:
C1840390
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described.
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2C
MedGen UID:
327089
Concept ID:
C1840391
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described.
Glucocorticoid resistance, generalized
MedGen UID:
333960
Concept ID:
C1841972
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized glucocorticoid resistance is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased plasma cortisol concentration and high urinary free cortisol, resistance to adrenal suppression by dexamethasone, and the absence of clinical stigmata of Cushing syndrome. The clinical expression of the disease is variable. Common features include hypoglycemia, hypertension, and metabolic alkalosis. In females, overproduction of adrenal androgens has been associated with infertility, male-pattern baldness, hirsutism, and menstrual irregularities. Other features include chronic fatigue and profound anxiety (summary by Chrousos et al., 1983; Donner et al., 2013).
Vater-like defects with pulmonary hypertension, laryngeal webs, and growth deficiency
MedGen UID:
333986
Concept ID:
C1842082
Disease or Syndrome
Braddock syndrome is a rare malformation syndrome with multiple congenital abnormalities, described in 2 siblings, that is characterized by VACTERL -like association in combination with pulmonary hypertension, laryngeal webs, blue sclerae, abnormal ears, persistent growth deficiency and normal intellect.
Coronary artery disease, autosomal dominant, 1
MedGen UID:
330802
Concept ID:
C1842247
Disease or Syndrome
Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its most important complication, acute myocardial infarction (MI), are leading causes of death and disability in the developed world. Multiple risk factors for CAD/MI have been identified, including family history, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, smoking, and diabetes. Several genomewide scans of affected sib pairs have identified susceptibility loci for CAD, e.g., 607339 and 300464.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
335850
Concept ID:
C1842982
Finding
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic entity associated clinically with proteinuria, the nephrotic syndrome (NPHS), and progressive loss of renal function. It is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (Meyrier, 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome, see FSGS1 (603278).
Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome
MedGen UID:
377668
Concept ID:
C1852406
Disease or Syndrome
Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome (BSTVS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by the furrowed skin disorder of cutis gyrata, acanthosis nigricans, craniosynostosis, craniofacial dysmorphism, digital anomalies, umbilical and anogenital abnormalities, and early death (summary by Przylepa et al., 1996).
Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis
MedGen UID:
343814
Concept ID:
C1852456
Disease or Syndrome
Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is a rare multisystem disease characterized by the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum, manifested clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgia.
Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency
MedGen UID:
343831
Concept ID:
C1852529
Disease or Syndrome
Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency is a condition with subtle signs and symptoms, the most frequent being extreme tiredness (fatigue), especially after physical exertion. Many people with this condition have unusually low blood pressure (hypotension). Some affected individuals have a fatty liver or experience chronic pain, particularly in their muscles. These features vary among affected individuals, even those within the same family.\n\nMany people with corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency have only one or two of these features; others have no signs and symptoms of the disorder and are only diagnosed after a relative is found to be affected.\n\nSome people with corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency also have a condition called chronic fatigue syndrome. The features of chronic fatigue syndrome are prolonged fatigue that interferes with daily activities, as well as general symptoms, such as sore throat or headaches.
Hyperaldosteronism, familial, type II
MedGen UID:
340137
Concept ID:
C1854107
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hyperaldosteronism type II is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypertension due to increased aldosterone, often with hypokalemia. Patients usually present before age 20 years, although some may present in infancy. The disorder shows incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity; some patients may have normal blood pressure but have an increased aldosterone:renin ratio (ARR) on laboratory testing. Spironolactone is an effective treatment (summary by Scholl et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hyperaldosteronism, see HALD1 (103900).
Abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome quantitative trait locus 2
MedGen UID:
344224
Concept ID:
C1854170
Finding
Hypertension, early-onset, autosomal dominant, with severe exacerbation in pregnancy
MedGen UID:
343170
Concept ID:
C1854631
Disease or Syndrome
Hypertension due to gain-of-function mutations in the mineralocorticoid receptor is a rare genetic hypertension characterized by a familial severe hypertension with an onset before age 20 years, associated with suppressed plasma renin and low aldosterone levels in the presence of low or normal levels of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone, that is highly resistant to antihypertensive medication. During pregnancy, there is a marked exacerbation of hypertension, accompanied by low serum potassium levels and undetectable aldosterone levels, but without signs of preeclampsia, requiring early delivery.
Keutel syndrome
MedGen UID:
383722
Concept ID:
C1855607
Disease or Syndrome
Keutel syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple peripheral pulmonary stenoses, brachytelephalangy, inner ear deafness, and abnormal cartilage ossification or calcification (summary by Khosroshahi et al., 2014).
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 1
MedGen UID:
347456
Concept ID:
C1857451
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an endogenous form of adrenal Cushing syndrome characterized by multiple bilateral adrenocortical nodules that cause a striking enlargement of the adrenal glands. Although some familial cases have been reported, the vast majority of AIMAH cases are sporadic. Patients typically present in the fifth and sixth decades of life, approximately 10 years later than most patients with other causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). Approximately 10 to 15% of adrenal Cushing syndrome is due to primary bilateral ACTH-independent adrenocortical pathology. The 2 main subtypes are AIMAH and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, see 610489), which is often a component of the Carney complex (160980) and associated with mutations in the PRKAR1A gene (188830) on chromosome 17q23-q24. AIMAH is rare, representing less than 1% of endogenous causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). See also ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (615830) due to somatic mutation in the PRKACA gene (601639). Cushing 'disease' (219090) is an ACTH-dependent disorder caused in most cases by pituitary adenomas that secrete excessive ACTH. Genetic Heterogeneity of ACTH-Independent Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia AIMAH2 (615954) is caused by germline mutation of 1 allele of the ARMC5 gene (615549) coupled with a somatic mutation in the other allele.
Alagille syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
341844
Concept ID:
C1857761
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical variability; this variability is seen even among individuals from the same family. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, cholestasis, congenital cardiac defects (primarily involving the pulmonary arteries), butterfly vertebrae, ophthalmologic abnormalities (most commonly posterior embryotoxon), and characteristic facial features. Renal abnormalities, growth failure, developmental delays, splenomegaly, and vascular abnormalities may also occur.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 2
MedGen UID:
349053
Concept ID:
C1858915
Disease or Syndrome
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic entity associated clinically with proteinuria, the nephrotic syndrome (NPHS), and progressive loss of renal function. It is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (review by Meyrier, 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome (NPHS), see FSGS1 (603278).
Arteriosclerosis, severe juvenile
MedGen UID:
395330
Concept ID:
C1859725
Disease or Syndrome
Arterial tortuosity syndrome
MedGen UID:
347942
Concept ID:
C1859726
Disease or Syndrome
Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is characterized by widespread elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and mid-sized arteries as well as focal stenosis of segments of the pulmonary arteries and/or aorta combined with findings of a generalized connective tissue disorder, which may include soft or doughy hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility, inguinal hernia, and diaphragmatic hernia. Skeletal findings include pectus excavatum or carinatum, arachnodactyly, scoliosis, knee/elbow contractures, and camptodactyly. The cardiovascular system is the major source of morbidity and mortality with increased risk at any age for aneurysm formation and dissection both at the aortic root and throughout the arterial tree, and for ischemic vascular events involving cerebrovascular circulation (resulting in non-hemorrhagic stroke) and the abdominal arteries (resulting in infarctions of abdominal organs).
Angiomatosis, diffuse corticomeningeal, of Divry and van Bogaert
MedGen UID:
347234
Concept ID:
C1859783
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cirrhosis
MedGen UID:
350049
Concept ID:
C1861556
Disease or Syndrome
Brachydactyly-arterial hypertension syndrome
MedGen UID:
349445
Concept ID:
C1862170
Disease or Syndrome
The hypertension and brachydactyly syndrome is characterized by brachydactyly type E, severe salt-independent but age-dependent hypertension, an increased fibroblast growth rate, neurovascular contact at the rostral-ventrolateral medulla, altered baroreflex blood pressure regulation, and death from stroke before age 50 years when untreated (summary by Maass et al., 2015).
Arteritis, familial granulomatous, with juvenile polyarthritis
MedGen UID:
349529
Concept ID:
C1862510
Disease or Syndrome
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 1
MedGen UID:
400627
Concept ID:
C1864846
Disease or Syndrome
Primary pigmented micronodular adrenocortical disease is a form of ACTH-independent adrenal hyperplasia resulting in Cushing syndrome. It is usually seen as a manifestation of the Carney complex (CNC1; 160980), a multiple neoplasia syndrome. However, PPNAD can also occur in isolation (Groussin et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pigmented Micronodular Adrenocortical Disease See also PPNAD2 (610475), caused by mutation in the PDE11A gene (604961) on chromosome 2q31; PPNAD3 (614190), caused by mutation in the PDE8B gene (603390) on chromosome 5q13; and PPNAD4 (615830), caused by a duplication on chromosome 19p13 that includes the PRKACA gene (601639).
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 2
MedGen UID:
355843
Concept ID:
C1864851
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile nephronophthisis
MedGen UID:
355574
Concept ID:
C1865872
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Glomerulopathy with fibronectin deposits 2
MedGen UID:
356149
Concept ID:
C1866075
Disease or Syndrome
Glomerulopathy with fibronectin deposits is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and hypertension that leads to end-stage renal failure in the second to fifth decade of life. Pathologic examination shows enlarged glomeruli with mesangial and subendothelial fibrillary deposits that show strong immunoreactivity to fibronectin (Castelletti et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GFND, see 137950.
Scalp-ear-nipple syndrome
MedGen UID:
357183
Concept ID:
C1867020
Disease or Syndrome
Scalp-ear-nipple syndrome is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp, breast anomalies that range from hypothelia or athelia to amastia, and minor anomalies of the external ears. Less frequent clinical characteristics include nail dystrophy, dental anomalies, cutaneous syndactyly of the digits, and renal malformations. Penetrance appears to be high, although there is substantial variable expressivity within families (Marneros et al., 2013).
Medullary cystic kidney disease 1
MedGen UID:
358137
Concept ID:
C1868139
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease, MUC1-related (ADTKD-MUC1) was previously known as medullary cystic kidney disease type 1. It is characterized by slowly progressive tubulointerstitial disease that leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation. ESRD typically occurs in adulthood but is extremely variable, occurring at any age between 20 and 70 years. There are no other systemic manifestations.
Gaucher disease type I
MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
XFE progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
410064
Concept ID:
C1970416
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive condition caused by mutation(s) in the ERCC4 gene, encoding DNA repair endonuclease XPF. it is characterized by characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity and progeroid features in multiple organ systems.
Coronary artery disease, autosomal dominant 2
MedGen UID:
370259
Concept ID:
C1970440
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric carpo-tarsal osteolysis with or without nephropathy
MedGen UID:
436237
Concept ID:
C2674705
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric carpotarsal osteolysis syndrome is a rare skeletal disorder, usually presenting in early childhood with a clinical picture mimicking juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Progressive destruction of the carpal and tarsal bone usually occurs and other bones may also be involved. Chronic renal failure is a frequent component of the syndrome. Mental retardation and minor facial anomalies have been noted in some patients. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been documented in many families (Pai and Macpherson, 1988). See also Torg-Winchester syndrome (259600), an autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis syndrome.
Hunter-MacDonald syndrome
MedGen UID:
383181
Concept ID:
C2677745
Disease or Syndrome
Neuroblastoma 1
MedGen UID:
412713
Concept ID:
C2749485
Finding
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
412743
Concept ID:
C2749604
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, megarbane-dagher-melki type
MedGen UID:
413221
Concept ID:
C2750075
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Mégarbané type is a rare, primary bone dysplasia characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, pre- and postnatal disproportionate short stature with short, rhizomelic limbs, facial dysmorphism, a short neck and small thorax. Hypotonia, cardiomegaly and global developmetal delay have also been associated. Several radiographic findings have been reported, including ribs with cupped ends, platyspondyly, square iliac bones, horizontal and trident acetabula, hypoplastic ischia, and delayed epiphyseal ossification.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 5
MedGen UID:
413315
Concept ID:
C2750475
Disease or Syndrome
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic entity associated clinically with proteinuria, the nephrotic syndrome (NPHS), and progressive loss of renal function. It is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (Meyrier, 2005). Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease E and focal segmental glomerulonephritis (CMTDIE; 614455) is also caused by heterozygous mutation in the INF2 gene. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome, see FSGS1 (603278).
Polycystic kidney disease 2
MedGen UID:
442699
Concept ID:
C2751306
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is generally a late-onset multisystem disorder characterized by bilateral renal cysts, liver cysts, and an increased risk of intracranial aneurysms. Other manifestations include: cysts in the pancreas, seminal vesicles, and arachnoid membrane; dilatation of the aortic root and dissection of the thoracic aorta; mitral valve prolapse; and abdominal wall hernias. Renal manifestations include hypertension, renal pain, and renal insufficiency. Approximately 50% of individuals with ADPKD have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by age 60 years. The prevalence of liver cysts increases with age and occasionally results in clinically significant severe polycystic liver disease (PLD). Overall the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is fivefold higher than in the general population and further increased in those with a positive family history of aneurysms or subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is substantial variability in the severity of renal disease and other extrarenal manifestations even within the same family.
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
414541
Concept ID:
C2752036
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
442875
Concept ID:
C2752037
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
416691
Concept ID:
C2752038
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
414542
Concept ID:
C2752039
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
414167
Concept ID:
C2752040
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Glycogen storage disease due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency type IA
MedGen UID:
415885
Concept ID:
C2919796
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys, resulting in hepatomegaly and renomegaly. The two subtypes (GSDIa and GSDIb) are clinically indistinguishable. Some untreated neonates present with severe hypoglycemia; more commonly, however, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and/or hypoglycemic seizures. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with fat cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis. Untreated GSDIb is associated with impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia after the first few years of life, all of which result in recurrent bacterial infections and oral and intestinal mucosal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include growth retardation resulting in short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, renal disease, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignant transformation, polycystic ovaries, pancreatitis, and changes in brain function. Normal growth and puberty is expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
Classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
424833
Concept ID:
C2936858
Congenital Abnormality
21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a family of autosomal recessive disorders involving impaired synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. In 21-OHD CAH, excessive adrenal androgen biosynthesis results in virilization in all individuals and salt wasting in some individuals. A classic form with severe enzyme deficiency and prenatal onset of virilization is distinguished from a non-classic form with mild enzyme deficiency and postnatal onset. The classic form is further divided into the simple virilizing form (~25% of affected individuals) and the salt-wasting form, in which aldosterone production is inadequate (=75% of individuals). Newborns with salt-wasting 21-OHD CAH are at risk for life-threatening salt-wasting crises. Individuals with the non-classic form of 21-OHD CAH present postnatally with signs of hyperandrogenism; females with the non-classic form are not virilized at birth.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
422452
Concept ID:
C2936862
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, kidney dysfunction, polydactyly, behavioral dysfunction, and hypogonadism (summary by Beales et al., 1999). Eight proteins implicated in the disorder assemble to form the BBSome, a stable complex involved in signaling receptor trafficking to and from cilia (summary by Scheidecker et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome BBS1 is caused by mutation in a gene on chromosome 11q13 (209901); BBS2 (615981), by mutation in a gene on 16q13 (606151); BBS3 (600151), by mutation in the ARL6 gene on 3q11 (608845); BBS4 (615982), by mutation in a gene on 15q22 (600374); BBS5 (615983), by mutation in a gene on 2q31 (603650); BBS6 (605231), by the MKKS gene on 20p12 (604896), mutations in which also cause McKusick-Kaufman syndrome (236700); BBS7 (615984), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (607590); BBS8 (615985), by mutation in the TTC8 gene on 14q32 (608132); BBS9 (615986), by mutation in a gene on 7p14 (607968); BBS10 (615987), by mutation in a gene on 12q (610148); BBS11 (615988), by mutation in the TRIM32 gene on 9q33 (602290); BBS12 (615989), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (610683); BBS13 (615990), by mutation in the MKS1 gene (609883) on 17q23, mutations in which also cause Meckel syndrome-1 (249000); BBS14 (615991), by mutation in the CEP290 gene (610142) on 12q21, mutations in which also cause Meckel syndrome-4 (611134) and several other disorders; BBS15 (615992), by mutation in the C2ORF86 gene (613580), which encodes a homolog of the Drosophila planar cell polarity gene 'fritz,' on 2p15; BBS16 (615993), by mutation in the SDCCAG8 gene (613524) on 1q43, mutations in which also cause Senior-Loken syndrome-7 (613615); BBS17 (615994), by mutation in the LZTFL1 gene (606568) on 3p21; BBS18 (615995), by mutation in the BBIP1 gene (613605) on 10q25; BBS19 (615996), by mutation in the IFT27 gene (615870) on 22q12; BBS20 (617119), by mutation in the IFT74 gene (608040) on 9p21; and BBS21 (617406), by mutation in the C8ORF37 gene (614477). The CCDC28B gene (610162) modifies the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Mutations in MKS1, MKS3 (TMEM67; 609884), and C2ORF86 also modify the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Although BBS had originally been thought to be a recessive disorder, Katsanis et al. (2001) demonstrated that clinical manifestation of some forms of Bardet-Biedl syndrome requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 loci plus an additional mutation in a second locus. While Katsanis et al. (2001) called this 'triallelic inheritance,' Burghes et al. (2001) suggested the term 'recessive inheritance with a modifier of penetrance.' Mykytyn et al. (2002) found no evidence of involvement of the common BBS1 mutation in triallelic inheritance. However, Fan et al. (2004) found heterozygosity in a mutation of the BBS3 gene (608845.0002) as an apparent modifier of the expression of homozygosity of the met390-to-arg mutation in the BBS1 gene (209901.0001). Allelic disorders include nonsyndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa: RP51 (613464), caused by TTC8 mutation, and RP55 (613575), caused by ARL6 mutation.
Polycystic kidney disease, adult type
MedGen UID:
461191
Concept ID:
C3149841
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is generally a late-onset multisystem disorder characterized by bilateral renal cysts, liver cysts, and an increased risk of intracranial aneurysms. Other manifestations include: cysts in the pancreas, seminal vesicles, and arachnoid membrane; dilatation of the aortic root and dissection of the thoracic aorta; mitral valve prolapse; and abdominal wall hernias. Renal manifestations include hypertension, renal pain, and renal insufficiency. Approximately 50% of individuals with ADPKD have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by age 60 years. The prevalence of liver cysts increases with age and occasionally results in clinically significant severe polycystic liver disease (PLD). Overall the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is fivefold higher than in the general population and further increased in those with a positive family history of aneurysms or subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is substantial variability in the severity of renal disease and other extrarenal manifestations even within the same family.
Nephronophthisis-like nephropathy 1
MedGen UID:
461769
Concept ID:
C3150419
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Chromosome 17q23.1-q23.2 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
461957
Concept ID:
C3150607
Disease or Syndrome
17q23.1q23.2 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described syndrome characterized by developmental delay, microcephaly, short stature, heart defects and limb abnormalities.
Long QT syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
462083
Concept ID:
C3150733
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Cranioectodermal dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
462224
Concept ID:
C3150874
Disease or Syndrome
Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED) is a ciliopathy with skeletal involvement (narrow thorax, shortened proximal limbs, syndactyly, polydactyly, brachydactyly), ectodermal features (widely spaced hypoplastic teeth, hypodontia, sparse hair, skin laxity, abnormal nails), joint laxity, growth deficiency, and characteristic facial features (frontal bossing, low-set simple ears, high forehead, telecanthus, epicanthal folds, full cheeks, everted lower lip). Most affected children develop nephronophthisis that often leads to end-stage kidney disease in infancy or childhood, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hepatic fibrosis and retinal dystrophy are also observed. Dolichocephaly, often secondary to sagittal craniosynostosis, is a primary manifestation that distinguishes CED from most other ciliopathies. Brain malformations and developmental delay may also occur.
Agenesis of the corpus callosum and congenital lymphedema
MedGen UID:
462237
Concept ID:
C3150887
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hyperaldosteronism type 3
MedGen UID:
462283
Concept ID:
C3150933
Disease or Syndrome
This form of hyperaldosteronism is characterized by hypertension secondary to massive adrenal mineralocorticoid production. Like patients with glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (GRA, or FH I; 103900), patients with FH III present with childhood hypertension, elevated aldosteronism levels, and high levels of the hybrid steroids 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol. However, hypertension and aldosteronism in FH III are not reversed by administration of exogenous glucocorticoids and patients require adrenalectomy to control hypertension (Geller et al., 2008). Reviews Mulatero et al. (2013) reviewed the role of KCNJ5 in adrenal pathophysiology and provided an overview of the clinical and biochemical phenotypes resulting from KCNJ5 mutations in patients with sporadic and familial primary aldosteronism. The authors stated that the prevalence of FH III appeared to be 7% of patients with familial aldosteronism and 0.3% of all cases of primary hyperaldosteronism. In addition, they noted that the total prevalence of reported KCNJ5 mutations in aldosterone-producing adrenal adenomas (APAs) was 40%.
Multisystemic smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome
MedGen UID:
462551
Concept ID:
C3151201
Disease or Syndrome
Multisystemic smooth muscle dysfunction syndrome (MSMDS) presents with a recognizable pattern of complications, including congenital mydriasis, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), pulmonary artery hypertension, aortic and other arterial aneurysms, moyamoya-like cerebrovascular disease, intestinal hypoperistalsis and malrotation, and hypotonic bladder. It is caused by heterozygous mutations of the ACTA2 gene altering the arginine-179 codon (summary by Regalado et al., 2018). See also familial thoracic aortic aneurysm (AAT6; 611788) and moyamoya disease-5 (MYMY5; 614042), which can also be caused by ACTA2 mutation.
Hirschsprung disease, cardiac defects, and autonomic dysfunction
MedGen UID:
462587
Concept ID:
C3151237
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy 4
MedGen UID:
462618
Concept ID:
C3151268
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy type 4 is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder characterized by childhood or young adult onset of loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue primarily affecting the lower limbs, insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension (summary by Gandotra et al., 2011).
IgA nephropathy 2
MedGen UID:
462728
Concept ID:
C3151378
Finding
Nestor-Guillermo progeria syndrome
MedGen UID:
462796
Concept ID:
C3151446
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic progeroid syndrome characterised by a prematurely aged appearance associated with severe osteolysis (notably on mandible, clavicles, ribs, distal phalanges, and long bones), osteoporosis, generalised lipoatrophy and absence of cardiovascular, atherosclerotic and metabolic complications, presenting a relatively long survival. Additional characteristics include growth retardation, joint stiffness (mainly of fingers, hands, knees, and elbows), wide cranial sutures, dysmorphic facial features (prominent eyes, convex nasal ridge, malocclusion, dental crowding, thin lip vermillion, microretrognathia) and persistent eyebrows, eyelashes and scalp hair. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the BANF1 gene on chromosome 11q13.
IgA nephropathy, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
463619
Concept ID:
C3160719
Finding
Atrioventricular septal defect 3
MedGen UID:
477381
Concept ID:
C3275750
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized arterial calcification of infancy 2
MedGen UID:
477791
Concept ID:
C3276161
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) is characterized by infantile onset of widespread arterial calcification and/or narrowing of large and medium-sized vessels resulting in cardiovascular findings (which can include heart failure, respiratory distress, edema, cyanosis, hypertension, and/or cardiomegaly). Additional findings can include typical skin and retinal manifestations of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), periarticular calcifications, development of rickets after infancy, cervical spine fusion, and hearing loss. While mortality in infancy is high, survival into the third and fourth decades has occurred.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
478062
Concept ID:
C3276432
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive disorder of systemic energy metabolism, resulting in weakness, respiratory failure, lack of neurologic development, lactic acidosis, and early death (summary by Seyda et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Syndrome See also MMDS2 (614299), caused by mutation in the BOLA3 gene (613183) on chromosome 2p13; MMDS3 (615330), caused by mutation in the IBA57 gene (615316) on chromosome 1q42; MMDS4 (616370), caused by mutation in the ISCA2 gene (615317) on chromosome 14q24; MMDS5 (617613), caused by mutation in the ISCA1 gene (611006) on chromosome 9q21; and MMDS6 (617954), caused by mutation in the PMPCB gene (603131) on chromosome 7q22.
Nuclearly-encoded mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
481329
Concept ID:
C3279699
Disease or Syndrome
mutation is characterized by early neonatal onset of hypotonia, hypetrophic cardiomyopathy and apneic spells within hours after birth accompanied by lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.
Joubert syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
482396
Concept ID:
C3280766
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2D
MedGen UID:
483335
Concept ID:
C3469605
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described.
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2E
MedGen UID:
483336
Concept ID:
C3469606
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described.
Atrial fibrillation, familial, 14
MedGen UID:
815642
Concept ID:
C3809312
Disease or Syndrome
Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial atrial fibrillation, see ATFB1 (608583).
Primary aldosteronism, seizures, and neurologic abnormalities
MedGen UID:
815939
Concept ID:
C3809609
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, neurologic disease characterized by primary hyperaldosteronism presenting with early-onset, severe hypertension, hypokalemia and neurological manifestations (including seizures, severe hypotonia, spasticity, cerebral palsy and profound developmental delay/intellectual disability).
Morbid obesity and spermatogenic failure
MedGen UID:
816654
Concept ID:
C3810324
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic form of obesity characterized by morbid obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia leading to early coronary disease, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. Intellectual disability and decreased sperm counts or azoospermia have also been reported.
Moyamoya disease 6 with achalasia
MedGen UID:
816733
Concept ID:
C3810403
Disease or Syndrome
Moyamoya disease-6 is a progressive vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and its branches, and the formation of compensatory neovascularization and the moyamoya, or 'puff of smoke,' appearance of these vessels on angiogram. Affected individuals may present with ischemic strokes, intracerebral hemorrhage, or transient ischemic attacks. Patients with MYMY6 usually present early in life with achalasia. Hypertension and Raynaud phenomenon may be associated features (summary by Wallace et al., 2016; Herve et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of moyamoya disease, see MYMY1 (252350).
Polyarteritis nodosa, childhoood-onset
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Apparent mineralocorticoid excess
MedGen UID:
854657
Concept ID:
C3887949
Disease or Syndrome
Apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is an autosomal recessive form of low-renin hypertension associated with low aldosterone, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, and hypokalemia. The disorder is due to a congenital defect in 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (HSD11B2) activity, resulting in decreased conversion of biologically active cortisol to inactive cortisone; this defect allows cortisol to act as a ligand for the mineralocorticoid receptor, resulting in sodium retention and volume expansion. There is a favorable therapeutic response to spironolactone (review by Ferrari, 2010).
Polycystic kidney disease 3
MedGen UID:
854672
Concept ID:
C3887964
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is generally a late-onset multisystem disorder characterized by bilateral renal cysts, liver cysts, and an increased risk of intracranial aneurysms. Other manifestations include: cysts in the pancreas, seminal vesicles, and arachnoid membrane; dilatation of the aortic root and dissection of the thoracic aorta; mitral valve prolapse; and abdominal wall hernias. Renal manifestations include hypertension, renal pain, and renal insufficiency. Approximately 50% of individuals with ADPKD have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by age 60 years. The prevalence of liver cysts increases with age and occasionally results in clinically significant severe polycystic liver disease (PLD). Overall the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is fivefold higher than in the general population and further increased in those with a positive family history of aneurysms or subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is substantial variability in the severity of renal disease and other extrarenal manifestations even within the same family.
Abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
862798
Concept ID:
C4014361
Disease or Syndrome
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 4
MedGen UID:
862862
Concept ID:
C4014425
Disease or Syndrome
Cushing syndrome is a clinical designation for the systemic signs and symptoms arising from excess cortisol production. Affected individuals typically show hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, central obesity, osteoporosis, and sometimes depression. Corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome results from autonomous cortisol production by the adrenal glands, often associated with adrenocortical tumors. Adrenocortical tumors are most common in adult females (summary by Cao et al., 2014; Sato et al., 2014).
Acth-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 2
MedGen UID:
863240
Concept ID:
C4014803
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia-2 is an autosomal dominant tumor susceptibility with syndromic incomplete penetrance, as a second hit to the ARMC5 gene is required to develop macronodular hyperplasia (Assie et al., 2013).
Inflammatory skin and bowel disease, neonatal, 2
MedGen UID:
863567
Concept ID:
C4015130
Disease or Syndrome
IgA nephropathy, susceptibility to, 3
MedGen UID:
897340
Concept ID:
C4225194
Finding
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, primary, 8
MedGen UID:
908648
Concept ID:
C4225226
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Seckel syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
934614
Concept ID:
C4310647
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperaldosteronism, familial, type IV
MedGen UID:
934723
Concept ID:
C4310756
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrops, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia
MedGen UID:
934728
Concept ID:
C4310761
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrops, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (HLASA) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by the onset of hydrops in utero. The severity of the hydrops and the disorder in general is highly variable. At birth, affected infants usually show poor growth, lactic acidosis, pulmonary hypertension with hypoxic respiratory insufficiency, and sideroblastic anemia. More variable features may include hepatosplenomegaly or cholestasis, hypoglycemia, pancreatic insufficiency, and micropenis or hypospadias. Death in infancy may occur. Those who survive tend to have resolution of lactic acidosis and anemia, but may show developmental delay and sensorineural deafness (summary by Riley et al., 2020).
Marfan lipodystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
934763
Concept ID:
C4310796
Disease or Syndrome
The marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome (MFLS) is characterized by congenital lipodystrophy, premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to weight gain, and progeroid appearance with distinct facial features, including proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, and retrognathia. Other characteristic features include arachnodactyly, digital hyperextensibility, myopia, dural ectasia, and normal psychomotor development (Takenouchi et al., 2013). Takenouchi et al. (2013) noted phenotypic overlap with Marfan syndrome (154700) and Shprintzen-Goldberg craniosynostosis syndrome (182212).
Somatotroph adenoma
MedGen UID:
1618709
Concept ID:
C4538355
Neoplastic Process
AIP familial isolated pituitary adenoma (AIP-FIPA) is defined as the presence of an AIP germline pathogenic variant in an individual with a pituitary adenoma (regardless of family history). The most commonly occurring pituitary adenomas in this disorder are growth hormone-secreting adenomas (somatotropinoma), followed by prolactin-secreting adenomas (prolactinoma), growth hormone and prolactin co-secreting adenomas (somatomammotropinoma), and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). Rarely TSH-secreting adenomas (thyrotropinomas) are observed. Clinical findings result from excess hormone secretion, lack of hormone secretion, and/or mass effects (e.g., headaches, visual field loss). Within the same family, pituitary adenomas can be of the same or different type. Age of onset in AIP-FIPA is usually in the second or third decade.
Galloway-Mowat syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1627611
Concept ID:
C4540266
Disease or Syndrome
Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a renal-neurologic disease characterized by early-onset nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, gyral abnormalities of the brain, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients have dysmorphic facial features, often including hypertelorism, ear abnormalities, and micrognathia. Other features, such as arachnodactyly and visual impairment, are more variable. Most patients die in the first years of life (summary by Braun et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GAMOS, see GAMOS1 (251300).
Adams-Oliver syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1635567
Concept ID:
C4551482
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 1
MedGen UID:
1636833
Concept ID:
C4551527
Disease or Syndrome
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic finding in several renal disorders that manifest clinically as proteinuria and progressive decline in renal function. Some patients with FSGS develop the clinical entity called 'nephrotic syndrome' (see NPHS1; 256300), which includes massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, and edema. However, patients with FSGS may have proteinuria in the nephrotic range without other features of the nephrotic syndrome (summary by D'Agati et al., 2004; Mathis et al., 1998). D'Agati et al. (2011) provided a detailed review of FSGS, emphasizing that the disorder results from defects of the podocyte. Because of confusion in the literature regarding use of the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'focal segmental glomerulosclerosis' (see NOMENCLATURE section), these disorders in OMIM are classified as NPHS or FSGS according to how they were first designated in the literature. Genetic Heterogeneity of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Nephrotic Syndrome Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome are genetically heterogeneous disorders representing a spectrum of hereditary renal diseases. See also FSGS2 (603965), caused by mutation in the TRPC6 gene (603652); FSGS3 (607832), associated with variation in the CD2AP gene (604241); FSGS4 (612551), mapped to chromosome 22q12; FSGS5 (613237), caused by mutation in the INF2 gene (610982); FSGS6 (614131), caused by mutation in the MYO1E gene (601479); FSGS7 (616002), caused by mutation in the PAX2 gene (167409); FSGS8 (616032), caused by mutation in the ANLN gene (616027); FSGS9 (616220), caused by mutation in the CRB2 gene (609720); and FSGS10 (256020), caused by mutation in the LMX1B gene (602575). See also NPHS1 (256300), caused by mutation in the NPHS1 gene (602716); NPHS2 (600995), caused by mutation in the podocin gene (604766); NPHS3 (610725), caused by mutation in the PLCE1 gene (608414); NPHS4 (256370), caused by mutation in the WT1 gene (607102); NPHS5 (614199), caused by mutation in the LAMB2 gene (150325); NPHS6 (614196), caused by mutation in the PTPRO gene (600579); NPHS7 (615008), caused by mutation in the DGKE gene (601440); NPHS8 (615244), caused by mutation in the ARHGDIA gene (601925); NPHS9 (615573), caused by mutation in the COQ8B gene (615567); NPHS10 (615861), caused by mutation in the EMP2 gene (602334); NPHS11 (616730), caused by mutation in the NUP107 gene (607617); NPHS12 (616892), caused by mutation in the NUP93 gene (614351); NPHS13 (616893), caused by mutation in the NUP205 gene (614352); NPHS14 (617575), caused by mutation in the SGPL1 gene (603729); NPHS15 (617609), caused by mutation in the MAGI2 gene (606382); NPHS16 (617783), caused by mutation in the KANK2 gene (614610), NPHS17 (618176), caused by mutation in the NUP85 gene (170285); NPHS18 (618177), caused by mutation in the NUP133 gene (607613); NPHS19 (618178), caused by mutation in the NUP160 gene (607614); NPHS20 (301028), caused by mutation in the TBC1D8B gene (301027); and NPHS21 (618594) caused by mutation in the AVIL gene (613397).
Primary familial polycythemia due to EPO receptor mutation
MedGen UID:
1641215
Concept ID:
C4551637
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial and congenital polycythemia (PFCP) is characterized by isolated erythrocytosis in an individual with a normal-sized spleen and absence of disorders causing secondary erythrocytosis. Clinical manifestations relate to the erythrocytosis and can include plethora, the hyperviscosity syndrome (headache, dizziness, fatigue, lassitude, visual and auditory disturbances, paresthesia, myalgia), altered mental status caused by hypoperfusion and local hypoxia, and arterial and/or venous thromboembolic events. Although the majority of individuals with PFCP have only mild manifestations of hyperviscosity such as dizziness or headache, some affected individuals have had severe and even fatal complications including arterial hypertension, intracerebral hemorrhage, deep vein thrombosis, coronary disease, and myocardial infarction. To date 116 affected individuals from 24 families have been reported.
Nephronophthisis 1
MedGen UID:
1638799
Concept ID:
C4551979
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Arterial calcification, generalized, of infancy, 1
MedGen UID:
1631685
Concept ID:
C4551985
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) is characterized by infantile onset of widespread arterial calcification and/or narrowing of large and medium-sized vessels resulting in cardiovascular findings (which can include heart failure, respiratory distress, edema, cyanosis, hypertension, and/or cardiomegaly). Additional findings can include typical skin and retinal manifestations of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), periarticular calcifications, development of rickets after infancy, cervical spine fusion, and hearing loss. While mortality in infancy is high, survival into the third and fourth decades has occurred.
Primary pulmonary hypertension 1
MedGen UID:
1643124
Concept ID:
C4552070
Disease or Syndrome
Primary pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare, often fatal, progressive vascular lung disease characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance and sustained elevation of mean pulmonary arterial pressure, leading to right ventricular hypertrophy and right heart failure. Pathologic features include a narrowing and thickening of small pulmonary vessels and plexiform lesions. There is pulmonary vascular remodeling of all layers of pulmonary arterial vessels: intimal thickening, smooth muscle cell hypertrophy or hyperplasia, adventitial fibrosis, and occluded vessels by in situ thrombosis (summary by Machado et al., 2009 and Han et al., 2013). Heterozygous mutations in the BMPR2 gene are found in nearly 70% of families with heritable PPH and in 25% of patients with sporadic disease. The disease is more common in women (female:male ratio of 1.7:1). However, the penetrance of PPH1 is incomplete: only about 10 to 20% of individuals with BMPR2 mutations develop the disease during their lifetime, suggesting that development of the disorder is triggered by other genetic or environmental factors. Patients with PPH1 are less likely to respond to acute vasodilater testing and are unlikely to benefit from treatment with calcium channel blockade (summary by Machado et al., 2009 and Han et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pulmonary Hypertension PPH2 (615342) is caused by mutation in the SMAD9 gene (603295) on chromosome 13q13; PPH3 (615343) is caused by mutation in the CAV1 gene (601047) on chromosome 7q31; and PPH4 (615344) is caused by mutation in the KCNK3 gene (603220) on chromosome 2p23. See 265400 for a possible autosomal recessive form of PPH. Primary pulmonary hypertension may also be found in association with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1 (HHT1; 187300), caused by mutation in the ENG gene (131195), and HHT2 (600376), caused by mutation in the ACVRL1 (ALK1) gene (601284). Pediatric-onset pulmonary hypertension may be seen in association with ischiocoxopodopatellar syndrome (ICPPS; 147891). The skeletal manifestations of ICPPS are highly variable and may not be detected in children. Parents are not likely to have PAH (Levy et al., 2016).
Alport syndrome 3, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1648326
Concept ID:
C4746547
Disease or Syndrome
In Alport syndrome (AS) a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from progressive renal disease with extrarenal abnormalities to isolated hematuria with a non-progressive or very slowly progressive course is observed. Approximately two thirds of AS is X-linked (XLAS); approximately 15% is autosomal recessive (ARAS), and approximately 20% is autosomal dominant (ADAS). In the absence of treatment, renal disease progresses from microscopic hematuria (microhematuria) to proteinuria, progressive renal insufficiency, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in all males with XLAS, and in all males and females with ARAS. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is usually present by late childhood or early adolescence. Ocular findings include anterior lenticonus (which is virtually pathognomonic), maculopathy (whitish or yellowish flecks or granulations in the perimacular region), corneal endothelial vesicles (posterior polymorphous dystrophy), and recurrent corneal erosion. In individuals with ADAS, ESRD is frequently delayed until later adulthood, SNHL is relatively late in onset, and ocular involvement is rare.
Alport syndrome, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1648334
Concept ID:
C4746745
Disease or Syndrome
In Alport syndrome (AS) a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from progressive renal disease with extrarenal abnormalities to isolated hematuria with a non-progressive or very slowly progressive course is observed. Approximately two thirds of AS is X-linked (XLAS); approximately 15% is autosomal recessive (ARAS), and approximately 20% is autosomal dominant (ADAS). In the absence of treatment, renal disease progresses from microscopic hematuria (microhematuria) to proteinuria, progressive renal insufficiency, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in all males with XLAS, and in all males and females with ARAS. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is usually present by late childhood or early adolescence. Ocular findings include anterior lenticonus (which is virtually pathognomonic), maculopathy (whitish or yellowish flecks or granulations in the perimacular region), corneal endothelial vesicles (posterior polymorphous dystrophy), and recurrent corneal erosion. In individuals with ADAS, ESRD is frequently delayed until later adulthood, SNHL is relatively late in onset, and ocular involvement is rare.
Alport syndrome 1, X-linked recessive
MedGen UID:
1648433
Concept ID:
C4746986
Disease or Syndrome
In Alport syndrome (AS) a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from progressive renal disease with extrarenal abnormalities to isolated hematuria with a non-progressive or very slowly progressive course is observed. Approximately two thirds of AS is X-linked (XLAS); approximately 15% is autosomal recessive (ARAS), and approximately 20% is autosomal dominant (ADAS). In the absence of treatment, renal disease progresses from microscopic hematuria (microhematuria) to proteinuria, progressive renal insufficiency, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in all males with XLAS, and in all males and females with ARAS. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is usually present by late childhood or early adolescence. Ocular findings include anterior lenticonus (which is virtually pathognomonic), maculopathy (whitish or yellowish flecks or granulations in the perimacular region), corneal endothelial vesicles (posterior polymorphous dystrophy), and recurrent corneal erosion. In individuals with ADAS, ESRD is frequently delayed until later adulthood, SNHL is relatively late in onset, and ocular involvement is rare.
Polycystic kidney disease 6 with or without polycystic liver disease
MedGen UID:
1648469
Concept ID:
C4748044
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic kidney disease-6 is an autosomal dominant renal disease characterized by the development of multiple small renal cysts and progression to renal insufficiency or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) most often after the sixth decade. The cysts are generally small (less than 1 to 3 cm) and the kidneys are not massively enlarged. Some patients may have evidence of chronic interstitial fibrosis and about half develop liver cysts (summary by Cornec-Le Gall et al., 2018). The renal interstitial fibrosis suggests overlap with autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease (ADTKD; see 162000) (summary by Devuyst et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of polycystic kidney disease, see PKD1 (173900).
Liddle syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1648476
Concept ID:
C4748251
Disease or Syndrome
Liddle syndrome is an autosomal dominant form of hypertension characterized by early onset of hypertension associated with hypokalemia, suppressed plasma renin activity, and suppressed secretion of the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone (summary by Hansson et al., 1995). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Liddle syndrome, see 177200.
Liddle syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1648443
Concept ID:
C4748292
Disease or Syndrome
Liddle syndrome, or pseudoaldosteronism, is an autosomal dominant form of salt-sensitive hypertension characterized by suppressed plasma renin and aldosterone, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis (summary by Salih et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Liddle syndrome, see 177200.
Paragangliomas 6
MedGen UID:
1681559
Concept ID:
C5193112
Neoplastic Process
Paragangliomas-6 (PGL6) is an adult-onset tumor predisposition syndrome in which affected individuals develop neuroendocrine neoplasms, known as paragangliomas. Many tumors arise in the abdomen, although some may arise in other regions, including the head and neck. Some of the tumors may secrete biologically active normetanephrines, resulting in secondary hypertension. Tumors may be benign or malignant, and some may metastasize (summary by Buffet et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial paragangliomas, see PGL1 (168000).
Blau syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684759
Concept ID:
C5201146
Disease or Syndrome
Blau syndrome is characterized by the triad of granulomatous arthritis, uveitis, and dermatitis. First described in 1985, it was considered to be distinct from sarcoidosis due to the early age of onset and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Published reports of sporadic cases of children with 'early-onset sarcoidosis' (EOS) with granulomatous involvement of different organs, primarily affecting joints, eyes, and skin, were suspected to represent the same disorder because the patients' characteristics were nearly identical. Subsequently, identical NOD2 mutations were identified in patients with Blau syndrome as well as in patients diagnosed with EOS, confirming earlier suspicions that they represented the same disease (summary by Borzutzky et al., 2010). Unlike older children diagnosed with sarcoidosis, these patients have no apparent pulmonary involvement; however, the disease is progressive and may result in severe complications such as blindness and/or joint destruction (Shetty and Gedalia, 1998).
ABDOMINAL OBESITY-METABOLIC SYNDROME 4
MedGen UID:
1704861
Concept ID:
C5231430
Disease or Syndrome
Lessel-kubisch syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684750
Concept ID:
C5231460
Disease or Syndrome
Lessel-Kubisch syndrome (LSKB) is characterized by short stature and progeroid features, including prematurely gray hair, pinched facies, and scleroderma-like skin changes. Renal failure-associated hypertension and hypogonadism have also been observed (Lessel et al., 2017).
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1708513
Concept ID:
C5394391
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-3 (PTORCH3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation and neuroinflammation apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have developmental delay with acute episodes of fever and multisystemic organ involvement, including coagulopathy, elevated liver enzymes, and proteinuria, often associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Brain imaging shows progressive intracranial calcifications, white matter abnormalities, and sometimes cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. Laboratory studies show abnormal elevation of interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) transcripts consistent with a type I interferonopathy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is usually no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from defects in negative regulation of the interferon immunologic pathway. Death in early childhood is common (summary by Duncan et al., 2019 and Gruber et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290).
Fanconi renotubular syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
1711127
Concept ID:
C5394473
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi renotubular syndrome-5 (FRTS5) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by proximal renotubular dysfunction from birth, followed by progressive kidney disease and pulmonary fibrosis. It occurs only in individuals of Acadian descent (Crocker et al., 1997 and Hartmannova et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fanconi renotubular syndrome, see FRTS1 (134600).
Joubert syndrome with hepatic defect
MedGen UID:
1769861
Concept ID:
C5435651
Disease or Syndrome
COACH syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impaired intellectual development, ataxia due to cerebellar hypoplasia, and hepatic fibrosis. Other features, such as coloboma and renal cysts, may be variable. COACH syndrome is considered by some to be a subtype of Joubert syndrome (JBTS; see 213300) with congenital hepatic fibrosis. Identification of liver disease in these patients is critical because some may develop complications such as portal hypertension with fatal variceal bleeding (Brancati et al., 2009; Doherty et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of COACH Syndrome Also see COACH syndrome-2 (COACH2; 619111), caused by mutation in in the CC2D2A gene (612013), and COACH syndrome-3 (COACH3; 619113), caused by mutation the RPGRIP1L gene (610937). Most cases of COACH syndrome are caused by mutation in the TMEM67 gene.
COACH syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1752166
Concept ID:
C5436837
Disease or Syndrome
COACH syndrome is classically defined as Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, Oligophrenia, Ataxia, Colobomas, and Hepatic fibrosis (Verloes and Lambotte, 1989). Brain MRI demonstrates the molar tooth sign, which is a feature of Joubert syndrome. The disorder has been described as a Joubert syndrome-related disorder with liver disease (summary by Doherty et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of COACH syndrome, see 216360.
EAST syndrome
MedGen UID:
411243
Concept ID:
C2748572
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of seizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, intellectual deficit, and electrolyte imbalance. It has been described in five patients from four families. The disease is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the KCNJ10 gene, encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, spinal cord, inner ear and kidneys. Transmission is autosomal recessive.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Makhija A, Khatik N, Raghunandan C
Complement Ther Clin Pract 2021 May;43:101366. Epub 2021 Mar 19 doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2021.101366. PMID: 33765549
Hauspurg A, Lemon L, Cabrera C, Javaid A, Binstock A, Quinn B, Larkin J, Watson AR, Beigi RH, Simhan H
JAMA Netw Open 2020 Dec 1;3(12):e2030815. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.30815. PMID: 33351087Free PMC Article
Moe K, Sugulle M, Dechend R, Angel K, Staff AC
Pregnancy Hypertens 2020 Jul;21:23-29. Epub 2020 Apr 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2020.04.008. PMID: 32361394
Walle TA, Azagew AW
Pregnancy Hypertens 2019 Apr;16:79-84. Epub 2019 Mar 12 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2019.03.007. PMID: 31056163
Han B, Xu M
Pregnancy Hypertens 2017 Jan;7:33-38. Epub 2016 Dec 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2016.12.003. PMID: 28279445

Diagnosis

Hauspurg A, Lemon L, Cabrera C, Javaid A, Binstock A, Quinn B, Larkin J, Watson AR, Beigi RH, Simhan H
JAMA Netw Open 2020 Dec 1;3(12):e2030815. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.30815. PMID: 33351087Free PMC Article
Kumar N, Singh AK
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Mar;58(2):244-250. doi: 10.1016/j.tjog.2019.01.014. PMID: 30910147
Lumbreras-Marquez J, Castillo-Reyther RA, De-la-Maza-Labastida S, Vazquez-Alaniz F
J Med Case Rep 2018 Jan 17;12(1):12. doi: 10.1186/s13256-017-1534-6. PMID: 29338776Free PMC Article
Han B, Xu M
Pregnancy Hypertens 2017 Jan;7:33-38. Epub 2016 Dec 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2016.12.003. PMID: 28279445
Traylor J, Chandrasekaran S, Limaye M, Srinivas S, Durnwald CP
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2016;29(13):2067-72. Epub 2015 Sep 15 doi: 10.3109/14767058.2015.1081591. PMID: 26371379

Therapy

Makhija A, Khatik N, Raghunandan C
Complement Ther Clin Pract 2021 May;43:101366. Epub 2021 Mar 19 doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2021.101366. PMID: 33765549
Ferrari L, Borghi F, Iodice S, Catelan D, Rossi S, Giusti I, Grisotto L, Rovelli S, Spinazzè A, Alinovi R, Pinelli S, Cantone L, Dioni L, Ischia B, Rota I, Mariani J, Rota F, Hoxha M, Stoppa G, Monticelli D, Cavallo D, Bergamaschi E, Vicenzi M, Persico N, Biggeri A, Cattaneo A, Dolo V, Miragoli M, Mozzoni P, Bollati V
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 Dec 4;17(23) doi: 10.3390/ijerph17239046. PMID: 33561039Free PMC Article
Mayne SL, Yellayi D, Pool LR, Grobman WA, Kershaw KN
Am J Hypertens 2018 Oct 15;31(11):1221-1227. doi: 10.1093/ajh/hpy112. PMID: 30010764Free PMC Article
Lumbreras-Marquez J, Castillo-Reyther RA, De-la-Maza-Labastida S, Vazquez-Alaniz F
J Med Case Rep 2018 Jan 17;12(1):12. doi: 10.1186/s13256-017-1534-6. PMID: 29338776Free PMC Article
Han B, Xu M
Pregnancy Hypertens 2017 Jan;7:33-38. Epub 2016 Dec 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2016.12.003. PMID: 28279445

Prognosis

Moe K, Sugulle M, Dechend R, Angel K, Staff AC
Pregnancy Hypertens 2020 Jul;21:23-29. Epub 2020 Apr 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2020.04.008. PMID: 32361394
Kumar N, Singh AK
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Mar;58(2):244-250. doi: 10.1016/j.tjog.2019.01.014. PMID: 30910147
Wang Y, Liu LL, Tian Y, Chen Y, Zha WH, Li Y, Wu FJ
Int J Biol Macromol 2019 Jan;121:488-497. Epub 2018 Sep 20 doi: 10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.09.111. PMID: 30243997
Katsuragi S, Tanaka H, Hasegawa J, Nakamura M, Kanayama N, Nakata M, Murakoshi T, Yoshimatsu J, Osato K, Tanaka K, Sekizawa A, Ishiwata I, Ikeda T; Maternal Death Exploratory Committee in Japan and Japan Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2019 Oct;32(20):3420-3426. Epub 2018 Apr 26 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2018.1465549. PMID: 29699420
Ajmi H, Abid D, Milouchi S, Louati D, Sghaier A, Choura D, Chaaben K, Abid L, Kammoun S
Pregnancy Hypertens 2018 Jan;11:136-141. Epub 2017 Oct 23 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2017.10.008. PMID: 29102595

Clinical prediction guides

Moe K, Sugulle M, Dechend R, Angel K, Staff AC
Pregnancy Hypertens 2020 Jul;21:23-29. Epub 2020 Apr 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2020.04.008. PMID: 32361394
Su M, Hu Z, Dong C, Xu X
Pregnancy Hypertens 2019 Jul;17:191-196. Epub 2019 May 9 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2019.05.012. PMID: 31487639
Kumar N, Singh AK
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Mar;58(2):244-250. doi: 10.1016/j.tjog.2019.01.014. PMID: 30910147
Wang Y, Liu LL, Tian Y, Chen Y, Zha WH, Li Y, Wu FJ
Int J Biol Macromol 2019 Jan;121:488-497. Epub 2018 Sep 20 doi: 10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.09.111. PMID: 30243997
Han B, Xu M
Pregnancy Hypertens 2017 Jan;7:33-38. Epub 2016 Dec 24 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2016.12.003. PMID: 28279445

Recent systematic reviews

Tesfa E, Nibret E, Gizaw ST, Zenebe Y, Mekonnen Z, Assefa S, Melese M, Fentahun N, Munshea A
PLoS One 2020;15(9):e0239048. Epub 2020 Sep 16 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0239048. PMID: 32936834Free PMC Article
Chaemsaithong P, Cuenca-Gomez D, Plana MN, Gil MM, Poon LC
Am J Obstet Gynecol 2020 May;222(5):437-450. Epub 2019 Sep 5 doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2019.08.047. PMID: 31494125
Su M, Hu Z, Dong C, Xu X
Pregnancy Hypertens 2019 Jul;17:191-196. Epub 2019 May 9 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2019.05.012. PMID: 31487639
Gui S, Jia J, Niu X, Bai Y, Zou H, Deng J, Zhou R
J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst 2014 Mar;15(1):88-96. Epub 2013 Feb 22 doi: 10.1177/1470320313475910. PMID: 23435582
Langenveld J, Jansen S, van der Post J, Wolf H, Mol BW, Ganzevoort W
Am J Perinatol 2010 Aug;27(7):565-71. Epub 2010 Feb 19 doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1248944. PMID: 20175043

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