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Cover of Reducing the Burden of Injury

Reducing the Burden of Injury

Advancing Prevention and Treatment

; Editors: Richard J. Bonnie, Carolyn E. Fulco, and Catharyn T. Liverman.

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); .
ISBN-10: 0-309-06566-6

Injuries are the leading cause of death and disability among people under age 35 in the United States. Despite great strides in injury prevention over the decades, injuries result in 150,000 deaths, 2.6 million hospitalizations, and 36 million visits to the emergency room each year.

Reducing the Burden of Injury describes the cost and magnitude of the injury problem in America and looks critically at the current response by the public and private sectors, including:

  • Data and surveillance needs.
  • Research priorities.
  • Trauma care systems development.
  • Infrastructure support, including training for injury professionals.
  • Firearm safety.
  • Coordination among federal agencies.
The authors define the field of injury and establish boundaries for the field regarding intentional injuries. This book highlights the crosscutting nature of the injury field, identifies opportunities to leverage resources and expertise of the numerous parties involved, and discusses issues regarding leadership at the federal level.

Contents

Support for this project was provided by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The views presented are those of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Injury Prevention and Control and are not necessarily those of the funding organization.

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

The Institute of Medicine was chartered in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to enlist distinguished members of the appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. In this, the Institute acts under both the Academy's 1863 congressional charter responsibility to be an advisor to the federal government and its own initiative in identifying issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine.

Copyright 1999 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Bookshelf ID: NBK230590PMID: 25101422DOI: 10.17226/6321

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