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Tubal ligation or sterilisation ( tying the tubes ) is a common method of fertility regulation. It is usually done by using the following methods: mini‐laparotomy ( through a small cut in the abdomen ), laparoscopy ( "keyhole" surgery ‐ through a tube inserted through the umbilicus ( belly button ) or a very small cut ), or culdoscopy ( using a tube, but through the vagina ). The review found that overall, laparoscopy had fewer complications than mini‐laparotomy, but it requires more sophisticated expensive equipment and greater skills. Culdoscopy has higher rates of complications.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Many women choose tubal sterilisation as a way of birth control. Even if a small percentage of women later regret the decision, large numbers of women will seek counselling regarding reversal from their physicians. The review authors searched the literature and were unable to find any trial that met the criteria for this review. There is little likelihood that any future research will be conducted to compare IVF with tubal reanastomosis for subfertility after tubal sterilisation. Therefore this review will not be updated in the future.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

This is an update of a Cochrane Review that was first published in 2002 and previously updated in 2011.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Reversal of sterilization can be done either by open surgical methods or by a minimally invasive approach. Randomised controlled trials evaluating the benefits of these procedures are not available. Research in this field is recommended.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Sterilizing women to permanently prevent pregnancy can be done using abdominal surgery or using a hysteroscopy procedure. While the hysteroscopy procedure is less invasive than abdominal surgery, women may experience more pain with the hysteroscopy procedure when it is performed in a doctor's office. Concern about pain may influence women's decisions to have the hysteroscopy for sterilization procedures. This review evaluates the impact of interventions to reduce the pain associated with sterilization by hysteroscopy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Cochrane authors compared the initiation rate, effectiveness, and side effects of insertion of a contraceptive implant (implant for birth control) soon after childbirth versus delayed insertion at postpartum visit.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 22, 2017

Expert-reviewed information summary about factors that may influence the risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancers and about research aimed at the prevention of them.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 10, 2017

Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform the surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is costly, time consuming, and is of variable effectiveness. Laparoscopic surgery involves use of instruments using key‐hole incisions and is generally considered more difficult than open surgery. Training using box models (physical simulation) is an option to supplement standard laparoscopic surgical training. The impact of box model training in surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience is unknown. We sought to answer the question of whether the box model training is useful in such trainees in terms of improving technical outcomes by performing a thorough search of the medical literature for randomised clinical trials. Randomised clinical trials are commonly called randomised controlled trials and are the best study design to answer such questions. If conducted well, they provide the most accurate answers to questions about intervention effects. Two authors searched the medical literature available to May 2013 and obtained the information from the identified trials. The use of two authors decreases the errors in obtaining the information.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

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