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We reviewed the evidence to assess the relative risks and benefits of drugs to rehydrate sickled red blood cells.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

We wanted to assess how effective and safe folate supplementation (folate occurring naturally in foods, provided as fortified foods or additional supplements such as tablets) is in people with sickle cell disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

When the blood has insufficient red cells, or the red cells carry insufficient haemoglobin to deliver adequate oxygen to the tissues, this is called anaemia. There is normally a reduction in the haemoglobin concentrations in the mother's blood during pregnancy, and this allows a better blood flow around the womb (uterus) and to the baby. This is sometime called physiological anaemia and needs no treatment. True anaemia, however, can be mild, moderate or severe and can cause weakness, tiredness and dizziness. Severe anaemia makes women at risk of cardiac failure and is very common in low‐income countries Anaemia has many causes including a shortage or iron, folic acid or vitamin B12. These are all required for making red cells and are available in a good diet. Iron shortage, however, is the most common cause of anaemia during pregnancy. Iron treatment can be given by mouth (oral), by injection into the muscle (intramuscular) or injection into the vein (intravenous). Blood transfusion or giving something which stimulates the body to produce more red cells (erythropoietin) are also possible treatments.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Erythropoietin, a hormone, may help to treat women who develop anaemia after giving birth, but there may be rare adverse events.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Very premature infants are extremely vulnerable and often require intensive care to survive. Anaemia is a condition in which the blood does not contain enough haemoglobin, the component of red blood cells which carries oxygen around the body. These babies become anaemic very quickly due to blood sampling and because they are unable to make blood cells quickly the haemoglobin level in the blood falls rapidly in the weeks after birth. Generally, the treatment for anaemia is blood transfusion, and many of these babies receive multiple transfusions of blood. The decision to give a transfusion usually depends on the measured amount of haemoglobin in the blood.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

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