Home > Search Results

Treats many diseases and conditions, especially problems related to inflammation. This medicine is a corticosteroid.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 69

Clear

Nephrotic syndrome is a condition where the kidneys leak protein from the blood into the urine. Minimal change disease is the third most common primary kidney disease in adults with unexplained nephrotic syndrome (10% to 15%). Steroids have been used widely since the early 1970s for the treatment of adult‐onset minimal change disease, however the optimal agent, dose and duration has not been determined. This review identified three small studies (68 participants) comparing: 1) intravenous plus oral steroid treatment versus oral sterids; 2) oral versus short‐course intravenous steroid treatment; and 3) oral steroid treatment versus placebo. Only oral steroid treatment (compared to short‐course intravenous steroid treatment) showed an increase in the number of patients who achieved complete remission. However, the lack of available studies leaves important treatment questions unanswered; what is the optimal dose and duration of steroid treatment in new‐onset adult minimal change disease; how are relapses following steroid‐induced remission prevented and treated; and what are the appropriate treatments for steroid‐dependent or treatment‐resistant minimal change disease?

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Loss of ankle flexibility is a common problem for people with neuromuscular disease. It can cause foot deformity, pain and problems walking. The purpose of this review was to assess the evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions for improving ankle flexibility in people with neuromuscular disease. Four studies were included in the review involving a total of 149 participants. Two studies showed that wearing a night splint was no more effective than not wearing a night splint for increasing ankle flexibility in 26 people who had Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth disease type 1A. One study showed corticosteroids (prednisone) did not significantly improve ankle flexibility in 103 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the other study showed that while orthopaedic surgery initially increased ankle flexibility in 20 young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy this was not sustained in the long term. This review shows that, currently, there is limited evidence supporting any intervention for improving ankle flexibility in patients with Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth disease type 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. More research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Myasthenia gravis is caused by antibodies in the blood which attack the junctions between nerves and muscles they stimulate. Plasma exchange removes these circulating auto‐antibodies. Many case series suggest that plasma exchange helps to treat myasthenia gravis. Four randomised controlled trials were identified. In the first one, of 14 participants with moderate or severe myasthenia gravis, the myasthenic muscular score after one month was not significantly different for participants treated with plasma exchange and prednisone than for those treated with prednisone alone but there can be only low statistical confidence in the results of this study because of its small size. A randomised controlled cross‐over trial of only 12 participants reported the same efficacy, after four weeks, of plasma exchange or intravenous immunoglobulins for the treatment of moderate to severe myasthenia gravis, but because of bias and a very weak statistical power the data prevent any conclusion. The third, including 87 participants, showed the same efficacy, after two weeks, of plasma exchange or intravenous immunoglobulins for the treatment of myasthenia gravis exacerbation. The fourth randomised controlled trial involving 35 participants reported a benefit from plasma exchange before thymectomy but this trial was heavily biased. No trial addressed the new subtype with antibodies to a muscle specific kinase. Further research is needed to determine the value of long‐term plasma exchange for treating myasthenia gravis and to compare plasma exchange with alternative short‐term treatments for myasthenic crisis or before thymectomy in both types of autoimmune myasthenia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is emerging globally as a significant cause of upper gastrointestinal disease in people with clinical symptoms of esophageal disease including a typical appearance of the esophagus and an increased number of eosinophil white blood cells when the esophagus is examined by an endoscope using high magnification.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Inhaled corticosteroids form the first choice for preventative treatment of asthma, but they remain expensive for health economies in developing countries. Oral prednisolone is very much cheaper. In this review, we found that, in the management of adults with chronic asthma, a daily dose of prednisolone 7.5 mg/day appears to be equivalent to a moderate to high dose of inhaled steroids (300‐2000 mcg/day). Side effects may be present even with low doses of prednisolone, so if there is no alternative to oral steroids, the lowest effective dose should be prescribed. These findings may be use in developing countries where inhaled steroids are not widely available.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Nephrotic syndrome is a condition where the kidneys leak protein from the blood into the urine. Corticosteroids are used in the first instance to achieve remission. Some children do not respond to this treatment (steroid‐resistant nephrotic syndrome) and other agents such as cyclophosphamide, calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporin, tacrolimus) or angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitors may be used.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease in the West. Incidence figures are not available for most parts of the world but BP appears to be rarer in the Far East. Bullous pemphigoid is usually a disease of the elderly but it can also affect younger people and children. Both sexes are similarly affected. While BP usually resolves within five years, there is a moderate death rate associated with the disease and its treatment. Oral corticosteroid drugs are the most common treatment, but may be associated with serious adverse effects, including some deaths. The most common adverse effects of oral steroids, include weight gain and high blood pressure. Long‐term use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and decreased bone density. Topical steroids are also associated with adverse effects, such as thinning of the skin and easy bruising. The risk of experiencing adverse effects of topical steroids depends on the strength of the steroid, how long it is used for, which area of the body it is applied to, and the kind of skin problem; if a high‐strength, potent steroid is used, enough may be absorbed through the skin to cause adverse effects in the rest of the body.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

We reviewed the evidence about the benefits and harms of using corticosteroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Sarcoidosis is a condition that can affect most of the organs in the body, including the lungs, heart, brain, bones, liver and skin. Patients who have severe disease or those who do not respond to treatment with steroids are often given powerful agents that suppress the immune system in an attempt to control the disease. However, these drugs have severe side effects. There is no evidence at the moment that the benefits of these drugs outweigh their side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Corticosteroid drugs can relieve inflammation, and in high doses they have a dramatic effect on the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. They are used only temporarily, however, because of serious adverse effects during long‐term use. The review found that corticosteroids in low doses are very effective. They are more effective than usual anti‐arthritis medications (non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs). The risk of harms needs to be considered, however, especially the risk of fractures and infections.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

RRMS is characterized by periods of disability (relapse) due to inflammation in the central nervous system. All research has shown that a "speeding up" of recovery is obtained by use of corticosteroids, given most often in intravenous form. If oral steroids worked as well as intravenous ones for relapse events, they would be easier to take and are more affordable.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Tuberculous bacteria have been suggested as a possible cause of Crohn's disease due to a similarity between Crohn's and tuberculous lesions when viewed under a microscope. Four studies examined the use of anti‐tuberculous therapy to reduce the chance of the disease recurring in patients with non‐active Crohn's disease. The results of these studies suggest that this treatment might be effective for this purpose. However, this finding has not been definitively proven, and anti‐tuberculous therapy should not be used to treat Crohn's disease without further study.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

We reviewed the evidence about the effects of corticosteroids on visual recovery of people with acute optic neuritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare disease whose cause is unknown and is a condition in which the glomeruli leak protein from the blood into the urine. It is described as focal because only some of the glomeruli become scarred (while others remain normal) and segmental as only part of an individual glomerulus is damaged. Over half of all persons with FSGS will develop chronic kidney failure within 10 years. Thus, immunosuppressive strategies are used to control proteinuria and prevent kidney failure. This systematic review identified four studies (108 participants) investigating immunosuppressive treatments for adults with biopsy‐proven FSGS. Adult patients treated with cyclosporin A in combination with prednisone were more likely to achieve partial remission of nephrotic syndrome compared with prednisone alone, however this result is based on only one small study. No data was available on the progression to kidney failure or death.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Myasthenia gravis is caused by the body's antibodies impairing transmission of nerve impulses to muscles, resulting in fluctuating weakness and fatigue. Acute attacks can be life threatening because of swallowing or breathing difficulties. Seven randomised controlled trials which included in all 199 participants are published. None fulfilled the presently accepted standards of a high‐quality trial. All these studies have risks of bias and have a weak statistical power. Limited evidence from randomised controlled trials suggests that corticosteroids offer short‐term benefit compared with placebo (dummy treatment). This supports the conclusions of observational studies and expert opinion. Limited evidence from randomised controlled trials does not show any difference in efficacy between corticosteroids and either azathioprine or intravenous immunoglobulin. All trials had design flaws which limit the strength of the conclusions. Further randomised controlled trials are needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Treatments for recurrent miscarriage when there are antibodies in the mothers blood.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic cholestatic disease of intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ducts, characterised by chronic periductal inflammation and sclerosis of the ducts, which results in segmental stenoses of bile ducts, cholestasis, fibrosis, and, ultimately, liver cirrhosis. Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis are at higher risk of cholangiocarcinoma as well as of colonic neoplasia, since primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in more than 80% of patients. Several therapeutic modalities have been proposed for primary sclerosing cholangitis, like ursodeoxycholic acid, glucocorticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents, but none has been successful in reversing the process of the disease. To date, liver transplantation is the only definite therapeutic solution for patients with advanced primary sclerosing cholangitis with liver cirrhosis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

The optimal management of pregnant women with a previous child affected by fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia remains unclear.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia (WM) is an uncommon B‐cell lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by bone marrow infiltration and production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. It is a kind of non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma which can lead to death. Alkylating agents are believed to be effective in treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia for alleviating symptoms and elongating survival time. The review authors found one randomised controlled trial with 92 participants that considered fludarabine was superior to the alkylating agents‐containing regimen for pretreated/relapsed patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Lymphoma is a cancer that originates from cells of the immune system in the lymph nodes, called lymphocytes. Slow‐growing (indolent) lymphoma is a group of lymphomas characterised by slow and continuous growth, a high initial response rate to treatment that target lymphoma cells (chemotherapy or rituximab), but a relapsing and progressive disease course. It includes follicular lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, mantle cell lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma. With current therapy people with advanced‐stage indolent lymphoma will experience relapse of their disease. Bendamustine is a type of chemotherapy that can be given to people with indolent lymphoma.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (634)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (5)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...