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The most common form of arthritis. It is characterized by the breakdown of joint cartilage, leading to pain, stiffness, and disability.

Results: 1 to 20 of 95

Exercise, weight loss and osteoarthritis

Weight loss and exercise - both are often recommended to people with osteoarthritis. Losing weight can especially help people with osteoarthritis of the knee. Exercise therapies can relieve pain and improve mobility for people with knee or hip osteoarthritis.Painful osteoarthritis can make it more difficult to get enough exercise - and that can lead to weight gain. And if you gain more weight, it could make the osteoarthritis worse, especially if it affects your knees. But what results can be expected from losing weight? And what kind of exercise is suitable for people with osteoarthritis?Most of the people who took part in these studies had knee osteoarthritis. People with hip osteoarthritis only took part in the exercise therapy studies listed here.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 16, 2014

Can lavage and debridement help with osteoarthritis of the knee?

One option for treating osteoarthritis of the knee is arthroscopy to clean the surface of the knee joint and where necessary smooth the cartilage. But studies show that this surgery has no advantages over other non-operative treatments.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 16, 2014

Osteoarthritis: Overview

At first your knee just feels a little stiff in the morning, and then it starts hurting when you climb the stairs – lots of older people are familiar with that.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 16, 2014

Thermotherapy (heat treatment) for treating osteoarthritis of the knee

To answer this topic, scientists found and analyzed three studies. Over 170 people with osteoarthritis continue to take their medications but used hot, cold or ice packs/towels with or without massage or no treatment. The studies were not of high quality but this Cochrane review provides the best evidence we have today.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Joint lavage for osteoarthritis of the knee

‐ may not improve pain and function compared to a sham treatment or no treatment.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Interventions for treating osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or jaw joint is located in front of the ear on either side of the face. However, it is the only joint that the dentists and maxillofacial surgeons predominantly have to deal with. As with many of the other joints, the TMJ can be affected by osteoarthritis (OA). This is characterized by progressive destruction of the internal surfaces of the joint which can result in debilitating pain and joint noises. Several disorders other than OA may affect the TMJ and the correct diagnosis is important such that it can be matched with appropriate therapy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Balneotherapy or spa‐therapy for Osteoarthritis

‐ Spending time in a mineral bath compared to no treatment may improve pain and quality of life.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Acetaminophen for osteoarthritis

Fifteen studies of moderate to high quality were reviewed and provide the best evidence we have today. The studies tested almost 6000 people with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. The studies compared people who took 4000 mg of acetaminophen (Tylenol, Paracetamol) a day to people who took a placebo (fake pill) or non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Most studies lasted on average about 6 weeks.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Interventions for treating osteoarthritis of the big toe joint

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of interventions for osteoarthritis of the big toe joint.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis

In people with osteoarthritis of the hip, there is not enough evidence to be certain about whether the posterior (back) or the lateral (side) approach to total hip replacement surgery is better.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Therapeutic ultrasound for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of therapeutic ultrasound on knee or hip osteoarthritis. The previous version of this review concluded that therapeutic ultrasound had no benefit over fake therapeutic ultrasound in pain relief and functional status.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

S‐Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of S‐Adenosylmethionine on osteoarthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Arthroscopic debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of arthroscopic debridement (AD) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Tramadol for osteoarthritis

There is gold level evidence that to treat osteoarthritis, tramadol taken for up to three months may decrease pain, may improve stiffness and function and overall‐well being. Tramadol may cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, constipation, tiredness, and headache.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Glucosamine for osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis that can affect the hands, hips, shoulders and knees. In OA, the cartilage that protects the ends of the bones breaks down and causes pain and swelling. Drug and non‐drug treatments are used to relieve pain and/or swelling.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Viscosupplementation for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis worldwide. Hyaluronan and hylan (HA) products provide opportunity to treat OA in individual knee joints. To evaluate the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of HA products, in knee OA, we have conducted a systematic review using Cochrane methodology. The analyses support the contention that the HA class of products is superior to placebo. There is considerable between‐product, between‐variable and time‐dependent variability in the clinical response. The clinical effect for some products against placebo on some variables at some time points is in the moderate to large effect size range. In general, sample size restrictions preclude any definitive comment on the safety of the HA class of products, however, within the constraints of the trial designs employed, no major safety issues were detected. The analyses suggest that viscosupplements are comparable in efficacy to systemic forms of active intervention, with more local reactions but fewer systemic adverse events, and that HA products have more prolonged effects than IA corticosteroids. Overall, the aforementioned analyses support the use of the HA class of products in the treatment of knee OA.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Transcutaneous electrostimulation for osteoarthritis of the knee

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of transcutaneous electrostimulation on osteoarthritis of the knee.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Fixation options of total knee replacement for osteoarthritis and other non‐traumatic diseases

‐ The risk of future aseptic loosening with uncemented fixation is approximately half that of cemented fixation in people with knee osteoarthritis and other non‐traumatic diseases.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Guide for Adults

This guide can help you learn about options. It can help you come up with a treatment plan that works for you. This guide covers ways to help you feel better. It also covers research about treatments that usually don’t help.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 8, 2009

Rofecoxib for osteoarthritis

Editor's note: The anti‐inflammatory drug rofecoxib (Vioxx) was withdrawn from the market at the end of September 2004 after it was shown that long‐term use (greater than 18 months) could increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Further information is available at www.vioxx.com.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

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