Home > Search Results

Results: 4

Clear

Some patients develop abnormal excessive electrical activity of brain nerve cells. This is called seizure activity and may involve a small area of the brain or the whole brain, resulting in sudden dysfunction of the structures involved, such as shaking of the limbs. The seizure activity often results in jerky movements (convulsions) and usually lasts a few minutes. When there is either more than 30 minutes of continuous seizure activity; or there are two or more seizures in a row without recovery of full consciousness between two seizures, the condition is called status epilepticus, which is a medical emergency. Many drugs have been studied in the management of this condition. This review found that intravenous (injected into a vein) lorazepam is better than diazepam or phenytoin for immediate control of status epilepticus. In the treatment of serially occurring seizures, diazepam gel administered rectally is effective in controlling seizures. Intravenous lorazepam is better than intravenous diazepam or phenytoin for immediate control of status epilepticus. For pre‐hospital treatment, intramuscular midazolam is as effective as (probably more effective than) intravenous lorazepam in control of seizures and frequency of hospitalisation or intensive care admissions. There is a need to conduct more studies on other drugs routinely used for this condition.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Parkinson's is a disease of the nervous system that mostly affects older people. The disease can be very hard to live with because it severely restricts mobility and as a result makes daily activities increasingly difficult. Our topic provides you with information about symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, and life with the disease.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: April 8, 2015

One of the complications of long‐term treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with levodopa is the development of motor complications e.g. dyskinesia; a jerky, dance‐like movement of the body. Generally clinicians add on drugs (to the levodopa regimen) from one of the other three classes of anti‐Parkinsonian treatments available (e.g. dopamine agonists, catechol‐O‐methyl transferase inhibitors (COMTIs) or monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors (MAOBIs)). However, despite trials having shown that these drugs are beneficial compared to placebo, it remains unclear as to the best way to treat patients experiencing motor complications and, in particular, whether one class of drug may be more effective than another.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of childhood neuroblastoma.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 18, 2017

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (14)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...