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Treats depression.

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Major depression is characterised by a persistent low mood and loss of interest and pleasure. These symptoms are often accompanied by loss of appetite, insomnia, fatigue, poor concentration, inappropriate guilty feelings and even suicide. Depression was the third leading cause of disease burden among all diseases experienced by humankind in 2002. Antidepressants are used in treatment for major depression. They are the mainstay of treatment. Among them, mirtazapine is known to have a unique pharmacological profile and thus is supposed to differ in its efficacy and adverse effects profile in comparison with other antidepressants.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Symptoms of amphetamine withdrawal during the initial days of abstinence from chronic amphetamine use can prompt individuals to return to regular drug use. No medications demonstrate significant effects over placebo in reducing symptoms of acute amphetamine withdrawal.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Major depression is a severe mental illness characterised by a persistent and unreactive low mood and loss of all interest and pleasure, usually accompanied by a range of symptoms such as appetite change, sleep disturbance, fatigue, loss of energy, poor concentration, inappropriate guilt and morbid thoughts of death. Although medication and psychological treatments are both effective for major depression, antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment in moderate to severe major depression. However, head‐to‐head comparisons of such drugs provide contrasting findings as to whether they are effective.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is caused by collapse of the upper airway. The mainstay of medical treatment is continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP), delivered through a mask during sleep, aiming to keep the airway opened. Drug therapy has been proposed for individuals with mild OSA and those intolerant of CPAP.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Depression is the fourth leading cause of disease burden worldwide and is expected to show a rising trend over the next 20 years. Depression is associated with a marked personal, social and economic morbidity, loss of functioning and productivity, and creates significant demands on service providers in terms of workload. Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment. During the last 20 years, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have progressively become the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Sertraline, one of the first SSRIs introduced in the market, is a potent and specific inhibitor of serotonin uptake into the presynaptic terminal, with a modest activity as inhibitor of dopamine uptake. In the present review we assessed the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of sertraline in comparison with all other antidepressants in the acute‐phase treatment of major depression. Fifty‐nine randomised controlled trials (about 10,000 participants) were included in the review. The review showed evidence of differences in efficacy, acceptability and tolerability between sertraline and other antidepressants, with meta‐analyses highlighting a trend in favour of sertraline over other antidepressants, both in terms of efficacy and acceptability, in a homogeneous sample of clinical trials, using conservative statistical methods. The included studies did not report on all the outcomes that were pre‐specified in the protocol of this review. Outcomes of clear relevance to patients and clinicians, in particular, patients and their carers' attitudes to treatment, their ability to return to work and resume normal social functioning, were not reported in the included studies. Nevertheless, based on currently available evidence, results from this review suggest that sertraline might be a strong candidate as the initial choice of antidepressant in people with acute major depression.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

How do drugs for fibromyalgia compare in improving symptoms?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: June 12, 2011

Depression is a severe mental illness characterised by a persistent low mood and loss of all interest and pleasure, usually accompanied by a range of symptoms such as appetite change, sleep disturbance and poor concentration. The predominant treatment options for depression are drugs and psychological therapies, but antidepressant drugs are the most common treatment for moderate to severe depression. Fluoxetine, one of the first new generation antidepressants, is an extremely popular drug treatment for depression. However, findings from studies comparing fluoxetine with other antidepressants are controversial. In this systematic review, the efficacy and tolerability of fluoxetine was compared with other antidepressants for the acute treatment of depression.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Major depression is a severe mental illness characterised by a persistent and unreactive low mood and loss of all interest and pleasure, usually accompanied by a range of symptoms including appetite change, sleep disturbance, fatigue, loss of energy, poor concentration, psychomotor symptoms, inappropriate guilt and morbid thoughts of death. Antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment in moderate‐to‐severe major depression. During the last 20 years, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have progressively become the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Citalopram, one of the first SSRIs introduced in the market, is the racemic mixture of S‐ and R‐enantiomer. In the present review we assessed the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of citalopram in comparison with all other antidepressants in the acute‐phase treatment of major depression. Thirty‐seven randomised controlled trials (more than 6000 participants) were included in the present review. In terms of efficacy, citalopram was more efficacious than other reference compounds like paroxetine or reboxetine, but worse than escitalopram. In terms of side effects, citalopram was more acceptable than older antidepressants, like tricyclics. Based on these findings, we conclude that clinicians should focus on practical or clinically relevant considerations including differences in efficacy and side‐effect profiles.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Expert-reviewed information summary about the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of depression in adults and children who have cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 8, 2017

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