Home > Search Results

Results: 9

Clear

We found lots of evidence to show fungal skin infections of the skin of the feet (athlete's foot or tinea pedis) are effectively managed by over the counter topical antifungal creams, lotions and gels. The most effective topical agent was terbinafine. Other topical agents such as azoles, ciclopiroxolamine, butenafine, tolnaftate and undecanoate were also effective in curing athlete's foot.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 18, 2007

Nail fungus is very common. Experts think that it often develops from untreated athlete's foot. It takes time to get rid of brittle, discolored, or thickened nails. Local treatment using nail polish can take up to a year. Tablets take effect more quickly, but have more side effects.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 14, 2015

We aimed to find out which medications, taken by mouth for at least six weeks, are the most effective at curing fungal infection of the toenail, a condition that is known as onychomycosis, in people of any age. We compared these medications to each other or placebo (an inactive drug or treatment).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 14, 2017

Nail fungus can be very persistent. Topical treatment with nail polish may last as long as one year. Tablets for treating fungal nail infections usually have to be taken for several weeks or months. They are much more effective than topical treatments, but they have more side effects.Crumbly nails and a whitish-yellowish to brownish discoloration are typical signs of nail fungus. The nails may also become thicker and change shape. The affected part of the nail can become detached from the nail bed. Treatment options for nail fungus include nail polishes and creams as well as tablets. Nail polishes and creams are available in pharmacies without a prescription.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 14, 2015

The inadvertent transfer of micro‐organisms such as bacteria to a patient's wound site during surgery can result in a wound infection that is commonly called a surgical site infection (SSI). SSIs are one of the most common forms of health care‐associated infections for surgical patients. Around 1 in 20 surgical patients develop an SSI in hospital, and this proportion rises when people go home. SSIs result in delayed wound healing, increased hospital stays, increased use of antibiotics, unnecessary pain and, in extreme cases, the death of the patient, so their prevention is a key aim for health services.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: January 22, 2016

Athlete's foot is very common and usually does not cause any serious problems. But affected skin can crack, and be itchy and unattractive. The fungus can spread to the nails, and on rare occasions to other areas of skin. The infection can usually be treated effectively with creams, gels or sprays.Athlete's foot fungi grow particularly well in the areas between our toes. It is often moist and warm there, and the skin on our feet is also a good breeding ground for fungus. Topical treatment will usually clear up the infection within a few weeks. Tablets only have to be taken in exceptional cases.Good hygiene is also important so that other people do not become infected and to prevent the infection from returning. That includes regularly changing socks, towels and bedding and washing them at over 60 degrees Celsius.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 14, 2015

Nearly everyone has had experience with athlete’s foot. The warm and moist spaces between our toes are the perfect place for fungi to grow and spread, typically causing skin redness and cracking. It can be treated effectively with creams, gels and sprays. We provide information on the various treatments.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 14, 2015

Psoriasis is characterized by clearly defined patches of red and scaly skin. This non-contagious condition typically starts in adulthood and comes and goes in cycles. Living with the visible skin patches often affects people's emotional well-being too. There are various treatment options.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 18, 2017

Psoriatic arthritis is a condition that leads to pain and stiffness in joints. It can be caused by psoriasis, but sometimes occurs in people who don't have any visible psoriasis-related skin changes. Various treatments can relieve the symptoms and prevent damage to the joints.It is estimated that 20% of people who have psoriasis also develop pain and inflammation in certain joints at some point. The joints start hurting and may feel stiff for a while, particularly in the morning. Movement often makes the stiffness disappear within half an hour. The affected joints may also become swollen, feel warm and sensitive to the touch. If the small joints between the vertebrae (spine bones) are inflamed, it might cause back pain.Psoriatic arthritis can occur in many joints of the body. It often affects the hands, feet, elbows, knees, neck or vertebrae. More than five joints typically become inflamed, including the joints at the end of the fingers and toes. These joints are especially prone to becoming deformed in severe cases. Tendons and tendon sheaths can also become inflamed.Most people who have psoriatic arthritis also have nail psoriasis. This can lead to small dents in the nails, which may become thicker, change color or start peeling off too. Nail psoriasis is difficult to treat and sometimes mistaken for a fungal nail infection.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 18, 2017

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (97)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (1)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...