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Prevention and treatment regimens for recurrent corneal erosion

In recurrent corneal erosion repeated episodes of breakdown of the corneal surface produce disabling eye symptoms and predispose the cornea (the transparent part at the front of the eye) to infection. Recurrent corneal erosions may happen after trauma to the cornea. Management may be required to prevent the recurrence of the erosions following corneal trauma or once the diagnosis is made, or both. Most episodes of recurrent corneal erosion resolve with simple medical therapy such as topical eye drops and ointment. When such simple measures fail or recurrences become too frequent, alternative treatment strategies are required. This review included seven trials with a total of 443 participants. The trials were conducted in Germany, People's Republic of China, Japan, Sweden and three in the UK. The quality of the trials was poor and the authors found the level of evidence insufficient for the development of management guidelines. There was limited evidence that oral tetracycline or topical prednisolone, or both, and excimer laser ablation, may be effective treatments for recurrent corneal erosion. More good‐quality randomised controlled trials are needed to guide the management of recurrent corneal erosion.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Eye patches for corneal abrasion

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out what effect using an eye patch for corneal abrasions has on healing and pain relief compared with not patching. Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and found 12 studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Topical non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the treatment of pain in traumatic corneal abrasions

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out if topical (applied directly to the surface of the eye) non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for traumatic corneal abrasions reduce pain. Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question. We found nine studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Topical treatment with cyclosporine A eyedrops for inflammation of the surface of the eye

Atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) is an inflammatory disorder of the ocular surface that can be suffered by 67.5% of atopic dermatitis patients. It is a chronic condition that often requires long‐term treatment in order to avoid ocular complications that may lead to visual loss. This condition is frequently treated with steroid eyedrops, but long‐term treatment with such drugs can produce severe side effects, such as the development of cataracts, glaucoma or severe infections of the eye. Topical treatment with cyclosporine A (CsA) eyedrops may be useful to control signs and symptoms of atopic keratoconjunctivitis, and to reduce the need for steroid eyedrops.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Small objects in the eye: Overview

Riding a bike, doing home improvements - there are many situations where you can get something into your eye. If a foreign object gets into the eye, it can injure the cornea. Mild corneal erosions usually heal within a couple of hours or days. But how do you remove a foreign object from your eye? And when do you need to see a doctor?

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 7, 2014

Small objects in the eye: Minor eye scratches: Do they heal better with or without an eye patch?

Eye patches probably do not help small scratches to the cornea to heal faster, and may even slow down recovery and cause other problems.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 7, 2014

Amniotic membrane transplantation for the treatment of ocular burns

Ocular surface burns vary in severity from mild and self‐limiting to devastating injuries characterised by failure of regeneration of the ocular surface, leading to blindness and disfigurement. The historical use of amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) to treat eye burns during the acute phase has re‐emerged in recent years, although its precise effects on the healing process have not been proven by randomised controlled trials (RCTs). One RCT conducted in India included a subset of patients who fulfilled the criteria for analysis in this review. The participants included 68 men and women of all ages with chemical or thermal burns to the ocular surface, who were randomised to treatment with conventional medical therapy alone or to medical therapy and AMT in the first seven days after injury. Conventional medical therapy included topical steroids, antibiotics, sodium ascorbate, sodium citrate, tear substitutes and cycloplegic drops, and oral vitamin C. Pressure‐lowering drops and/or oral acetazolamide were prescribed if required. Data from the RCT were analysed to compare corneal wound closure rates by the 21st day after the injury and visual outcomes at final follow‐up. The burns were classified as moderate or severe. In the moderate category, the AMT group had a higher proportion of eyes with complete epithelial closure by day 21 (not statistically significant) and significantly better visual acuity at final follow‐up. There was a high risk of bias resulting from the uneven characteristics of the control and treatment eyes at presentation and from the failure to mask personnel and outcome assessors involved in the study. This reduced confidence in the study findings.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of medical interventions for treating people with traumatic hyphema.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Glaucoma: Overview

As we age, we may develop eye conditions that impair our eyesight or have more serious consequences. Glaucoma is one of these eye conditions, but early diagnosis and treatment can help delay loss of eyesight.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 3, 2016

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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