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Urinary catheter policies for long‐term bladder drainage

Some people use catheters to help them manage their bladder problems (such as leaking urine or not being able to pass urine). Catheters may be permanent urethral catheters (in the tube draining the bladder), suprapubic catheters (via the abdomen) or intermittent catheters (when a catheter is inserted via the urethra several times a day). No trials were found comparing these different methods with each other. Sometimes people using the catheters develop urinary tract infections. There was some weak evidence that using antibiotics all the time reduced the chance of having a urinary tract infection while using intermittent catheters, but there was not enough information about side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Can interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines prevent device‐related infections?

Healthcare‐associated infections (HAIs) are a major threat to patient safety, and are associated with mortality rates varying from 5% to 35%. Important risk factors associated with HAIs are the use of invasive medical devices (e.g. central lines, urinary catheters and mechanical ventilators) that breach the body's normal defence mechanisms, and poor staff adherence to infection prevention practices during insertion and care for the devices when in place.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Types of urethral catheters for management of short‐term voiding problems in hospitalised adults

Urethral catheters are small tubes passed into the bladder via the urethra (outlet for urine). They are often used for a short time after major surgery. Urethral catheters are also used if a person is unable to empty the bladder when they need to (urinary retention). They are also used for monitoring urine output in hospitalised patients. About half of all hospitalised adults who have urethral catheters for longer than a week will get a urinary tract infection (UTI).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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