Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 67

Obsessive-compulsive disorder: Treatment of obsessive-compulsive behavior

Obsessive-compulsive behavior can severely interfere with every day activities and make normal life virtually impossible. But there are treatments that can help deal with compulsions. These treatments include cognitive behavioral therapy in particular, but medication is also common.People with obsessive-compulsive behavior (OCD) are haunted by constant repetitive thoughts or feel compelled to do things that they realize are pointless and do not want to do. Some are so afraid of germs that they constantly wash their hands. Others might check whether they have really turned off the oven over and over again or constantly count to 20 without being able to stop.These kinds of compulsive thoughts and acts may seem excessive or strange. But they help people with OCD to calm down for a while. They themselves almost always realize that their behavior is causing problems, but it is difficult for them to stop for good on their own. When they try to suppress these urges, people with OCD may tense up or feel frightened. Psychotherapy and medications can help to manage this kind of behavior.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 10, 2014

Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of unusual cancers of childhood such as cancers of the head and neck, chest, abdomen, reproductive system, skin, and others.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 4, 2017

Pregnancy and birth: Depression after childbirth – What can help?

Pregnant women usually expect the days and weeks following the birth of their child to be a happy time. But many have also heard of the “baby blues”: sadness and severe mood swings that often start a few days after giving birth. If the sadness does not go away, it might be the start of depression.Depression after childbirth is called postnatal (or postpartum) depression. It is very similar to the kind of depression that can affect people in any phase of life. Except for one major difference: Mothers often feel very guilty and worry about not being able to care properly for their baby. Many mothers feel too ashamed to speak with others about how they are feeling. They are afraid of not living up to the idea of a “good mother” and might become more and more withdrawn. Some women say that they no longer recognize themselves.Taking care of a newborn baby is a real challenge. Some women do not get the emotional and practical help that they need. It is not always easy to deal with all of the changes that need to be made to care full-time for a new baby. Coping with the everyday stress and getting used to your new life can be very difficult – and sometimes it may even be depressing.But these phases usually do not last long and go away by themselves once things have settled down a bit. If it turns into a lasting depression, though, it can greatly affect the mother’s relationship with her child. So it is important to take deep unhappiness and mood swings after childbirth seriously, and get more support.The first step towards doing that is to accept that there is a problem. Sometimes people who are depressed do not realize that they need help. One of the features of depression is that it can be hard to recognize that you are depressed, and that your mood swings are no longer “normal.”Or you might feel so bad that you aren’t able to reach out for the help you need. So it might be a doctor, midwife, partner, friend or family member who realizes what is happening, and helps get more support.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 21, 2016

Smart Health Choices: Making Sense of Health Advice

This book aims to help consumers and practitioners develop the skills to assess health advice – and hopefully to make decisions that will improve the quality of their care. For some people, making better-informed decisions could be life saving. We hope that it will be useful if you are struggling to come to terms with an illness or injury, and the best ways of managing it. Or you may simply want to lead a healthier life, and may be wondering how to make sense of the often conflicting flood of health information that deluges us every day, through the media, and from our friends and health practitioners.

Hammersmith Press.

Version: 2008
Show search results within this document

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Overview

ADHD is a mental disorder in which children are especially inattentive, impulsive or hyperactive. Severe ADHD can cause major problems in the life and everyday routine of both the child and their family. But a number of different treatment options are available. In adulthood the symptoms are generally much less severe or may have disappeared completely.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 9, 2015

Comparing Talk Therapy and Other Depression Treatments With Antidepressant Medicines: A Review of the Research for Adults

What is depression? What have researchers found about how antidepressants compare with talk therapy (also called counseling) and other depression treatments (exercise programs, acupuncture, and dietary supplements)? What should I ask my health care professional about treating my depression?

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: September 13, 2016

Epilepsy: What to do if someone has an epileptic seizure

Most people are not sure how to react if someone has an epileptic seizure. The correct response is not that complicated, though. Just a few rules can help you remember what to do.There are different types of epileptic seizures. The best reaction will depend on the type and severity of the seizure as well as the general situation. The main thing is to stay calm and protect the person having the seizure from harm. Most seizures are not dangerous and pass within a few minutes.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 13, 2016

Reducing prescribed opioid use in chronic non‐cancer pain

About 1 in 5 adults suffer from moderate or severe chronic pain that is not caused by cancer. Some people with this type of pain are treated with opioids (typically with drugs like morphine, codeine, oxycodone, fentanyl, or buprenorphine, either as tablets or as patches placed on the skin). It is not unusual for this medication to be ineffective or to stop working over time, and, sometimes, effective pain relief is not achieved despite doses being increased. Stopping using opioid drugs is not easy, especially when they have been used for some time, because stopping abruptly can cause unpleasant side effects. This review looked for high quality studies (randomised controlled trials) of treatments to help people safely stop taking opioids prescribed for their pain. Only two studies were found, and they investigated only 86 people. No conclusions can be drawn from this small amount of information. Non‐randomised studies, not included in this review, do indicate that in most people intensive rehabilitation packages can bring about major reduction in opioid use. Reducing prescribed opioid use in chronic non‐cancer pain is an important topic in need of more research.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Medications for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Various medications can somewhat delay the loss of mental abilities and independence. But they can also have side effects. It is not clear whether any of the medications are better than the others.Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. People who have dementia become forgetful and find it increasingly difficult to understand complex issues or express themselves in words. Their orientation in space and time gets worse and they need more and more support in everyday life. The speed at which the disease progresses varies greatly from person to person.In Alzheimer’s disease, more and more nerve cells in the brain die as time goes on. There is currently no way to cure the disease or stop its progression. But there are various medications which aim to maintain people’s memory and independence in everyday life for longer. Non-drug strategies include things like memory training or encouraging social activities.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: August 21, 2013

Can oseltamivir (Tamiflu) prevent complications?

In some groups of people, having the flu can sometimes lead to serious complications such as pneumonia. Drugs like oseltamivir (trade name: Tamiflu) aim to prevent things from turning serious. But research has only shown that taking oseltamivir might make general flu symptoms go away a bit sooner.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: November 3, 2016

Delirium (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about delirium as a complication of cancer or its treatment. Supportive care and pharmacologic approaches to the management of delirium are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 9, 2016

Depression (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of depression in adults and children who have cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 30, 2016

Obstructive sleep apnea: Overview

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) might be the cause if you feel absolutely beat in the morning despite getting enough sleep. Most people with sleep apnea snore and have breathing pauses at night that often go unnoticed. This can cause problems in your daily routine and increase your risk of developing other conditions.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 30, 2015

Preventing depression in children and young people

Children and teenagers can feel sad, down or distressed from time to time. But if these feelings last longer and are more intense than usual, they might be depressed.Depression is not unusual in young people, but it can be prevented. Children and teenagers often have a lot of difficult issues to cope with, like trouble with parents, bad grades at school, losing friends, feeling unhappy with themselves or their bodies, and being lovesick for the first time. Problems and difficult situations can make them feel sad, down or distressed. That is perfectly normal. But depression is more than just being in a bad mood or having a bad day, and can become a serious illness.However, depression can be prevented in children and teenagers. Depression often has more than one cause. It usually comes from a combination of biological processes in the body, mental factors and events in a person's life. Not all of these factors can be influenced, but young people can learn how to cope better with the challenges in their life. This could help keep them from slipping into depression in difficult situations.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 18, 2012

Enlarged hemorrhoids: Overview

Did you know that we all have hemorrhoids? Hemorrhoids are normal “cushions” of tissue filled with blood vessels, found at the end of the rectum. They are only a problem if they become enlarged. A lot of people have enlarged hemorrhoids: It is estimated that about half of all adults over the age of 30 are affected.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 29, 2014

Early versus late antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with epilepsy in remission

Epilepsy is a disorder where recurrent seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges in the brain. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used to prevent these seizures but have long‐term side effects. When in remission (seizure free), it may be best to stop using the drugs but the right time to withdraw them is still unclear.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the health problems that continue or appear after cancer treatment has ended.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 11, 2016

Sleep Disorders (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about causes and management of sleep disorders in people with cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 27, 2016

Childhood Craniopharyngioma Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of childhood craniopharyngioma

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 26, 2016

Gastrointestinal Complications (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about constipation, impaction, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea as complications of cancer or its treatment. The management of these problems is discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: June 6, 2016

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (140)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (2)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...