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Strategies To De-escalate Aggressive Behavior in Psychiatric Patients [Internet]

To compare the effectiveness of strategies to prevent and de-escalate aggressive behaviors in psychiatric patients in acute care settings, including interventions aimed specifically at reducing use of seclusion and restraint.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: July 2016
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Antiemetics For Adults Experiencing Opioid-Induced Nausea: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness, Benefits and Harms, and Guidelines [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to retrieve and review existing evidence comparing the efficacy of different antiemetics for treatment of opioid-induced nausea. This report also aims to retrieve and review the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness, benefits and harms, cost-effectiveness and evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of dimenhydrinate and ondansetron for adult patients experiencing opioid-induced nausea.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: April 9, 2014
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Bipolar Disorder: The Management of Bipolar Disorder in Adults, Children and Adolescents, in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on the treatment and management of bipolar disorder. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, patients and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guidelines will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning high quality care for those with bipolar disorder while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for patients and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2006
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Drug Misuse: Opioid Detoxification

The guideline on Drug misuse: opioid detoxification, commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, sets out clear, evidence-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to work with people who misuse opioids to significantly improve their treatment and care, and to deliver detoxification safely and effectively. Of the estimated 4 million people in the UK who use illicit drugs each year, approximately 50,000 misuse opioids (such as heroin, opium, morphine, codeine and methadone). Opioid misuse presents a considerable health risk and can lead to significant social problems. This NICE guideline is an important tool in helping people to overcome their drug problem.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2008
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Drug Class Review: Antiepileptic Drugs for Indications Other Than Epilepsy: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Antiepileptic drugs have been used beyond treatment of seizure disorders since the 1960s. As new antiepileptic drugs have become available, there has been interest in how they compare with older therapies (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate) and each other in disorders where conventional pharmacotherapy has typically been suboptimal and limited by drug-related toxicity. The objective of this report is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of antiepileptic drugs used for bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia, migraine prophylaxis, and chronic pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
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Sickle Cell Acute Painful Episode: Management of an Acute Painful Sickle Cell Episode in Hospital

This guideline addresses the management of an acute painful sickle cell episode in patients presenting to hospital until discharge. This includes the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, identifying the signs and symptoms of acute complications, skills and settings for managing an acute painful episode, and the information and support needs of patients.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (UK).

Version: June 2012
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Interventions for adult Eustachian tube dysfunction: a systematic review

This systematic review found insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of any intervention for adults with Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD). The quality of the evidence was generally poor. Evidence was insufficient to allow recommendation of a trial of any particular intervention. Further research is needed to establish a definition of ETD, its relation to broader middle ear ventilation problems and clear diagnostic criteria.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2014
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Alcohol Use Disorders: Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Physical Complications [Internet]

Alcohol is the most widely used psychotropic drug in the industrialised world; it has been used for thousands of years as a social lubricant and anxiolytic. In the UK, it is estimated that 24% of adult men and 13% of adult women drink in a hazardous or harmful way. Levels of hazardous and harmful drinking are lowest in the central and eastern regions of England (21–24% of men and 10–14% of women). They are highest in the north (26–28% of men, 16–18% of women). Hazardous and harmful drinking are commonly encountered amongst hospital attendees; 12% of emergency department attendances are directly related to alcohol whilst 20% of patients admitted to hospital for illnesses unrelated to alcohol are drinking at potentially hazardous levels. Continued hazardous and harmful drinking can result in dependence and tolerance with the consequence that an abrupt reduction in intake might result in development of a withdrawal syndrome. In addition, persistent drinking at hazardous and harmful levels can also result in damage to almost every organ or system of the body. Alcohol-attributable conditions include liver damage, pancreatitis and the Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Key areas in the investigation and management of these conditions are covered in this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management [Internet]

This guideline covers adult patients (18 years and older) in a hospital setting and adults (18 and older) in long-term residential care. The guideline addresses: modifiable risk factors (‘clinical factors’) to identify people at risk of developing delirium; diagnosis of delirium in acute, critical and long-term care; as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for a) reducing the incidence of delirium and its consequences, and b) to reduce the severity, duration and consequences of delirium in people who develop the condition.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2010
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Drug Class Review: Newer Antihistamines: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Antihistamines inhibit the effects of histamine at H1 receptors. They have a number of clinical indications including allergic conditions (e.g., rhinitis, dermatoses, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, allergic conjunctivitis, hypersensitivity reactions to drugs, mild transfusion reactions, and urticaria), chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), motion sickness, vertigo, and insomnia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: May 2010
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Diarrhoea and Vomiting Caused by Gastroenteritis: Diagnosis, Assessment and Management in Children Younger than 5 Years

When young children suddenly experience the onset of diarrhoea, with or without vomiting, infective gastroenteritis is by far the most common explanation. A range of enteric viruses, bacteria and protozoal pathogens may be responsible. Viral infections account for most cases in the developed world. Gastroenteritis is very common, with many infants and young children experiencing more than one episode in a year.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: April 2009
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Antenatal and Postnatal Mental Health: Clinical Management and Service Guidance: Updated edition

The guideline makes recommendations for the use of pharmacological, psychological and service-level interventions. It aims to:

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: December 2014
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Headaches: Diagnosis and Management of Headaches in Young People and Adults [Internet]

Many non-specialist healthcare professionals can find the diagnosis of headache difficult, and both people with headache and their healthcare professionals can be concerned about possible serious underlying causes. This leads to variability in care and may mean that people with headaches are not always offered the most appropriate treatments. People with headache alone are unlikely to have a serious underlying disease. Comparisons between people with headache referred to secondary care and those treated in primary care show that they do not differ in terms of headache impact or disability.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: September 2012
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Atopic Eczema in Children: Management of Atopic Eczema in Children from Birth up to the Age of 12 Years

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory itchy skin condition that develops in early childhood in the majority of cases. It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation (flares, which may occur as frequently as two or three per month) and remissions, except for severe cases where it may be continuous. Certain patterns of atopic eczema are recognised. In infants, atopic eczema usually involves the face and extensor surfaces of the limbs and, while it may involve the trunk, the napkin area is usually spared. A few infants may exhibit a discoid pattern (circular patches). In older children flexural involvement predominates, as in adults. Diagnostic criteria are discussed in Chapter 3. As with other atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), atopic eczema often has a genetic component. In atopic eczema, inherited factors affect the development of the skin barrier, which can lead to exacerbation of the disease by a large number of trigger factors, including irritants and allergens. Many cases of atopic eczema clear or improve during childhood while others persist into adulthood, and some children who have atopic eczema `will go on to develop asthma and/or allergic rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The epidemiology of atopic eczema is considered in Chapter 5, and the impact of the condition on children and their families/caregivers is considered in Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2007
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Intrapartum Care: Care of Healthy Women and Their Babies During Childbirth

The guideline is intended to cover the care of healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies entering labour at low risk of developing intrapartum complications. In addition, recommendations are included that address the care of women who start labour as ‘low risk’ but who go on to develop complications. These include the care of women with prelabour rupture of membranes at term, care of the woman and baby when meconium is present, indications for continuous cardiotocography, interpretation of cardiotocography traces, and management of retained placenta and postpartum haemorrhage. Aspects of intrapartum care for women at risk of developing intrapartum complications are covered by a range of guidelines on specific conditions (see section 1.8) and a further guideline is planned on intrapartum care of women ‘at high risk’ of complications during pregnancy and the intrapartum period.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2014
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Generalised Anxiety Disorder in Adults: Management in Primary, Secondary and Community Care

This clinical guideline is an update of NICE’s previous guidance on generalised anxiety disorder. It was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, and sets out clear evidence- and consensus-based recommendations for healthcare professionals on how to treat and manage generalised anxiety disorder in adults.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2011
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Constipation in Children and Young People: Diagnosis and Management of Idiopathic Childhood Constipation in Primary and Secondary Care

Without early diagnosis and treatment, an acute episode of constipation can lead to anal fissure and become chronic. By the time the child or young person is seen they may be in a vicious cycle. Children and young people and their families are often given conflicting advice and practice is inconsistent, making treatment potentially less effective and frustrating for all concerned. Early identification of constipation and effective treatment can improve outcomes for children and young people. This guideline provides strategies based on the best available evidence to support early identification, positive diagnosis and timely, effective management. Implementation of this guideline will provide a consistent, coordinated approach and will improve outcomes for children and young people.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Enabling Medication Management Through Health Information Technology

The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2011
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Borderline Personality Disorder: Treatment and Management

The guideline on Borderline Personality Disorder, commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, sets out clear, evidence- and consensus-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to treat and manage borderline personality disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2009
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The Management of Inadvertent Perioperative Hypothermia in Adults [Internet]

Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia is a common but preventable complication of perioperative procedures, which is associated with poor outcomes for patients. Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia should be distinguished from the deliberate induction of hypothermia for medical reasons, which is not covered by this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care (UK).

Version: April 2008
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