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Drug Class Review: Direct Renin Inhibitors, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers: Final Report [Internet]

The renin-angiotensin system is a complex biologic system between the heart, brain, blood vessels, and kidneys that leads to the production of biologically active agents, including angiotensin I and II and aldosterone, which act together to impact a variety of bodily functions including blood vessel tone, sodium balance, and glomerular filtration pressure. The multiple and varied effects of these agents allows the renin-angiotensin system to play a wide role in the pathology of hypertension, cardiovascular health, and renal function. Our ability to begin to intervene upon the complex cycle of hormone and other biochemical agent production within the renin-angiotensin system began with the advent of the first orally active ACE-I (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor), captopril, in 1981. AIIRAs (angiotensin II receptor blockers) were developed as an alternative to ACE-I, and block the interaction between angiotensin II and the angiotensin receptor. Losartan, the first commercially available AIIRA, was approved for clinical use in 1995. The goal of this report is to compare the effectiveness and harms between aliskiren and placebo and between AIIRAs and ACEIs in the treatment of diagnosed coronary heart disease, hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: January 2010
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Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
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MI - Secondary Prevention: Secondary Prevention in Primary and Secondary Care for Patients Following a Myocardial Infarction: Partial Update of NICE CG48 [Internet]

Myocardial infarction (MI) remains one of the most dramatic presentations of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complete occlusion of the artery often produces myocardial necrosis and the classical picture of a heart attack with severe chest pain, electrocardiographic (ECG) changes of ST-segment elevation, and an elevated concentration of myocardial specific proteins in the circulation. Such people are described as having a ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Intermittent or partial occlusion produces similar, but often less severe clinical features, although no or transient and undetected ST elevation. Such cases are described as a non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). People who have suffered from either of these conditions are amenable to treatment to reduce the risk of further MI or other manifestations of vascular disease, secondary prevention.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2013
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Hypertension: The Clinical Management of Primary Hypertension in Adults: Update of Clinical Guidelines 18 and 34 [Internet]

NICE first issued guidance for the management of hypertension in primary care in 2004. This was followed by a rapid update of the pharmacological treatment chapter of the guideline in 2006. The current partial update of the hypertension guideline is in response to the regular five year review cycle of existing NICE guidance. It began with a scoping exercise which identified key areas of the existing guideline for which new evidence had emerged that was likely to influence or change existing guideline recommendations.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2011
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Multimorbidity: Assessment, Prioritisation and Management of Care for People with Commonly Occurring Multimorbidity

Multimorbidity is usually defined as when an individual has two or more long-term conditions. Measuring the prevalence of multimorbidity is not straightforward since this will vary depending on which conditions are counted, but all recent studies show that multimorbidity is common, becomes more common as people age, and is more common in people from less affluent areas. A recent large UK based study found that 42% of the population had at least one of the 40 conditions counted, and 23% had multimorbidity. Two-thirds of people aged 65 years or over had multimorbidity, and 47% had three or more conditions. People living in the most deprived areas had double the rate of multimorbidity in middle age than those living in the most affluent areas. Put another way, they developed multimorbidity 10-15 years before their more affluent peers. The recognition of multimorbidity associated with socioeconomic depreivation is particularly important as NHS England has a legal duty to have regard to the need to reduce health inequalities. Whereas rates of multimorbidity in older people was largely due to higher rates of physical conditions, in the less affluent multimorbidity was due to combinations of physical and mental health conditions was common.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: September 2016
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Chronic Kidney Disease (Partial Update): Early Identification and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults in Primary and Secondary Care

The Renal National Service Framework (NSF), and the subsequent NICE Clinical Practice Guideline for early identification and management of adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary and secondary care (CG73), served to emphasise the change in focus in renal medicine from treatment of established kidney disease to earlier identification and prevention of kidney disease.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2014
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Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Assessment and Management

This guideline covers identifying, diagnosing and assessing disease severity in adults, children and young people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It also covers both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, disease monitoring and the risk of extra-hepatic conditions associated with NAFLD.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2016
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Acute Heart Failure: Diagnosing and Managing Acute Heart Failure in Adults

The need for this guideline was identified as the NICE guidelines on chronic heart failure were being updated. We recognised at this time that there were important aspects of the diagnosis and management of acute heart failure that were not being addressed by the chronic heart failure guideline, which focussed on long term management rather than the immediate care of someone who is acutely unwell as a result of heart failure. The aim of this guideline is to provide guidance to the NHS on the diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 2014
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Hypertension in Pregnancy: The Management of Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2010
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Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs), Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists (ARBs), and Direct Renin Inhibitors for Treating Essential Hypertension: An Update [Internet]

A 2007 comparative effectiveness review (CER) evaluated the long-term benefits and harms of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) versus angiotensin II receptor blockers/antagonists (ARBs) for treating essential hypertension in adults. Since then, significant additional research has been published comparing these agents, and direct renin inhibitors (DRIs) have been introduced to the market. We sought to update 2007 CER on ACEIs versus ARBs and expand this to include comparisons with DRIs.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2011
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Stable Angina: Methods, Evidence & Guidance [Internet]

Angina is pain or constricting discomfort that typically occurs in the front of the chest (but may radiate to the neck, shoulders, jaw or arms) and is brought on by physical exertion or emotional stress. It is the main symptomatic manifestation of myocardial ischaemia and is usually caused by obstructive coronary artery disease restricting oxygen delivery to the cardiac myocytes. Other factors may exacerbate angina either by further restricting oxygen delivery (for example severe anaemia) or by increasing oxygen demand (for example left ventricular hypertrophy). Angina symptoms are associated with other cardiac disease such as aortic stenosis but the management of angina associated with non-coronary artery disease is outside the scope of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guidelines Centre (UK).

Version: July 2011
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Chronic Heart Failure: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management in Primary and Secondary Care: Partial Update [Internet]

This guideline is a partial update of NICE Guideline No 5: Chronic Heart Failure - national clinical guideline for diagnosis and management in primary and secondary care (2003). The aim of the 2003 guideline was to offer best practice advice on the care of adult patients (aged 18 years or older) who have symptoms or a diagnosis of chronic heart failure. It defined the most effective combination of symptoms, signs and investigations required to establish a diagnosis of heart failure, and those which would influence therapy or provide important prognostic information. It also gave guidance on the treatment, monitoring and support of patients with heart failure.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2010
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Headaches: Diagnosis and Management of Headaches in Young People and Adults [Internet]

Many non-specialist healthcare professionals can find the diagnosis of headache difficult, and both people with headache and their healthcare professionals can be concerned about possible serious underlying causes. This leads to variability in care and may mean that people with headaches are not always offered the most appropriate treatments. People with headache alone are unlikely to have a serious underlying disease. Comparisons between people with headache referred to secondary care and those treated in primary care show that they do not differ in terms of headache impact or disability.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: September 2012
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Diabetes in Pregnancy: Management of Diabetes and Its Complications from Preconception to the Postnatal Period

Clinical guidelines have been defined as ‘systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific conditions’. This clinical guideline concerns the management of diabetes and its complications from preconception to the postnatal period. It has been developed with the aim of providing guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: February 2015
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Acute Kidney Injury: Prevention, Detection and Management Up to the Point of Renal Replacement Therapy [Internet]

Acute kidney injury (AKI), previously called acute renal failure, has chiefly been described as a syndrome since World War 2. Traditionally ‘acute renal failure’ was regarded as a less common organ failure, with patients typically requiring dialysis and managed by nephrologists. This view has now been overturned. AKI encompasses a wide spectrum of injury to the kidneys, not just ‘kidney failure’. It is a common problem amongst hospitalised patients, in particular the elderly population whose numbers are increasing as people live longer. Such patients are usually under the care of doctors practicing in specialties other than nephrology. For normal function the kidneys require a competent circulation. Conversely, it is known that renal function is vulnerable to even relative or quite modest hypotension or hypovolaemia. Hence AKI is a feature of many severe illnesses. Although these illnesses may affect many organs, the simple process of monitoring urine output and/or creatinine permits detection of AKI.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2013
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