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Laxatives for the management of childhood constipation

Functional childhood constipation is a common problem. The term functional constipation is used when no underlying organic cause can be identified for the symptoms. Symptoms typically include decreased frequency of bowel movements, faecal incontinence and a change in consistency of stools. Despite the widespread use of laxatives by health professionals to manage constipation in children, there has been a long standing lack of evidence to support this practice.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Constipation in Children and Young People: Diagnosis and Management of Idiopathic Childhood Constipation in Primary and Secondary Care

Without early diagnosis and treatment, an acute episode of constipation can lead to anal fissure and become chronic. By the time the child or young person is seen they may be in a vicious cycle. Children and young people and their families are often given conflicting advice and practice is inconsistent, making treatment potentially less effective and frustrating for all concerned. Early identification of constipation and effective treatment can improve outcomes for children and young people. This guideline provides strategies based on the best available evidence to support early identification, positive diagnosis and timely, effective management. Implementation of this guideline will provide a consistent, coordinated approach and will improve outcomes for children and young people.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adults: Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Primary Care [Internet]

This guideline covers areas relevant to the diagnosis and management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) reflecting the complete patient journey, from the person presenting with IBS symptoms, positive diagnosis and management, targeted at symptom control. The guideline incorporates Cochrane reviews, published NICE clinical and public health guidance, Health Technology Assessment reports, systematic and health economic reviews produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care. Recommendations are based on clinical and cost effectiveness evidence, and where this is insufficient, the GDG used all available information sources and experience to make consensus recommendations using nominal group technique.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care (UK).

Version: February 2008
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Dioctyl Sulfosuccinate or Docusate (Calcium or Sodium) for the Prevention or Management of Constipation: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness [Internet]

Constipation has many definitions and is often described differently depending on the population queried. Many physicians define constipation as a reduction in the frequency of bowel movements to fewer than three times per week while patients identify more with the symptoms associated with constipation such as difficulty passing stool, hard stool consistency, feelings of abdominal cramping, and feelings of incomplete stool passage. Causes of constipation may be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other factors such as diet, medication, or medical conditions. Constipation can affect anyone as a minor annoyance but up to a quarter of the population experiences it chronically or severely. It can substantially affect quality of life and be debilitating. It is estimated that between 2% to 27% of the population are affected depending upon the definition of constipation used.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: June 26, 2014
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Eating Disorders: Core Interventions in the Treatment and Management of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Related Eating Disorders

This guideline has been developed to advise on the identification, treatment and management of the eating disorders anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related conditions. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary group of health care professionals, patients and their representatives, and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning high quality care for those with eating disorders while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for patients and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2004

Treatments for Constipation: A Review of Systematic Reviews [Internet]

Constipation has many definitions and is often described differently depending on the population queried. Physicians may define constipation as a reduction in the frequency of bowel movements to fewer than three times per week while patients identify more with the symptoms associated with constipation such as difficulty passing stool, hard stool consistency, feelings of abdominal cramping, and feelings of incomplete stool passage. Causes of constipation may be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other factors such as diet, medication, or medical conditions. Constipation can affect anyone as a minor annoyance but up to a quarter of the population experiences it chronically or severely. It can substantially affect quality of life and be debilitating. It is estimated that between 2% to 27% of the population are affected depending upon the definition of constipation used.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: November 17, 2014

Drug Class Review: Constipation Drugs: Final Report [Internet]

Chronic constipation is a disorder characterized by unsatisfactory defecation that results from infrequent stools, difficult stool passage, or both over a time period of at least 12 weeks. In this report, we review the general and comparative effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of drugs for chronic constipation. Our review covers the use of the following in adults and children with chronic constipation and Irritable Bowel Syndrome, constipation-predominant (IBS-C): docusate calcium, docusate sodium, lactulose, lubiprostone, polyethylene glycol 3350, psyllium, and tegaserod.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: September 2007
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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