Home > Search Results

Results: 10

Vitamin D compounds for people with chronic kidney disease not requiring dialysis

People with lower kidney function (chronic kidney disease; CKD) develop changes in circulating blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. The kidney gradually loses the ability to remove phosphorus from the blood and cannot activate adequate amounts of vitamin D to maintain normal levels of calcium. The parathyroid gland senses these changes and compensates to increase calcium by elevating production and release of parathyroid hormone (PTH). These metabolic changes alter bone metabolism to release calcium and accordingly lead to bone abnormalities including altered bone production. In turn, bony changes may result in bone deformation, bone pain, and altered risks of fracture.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Vitamin D compounds for people with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis

People with reduced kidney function (chronic kidney disease; CKD) develop changes in circulating blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. The kidney gradually loses the ability to remove phosphorus from the blood and cannot activate adequate amounts of vitamin D, to maintain normal levels of calcium. The parathyroid gland senses these changes and compensates to increase calcium by elevating production and release of parathyroid hormone. These metabolic changes alter bone metabolism to release calcium and accordingly lead to bone abnormalities including altered bone production. Consequently bone deformation, bone pain, and altered risks of fracture may occur.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions for metabolic bone disease in children with chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) resulting in reduced kidney function and the need for dialysis and kidney transplant is associated with abnormalities in serum calcium and phosphorus levels leading to high levels of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) and to bone disease. This may result in bone deformities, bone pain, fractures and reduced growth rates. Commonly used treatments (vitamin D compounds and phosphate binders) aim to prevent or correct these outcomes. However, these treatments may raise levels of blood calcium, allow calcium and phosphorus deposition in blood vessels and lead to early cardiovascular disease, which is known to be a problem in adults with CKD.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Multiple Sclerosis: Management of Multiple Sclerosis in Primary and Secondary Care

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an acquired chronic immune-mediated inflammatory condition of the central nervous system (CNS), affecting both the brain and spinal cord. It affects approximately 100,000 people in the UK. It is the commonest cause of serious physical disability in adults of working age.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 2014
Show search results within this document

Lipid Modification: Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and the Modification of Blood Lipids for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

This guideline updates for primary prevention, the NICE technology appraisal, ‘Statins for the prevention of cardiovascular events’ (TA94, 2007) and reviews and updates the recommendations made in the NICE guideline Lipid Modification (CG67, 2008) for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The scope for this guideline was limited to the identification and assessment of CVD risk and to the assessment and modification of lipids in people at risk of CVD, or people with known CVD. The guideline development group wishes to make clear that lipid modification should take place as part of a programme of risk reduction which also include attention to the management of all other known CVD risk factors.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2014
Show search results within this document

Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008
Show search results within this document

Chronic Kidney Disease (Partial Update): Early Identification and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults in Primary and Secondary Care

The Renal National Service Framework (NSF), and the subsequent NICE Clinical Practice Guideline for early identification and management of adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary and secondary care (CG73), served to emphasise the change in focus in renal medicine from treatment of established kidney disease to earlier identification and prevention of kidney disease.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2014
Show search results within this document

Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy: a systematic review

Study found insufficient evidence to support definite clinical recommendations regarding vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy. Although there is modest evidence to support a relationship between maternal 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] status and offspring birthweight, bone mass and serum calcium concentrations, these findings were limited by their observational nature (birthweight, bone mass) or risk of bias and low quality (calcium concentrations).

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2014
Show search results within this document

A review of intravenous versus oral vitamin D hormone therapy in hemodialysis patients

This review compared intravenous and oral vitamin D regimens for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in haemodialysis patients. The authors concluded that there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion about the comparative safety and efficacy of oral and intravenous regimens. These conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Vitamin D treatment and mortality in chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The authors concluded that based on observational evidence, therapies with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and analogues were associated with reduced mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, particularly in those suffering from secondary hyperparathyroidism. Due to the nature of observational studies, the findings should be considered to be preliminary.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (6)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...