Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 55

Calcium channel blocking drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive wasting condition of muscles which starts in early childhood, leads to dependence on a wheelchair by the age of thirteen and respiratory failure by late teens. The condition is due to absence of dystrophin, a large muscle protein that has several functions within muscle cells. We know that calcium molecules build up in the muscle cells of people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and this is associated with cell death. The rationale behind this review was to ascertain whether randomised controlled trials using drugs that block calcium entry into muscle would result in a reduction in progression of the condition. Although these trials were conducted over ten years ago a systematic review was not done at that time, and so a potential effect of calcium blocking drugs (antagonists) on the course of DMD may have been missed. If it were to exist, calcium antagonists might be an effective treatment in their own right or, more likely, could be used in combination with newer treatments such as corticosteroids or potential treatments such as gene related therapies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Systematic review of the use of topical diltiazem compared with glyceryltrinitrate for the nonoperative management of chronic anal fissure

The review concluded that diltiazem and glyceryl trinitrate were equally effective in the initial healing of chronic anal fissure but diltiazem should be the preferred first line of treatment due to a lower incidence of headache and recurrent fissure. Notwithstanding some review limitations, these conclusions appear reasonable and the call for a further trial seems appropriate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Evidence for the Reaffirmation of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation on Screening for High Blood Pressure [Internet]

High blood pressure is common, and screening is a well-established evidence-based standard of current medical practice.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 2007
Show search results within this document

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
Show search results within this document

Stable Angina: Methods, Evidence & Guidance [Internet]

Angina is pain or constricting discomfort that typically occurs in the front of the chest (but may radiate to the neck, shoulders, jaw or arms) and is brought on by physical exertion or emotional stress. It is the main symptomatic manifestation of myocardial ischaemia and is usually caused by obstructive coronary artery disease restricting oxygen delivery to the cardiac myocytes. Other factors may exacerbate angina either by further restricting oxygen delivery (for example severe anaemia) or by increasing oxygen demand (for example left ventricular hypertrophy). Angina symptoms are associated with other cardiac disease such as aortic stenosis but the management of angina associated with non-coronary artery disease is outside the scope of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guidelines Centre (UK).

Version: July 2011
Show search results within this document

Hypertension in Pregnancy: The Management of Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2010
Show search results within this document

Utility of Monitoring Mycophenolic Acid in Solid Organ Transplant Patients

To investigate whether monitoring concentrations of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in the serum or plasma of persons who receive a solid organ transplant will result in a lower incidence of transplant rejections and adverse events versus no monitoring of MPA. To investigate whether the incidence of rejection or adverse events differs according to MPA dose or frequency, type of MPA, the form of MPA monitored, the method of MPA monitoring, or sample characteristics. To assess whether monitoring is cost-effective versus no monitoring.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2008
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Agents for Overactive Bladder: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Overactive bladder is defined by the International Continence Society as a syndrome of urinary frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence, appearing in the absence of local pathological factors. Treatment of overactive bladder syndrome first requires a clear diagnosis. In patients with incontinence, multiple forms can be present and it is important to determine which form is dominant. Non-pharmacologic, non-surgical treatment consists of behavioral training (prompted voiding, bladder training, pelvic muscle rehabilitation), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, catheterization, and use of absorbent pads. Pharmacologic treatment for overactive bladder syndrome includes darifenacin, flavoxate hydrochloride, hyoscyamine, oxybutynin chloride, tolterodine tartrate, trospium chloride, scopolamine transdermal, and solifenacin succinate. The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the benefits and harms of drugs used to treat overactive bladder syndrome.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: March 2009
Show search results within this document

Calcium channel blockers for neuroleptic‐induced tardive dyskinesia

Antipsychotic medication is associated with adverse effects, including tardive dyskinesia which is characterised by abnormal, repetitive, involuntary facial movements. Calcium channel blockers, originally developed for use in cardiovascular disorders, have been experimentally used as a treatment for tardive dyskinesia. There is currently no good quality evidence to support their use.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Non surgical therapy for anal fissure.

Anal fissure is a painful ulcer usually occurring in the posterior midline of the skin just outside the entry to the rectum. Its persistence is due to spasm of the internal sphincter muscle. The typical pain of this condition is pain on moving one's bowels that persists for some time afterward. Relief with healing of chronic fissures until very recently has been achieved by surgical procedures aimed at ablation of the sphincter spasm. Because of the risk of incontinence resulting from surgery, medical alternatives for surgery have been sought. Among the older medications, bran is effective in preventing recurrence of acute fissure. Local application of muscle relaxing therapy is effective in healing chronic anal fissure, though not as well as surgery, and with considerable risk of adverse events during therapy. There is a Cochrane review related to this review dealing only with surgical procedures.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Atrial Fibrillation: The Management of Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very common problem. In England alone, approximately 835,000 people have AF.321 Through its effects on rate and rhythm, it is a major cause of morbidity. Through increasing susceptibility to stroke, it is a major cause of both morbidity and mortality.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: June 2014
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2009
Show search results within this document

Hypertension: The Clinical Management of Primary Hypertension in Adults: Update of Clinical Guidelines 18 and 34 [Internet]

NICE first issued guidance for the management of hypertension in primary care in 2004. This was followed by a rapid update of the pharmacological treatment chapter of the guideline in 2006. The current partial update of the hypertension guideline is in response to the regular five year review cycle of existing NICE guidance. It began with a scoping exercise which identified key areas of the existing guideline for which new evidence had emerged that was likely to influence or change existing guideline recommendations.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2011
Show search results within this document

Depression in Adults with a Chronic Physical Health Problem: Treatment and Management

This clinical guideline was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. It sets out clear, evidenceand consensus-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to treat and manage depression in adults with a chronic physical health problem.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Long-Acting Opioid Analgesics: Final Update 6 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of long-acting opioids and of long-acting opioids compared with short-acting opioids in adults with chronic noncancer pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2011
Show search results within this document

Bipolar Disorder: The Management of Bipolar Disorder in Adults, Children and Adolescents, in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on the treatment and management of bipolar disorder. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, patients and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guidelines will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning high quality care for those with bipolar disorder while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for patients and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2006
Show search results within this document

MI - Secondary Prevention: Secondary Prevention in Primary and Secondary Care for Patients Following a Myocardial Infarction: Partial Update of NICE CG48 [Internet]

Myocardial infarction (MI) remains one of the most dramatic presentations of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complete occlusion of the artery often produces myocardial necrosis and the classical picture of a heart attack with severe chest pain, electrocardiographic (ECG) changes of ST-segment elevation, and an elevated concentration of myocardial specific proteins in the circulation. Such people are described as having a ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Intermittent or partial occlusion produces similar, but often less severe clinical features, although no or transient and undetected ST elevation. Such cases are described as a non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). People who have suffered from either of these conditions are amenable to treatment to reduce the risk of further MI or other manifestations of vascular disease, secondary prevention.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2013
Show search results within this document

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Screening, Management, and Treatment [Internet]

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and progressive disease associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance that, if unrelieved, progresses to right ventricular pressure overload, dysfunction, right heart failure, and premature death. PAH is more prevalent in some populations, thereby warranting screening of asymptomatic individuals. This review seeks to evaluate the comparative validity, reliability, and feasibility of echocardiography and biomarker testing for the screening, diagnosis, and management of PAH; to clarify whether the use of echocardiography or biomarkers affects decisionmaking and clinical outcomes; and to determine which medications are effective for treating PAH and whether combination therapy is more effective than monotherapy.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2013
Show search results within this document

Optimal strategies for identifying kidney disease in diabetes: properties of screening tests, progression of renal dysfunction and impact of treatment – systematic review and modelling of progression and cost-effectiveness

This study found evidence to support the use of annual screening to identify the development of early kidney disease in patients with diabetes, which is consistent with current UK guidelines. For type 1 diabetes, the costs of annual screening are well within the accepted level of cost-effectiveness, and, for patients with type 2 diabetes, annual screening is even more cost-effective.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: February 2014
Show search results within this document

Headaches: Diagnosis and Management of Headaches in Young People and Adults [Internet]

Many non-specialist healthcare professionals can find the diagnosis of headache difficult, and both people with headache and their healthcare professionals can be concerned about possible serious underlying causes. This leads to variability in care and may mean that people with headaches are not always offered the most appropriate treatments. People with headache alone are unlikely to have a serious underlying disease. Comparisons between people with headache referred to secondary care and those treated in primary care show that they do not differ in terms of headache impact or disability.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: September 2012
Show search results within this document

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (91)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (1)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...