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Oxaliplatin plus vinorelbine in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Deng Y, Hu HL, Pan HX, Ren G, Yang L, Zhu XQ, Liu H.  Oxaliplatin plus vinorelbine in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2010; 10(5): 609-617

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Vinorelbine plus oxaliplatin versus vinorelbine plus cisplatin for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cisplatin (DDP) plus vinorelbine (NVB) constitute the first-line regimen (NP regimen) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Oxaliplatin (OXA) is another effective drug in treatment of NSCLC with mild toxicities to gastrointestinal tract, kidney and bone marrow. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency and safety between NVB plus OXA (NO) regimen and NP regimen for advanced NSCLC.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

A meta-analysis of platinum plus docetaxel or vinorelbine in the first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Platinum plus a third-generation agent doublet chemotherapy is the standard regimen and first-line chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of docetaxel plus platinum (DP) compared with vinorelbine plus platinum (VP) regimens in patients with advanced NSCLC.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Comparison between cisplatin plus vinorelbine and cisplatin plus docetaxel in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Whether cisplatin plus vinorelbine (VC) or cisplatin plus docetaxel (DC) are equally effective in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the VC and DC regimens in the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. A search was conducted through PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM). The language of the publication was not considered to be a limitation. The recruited trials were evaluated for eligibility and quality and the data were extracted and analyzed. The endpoints were overall response, survival rate and toxicity. We analyzed 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including a total of 1,886 patients. Patients receiving DC therapy exhibited a significantly higher response rate [relative risk (RR)=0.83, 95% CI: 0.73-0.95 and P=0.007] and 2-year survival rate (RR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.50-0.84 and P=0.001). However, the 1-year survival rate for the two cisplatin-based regimens were comparable (RR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.81-1.01 and P=0.07). Patients receiving the VC regimen more frequently developed grade 3/4 leucopenia, anemia and vomiting, whereas those receiving DC chemotherapy were more prone to grade 3/4 diarrhea. The incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and nausea were similar between the two arms. In conclusion, our study indicated that DC is superior to the VC regimen in terms of tumor response rate, 2-year survival rate and safety for the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

A meta-analysis of platinum plus gemcitabine or vinorelbine in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

This review compared gemcitabine plus platinum with vinorelbine plus platinum regimens in first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer and concluded that they appeared to be similarly efficacious; choice of which to use depended on patient tolerance to certain toxicities. Due to the limited information on toxicity comparisons, it is difficult to establish the reliability of these conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Vinorelbine-related cardiac events: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

This review compared the risk of cardiac adverse reactions with vinorelbine in comparison with other chemotherapeutic agents. The authors concluded that approximately 1% of patients in clinical trials experience vinorelbine-related cardiac events, which is similar to other agents. The conclusion follows from the evidence, though restricting the review to randomised controlled trials means that relevant data might have been missed.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Thymosin plus cisplatin with vinorelbine or gemcitabine for non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The review concluded that thymosin plus chemotherapy, when compared with chemotherapy alone, can improve overall response rate, tumour control rate quality of life and immune system function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The reliability of the authors' conclusions is uncertain as they did not incorporate the considerable uncertainty relating to the quality of the included trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Advanced Breast Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment

Breast cancer is the most common cancer for women in England and Wales, with about 37,000 new cases diagnosed and 11,000 deaths recorded in England and Wales each year. In men breast cancer is rare, with about 270 cases diagnosed, and 70 deaths in England and Wales each year. Of these new cases in women and men, around 10% are diagnosed in the advanced stages, when the tumour has spread significantly within the breast or to other organs of the body. In addition, there is a significant number of women who have been previously treated with curative intent who subsequently develop either a local recurrence or metastases. Over recent years there have been important developments in the investigation and management of these patients including new chemotherapy, and biological and hormonal agents. There is some evidence of practice variation across the country and of patchy availability of certain treatments and procedures. A clinical guideline will help to address these issues and offer guidance on best practice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: February 2009
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The delivery of chemotherapy at home: an evidence synthesis

The study found that trials comparing different settings for delivering intravenous chemotherapy appear difficult to conduct. Consequently, few conclusions can be reached regarding the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the home, community and outpatient settings. Future studies could produce more informative data if careful consideration is given to study design.

Health Services and Delivery Research - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: April 2015
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Imaging Techniques for Treatment Evaluation for Metastatic Breast Cancer [Internet]

Although multiple imaging modalities to evaluate treatment response in patients with metastatic breast cancer are used clinically, their comparative effectiveness has not been determined.

Technical Briefs - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2014
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Drug Class Review: Newer Antiemetics: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Nausea and vomiting are major concerns for patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery with general anesthesia. Risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting include emetogenicity of the chemotherapy regimen, dose, speed of intravenous infusion, female gender, age under 50 years, history of ethanol consumption, and history of prior chemotherapy. Factors predictive of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting include site of irradiation (in particular, total body irradiation and radiation fields that include the abdomen), total field size, dose per fraction, age, and predisposition for emesis (history of sickness during pregnancy or motion sickness). Female gender, a history of motion sickness or prior postoperative nausea and vomiting, nonsmoking status, and use of postoperative opioids have been suggested as factors predictive of postoperative nausea and vomiting. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of newer antiemetic drugs including the 5-HT3 and NK-1 antagonists.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: January 2009
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Eribulin -- Benefit Assessment According to §35a Social Code Book V [Internet]

The benefit assessment of eribulin was carried out in accordance with the approved therapeutic indication of “Treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have progressed after at least two chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced disease. Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline and a taxane, unless patients were not suitable for these treatments”.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 30, 2012

Systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of capecitabine (Xeloda®) for locally advanced and/or metastatic breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the UK, accounting for nearly 30% of all cancers in women. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women; in 1998 there were over 13,000 deaths from breast cancer in the UK. Around 50% of women diagnosed with primary breast cancer will eventually relapse and develop metastatic or advanced disease. In addition, around 10% of patients present with metastatic disease at first diagnosis. Metastatic breast cancer is currently considered incurable and most women will die of the disease. Prognosis of patients with metastatic disease depends on age, extent of disease and oestrogen receptor status. First-line chemotherapy regimens available for advanced or metastatic breast cancer include CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil) and anthracycline-containing regimens. Almost all patients who have received first-line chemotherapy for their metastatic progression will relapse or progress and require subsequent treatment. For these patients requiring second- and subsequent-line therapy, the goals of treatment are to maintain a good quality of life (QoL) and to prolong survival. Current guidance from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends the taxanes (paclitaxel and docetaxel) "as an option for the treatment of advanced breast cancer where initial cytotoxic chemotherapy has failed or is inappropriate". In addition, vinorelbine, a third-generation vinca alkaloid, has demonstrated some activity in advanced breast cancer in patients with anthracycline-resistant or -refractory disease. Capecitabine has recently been licensed for use as monotherapy for patients who have failed anthracycline-containing and taxane chemotherapy and in combination with docetaxel for patients who have failed anthracycline-containing chemotherapy.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2004

Pemetrexed disodium for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a systematic review and economic evaluation

The review aimed to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pemetrexed disodium in combination with cisplatin for the treatment of unresectable pleural mesothelioma in chemotherapy-naïve patients.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2007

Treatment of Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review of Comparative Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness [Internet]

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States, and male Veterans seeking care at VA hospitals have a much higher age-specific incidence of lung cancer than males in the general population. The personal and economic significance of lung cancer has led to a vast research endeavor to try and identify new and more effective treatments. Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when the cancer is already advanced (stage IIIB or IV), and they are no longer candidates for surgical resection. Small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are different diseases in terms of treatment. Until recently, all therapies for advanced NSCLC were based on their cytotoxic properties. In the last few years, several novel agents aimed at specific molecular targets have been developed. This review was requested to evaluate the current evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of treatments for advanced lung cancer.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: October 2012
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The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lung Cancer (Update)

This guidance updates and replaces NICE clinical guideline 24 (published February 2005).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: April 2011
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The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of gemcitabine for metastatic breast cancer: a systematic review and economic evaluation

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, accounting for one-third of all cancers in women. In 2003, the age-standardised incidence rates per 100,000 population were 120.3 for England and 120.83 for Wales. The high incidence of breast cancer in conjunction with relatively good survival rates, compared with many other cancers, has led to a relatively high prevalence. Increasing age is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer, and the disease is rare in women under the age of 40 years. Over 80% of cases occur in women over the age of 50 years, with the number of diagnoses reaching a peak in the 55-59-year age group.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2007

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 31, 2017

Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: June 16, 2017

Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of cervical cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 31, 2017

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