Home > Search Results

Results: 21 to 40 of 51

Catheter Ablation for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation [Internet]

This report evaluates the current state of evidence regarding effectiveness and harms of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) with a focus on longer-term outcomes and evidence relevant to the Medicare population.

Technology Assessment Report - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 20, 2015
Show search results within this document

Antisocial Behaviour and Conduct Disorders in Children and Young People: Recognition, Intervention and Management

Antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders are the most common reason for referral to child and adolescent mental health services and have a significant impact on the quality of life of children and young people and their parents and carers. Rates of other mental health problems (including antisocial personality disorder) are considerably increased for adults who had a conduct disorder in childhood. This new NICE guideline seeks to address these problems by offering advice on prevention strategies, as well as a range of psychosocial interventions.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2013
Show search results within this document

MI - Secondary Prevention: Secondary Prevention in Primary and Secondary Care for Patients Following a Myocardial Infarction: Partial Update of NICE CG48 [Internet]

Myocardial infarction (MI) remains one of the most dramatic presentations of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complete occlusion of the artery often produces myocardial necrosis and the classical picture of a heart attack with severe chest pain, electrocardiographic (ECG) changes of ST-segment elevation, and an elevated concentration of myocardial specific proteins in the circulation. Such people are described as having a ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Intermittent or partial occlusion produces similar, but often less severe clinical features, although no or transient and undetected ST elevation. Such cases are described as a non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). People who have suffered from either of these conditions are amenable to treatment to reduce the risk of further MI or other manifestations of vascular disease, secondary prevention.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2013
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2009
Show search results within this document

Hypertension: The Clinical Management of Primary Hypertension in Adults: Update of Clinical Guidelines 18 and 34 [Internet]

NICE first issued guidance for the management of hypertension in primary care in 2004. This was followed by a rapid update of the pharmacological treatment chapter of the guideline in 2006. The current partial update of the hypertension guideline is in response to the regular five year review cycle of existing NICE guidance. It began with a scoping exercise which identified key areas of the existing guideline for which new evidence had emerged that was likely to influence or change existing guideline recommendations.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2011
Show search results within this document

Generalised Anxiety Disorder in Adults: Management in Primary, Secondary and Community Care

This clinical guideline is an update of NICE’s previous guidance on generalised anxiety disorder. It was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, and sets out clear evidence- and consensus-based recommendations for healthcare professionals on how to treat and manage generalised anxiety disorder in adults.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2011
Show search results within this document

Multiple Sclerosis: Management of Multiple Sclerosis in Primary and Secondary Care

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an acquired chronic immune-mediated inflammatory condition of the central nervous system (CNS), affecting both the brain and spinal cord. It affects approximately 100,000 people in the UK. It is the commonest cause of serious physical disability in adults of working age.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 2014
Show search results within this document

Multimorbidity: Assessment, Prioritisation and Management of Care for People with Commonly Occurring Multimorbidity

Multimorbidity is usually defined as when an individual has two or more long-term conditions. Measuring the prevalence of multimorbidity is not straightforward since this will vary depending on which conditions are counted, but all recent studies show that multimorbidity is common, becomes more common as people age, and is more common in people from less affluent areas. A recent large UK based study found that 42% of the population had at least one of the 40 conditions counted, and 23% had multimorbidity. Two-thirds of people aged 65 years or over had multimorbidity, and 47% had three or more conditions. People living in the most deprived areas had double the rate of multimorbidity in middle age than those living in the most affluent areas. Put another way, they developed multimorbidity 10-15 years before their more affluent peers. The recognition of multimorbidity associated with socioeconomic depreivation is particularly important as NHS England has a legal duty to have regard to the need to reduce health inequalities. Whereas rates of multimorbidity in older people was largely due to higher rates of physical conditions, in the less affluent multimorbidity was due to combinations of physical and mental health conditions was common.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: September 2016
Show search results within this document

Depression in Adults with a Chronic Physical Health Problem: Treatment and Management

This clinical guideline was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. It sets out clear, evidenceand consensus-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to treat and manage depression in adults with a chronic physical health problem.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Antidysrhythmic drug therapy for the termination of stable, monomorphic ventricular tachycardia: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: We performed a systematic review of the literature to compare the efficacy of different drug therapies for the termination of stable, monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Oral antiarrhythmic drugs in converting recent onset atrial fibrillation

AIM: This article reviews clinical studies on oral antiarrhythmic drugs in converting recent onset atrial fibrillation. An oral loading dose of an antiarrhythmic drug for cardioversion of atrial fibrillation could be an option, due to its simplicity, both for patients admitted to outpatient departments and for episodic treatment by self administration outside the hospital. The latter treatment strategy has recently been pointed out by the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology as the 'pill in the pocket approach'.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Anti-arrhythmia drugs for cardiac arrest: a systemic review and meta-analysis

INTRODUCTION: Antiarrhythmia agents have been used in the treatment of cardiac arrest, and we aimed to review the relevant clinical controlled trials to assess the effects of antiarrhythmics during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Implantable cardioverter defibrillators in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy: patient outcomes, incidence of appropriate and inappropriate interventions, and complications

BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is a cardiomyopathy characterized by ventricular arrhythmias and an abnormal right ventricle. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy may prevent sudden cardiac death in patients with ARVD/C. Currently, an overview of outcomes, appropriate and inappropriate interventions, and complications of ICD therapy in ARVD/C is lacking.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Interventions for the treatment of atrial fibrillation: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: To perform a systematic review/meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Systematic review and cost-effectiveness evaluation of 'pill-in-the-pocket' strategy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation compared to episodic in-hospital treatment or continuous antiarrhythmic drug therapy

This review found no studies that assessed the effectiveness of pill-in-the-pocket. Studies that included relevant drugs for treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation found that flecainide and propafenone had similar effectiveness relating to conversion to normal sinus rhythm up to eight hours. These conclusions should be interpreted cautiously, given the possibility of missing relevant studies and concerns over review methods.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Adjunctive antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a systematic review

This review assessed the use of adjunctive anti-arrhythmic drug therapy to reduce the risk of implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock therapies. The authors concluded that only amiodarone appears effective but it cannot be routinely recommended because of potential safety concerns. The review was generally well-conducted, but limited evidence and differences between the studies suggest a more cautious conclusion may be appropriate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy of cardioversion by vernakalant and comparators in patients with atrial fibrillation

This review concluded that results suggested vernakalant intravenous, propafenone intravenous and flecainide appeared to be effective in achieving rapid cardioversion in patients with short duration atrial fibrillation compared to other agents. Given the limitations of the review, and limited data available for some of the the interventions, the reliability of the conclusions is uncertain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Rate-control vs. rhythm-control in patients with atrial fibrillation: a meta-analysis

This review looked at two strategies for treating atrial fibrillation: rate control by means of drugs compared with rhythm control by cardioversion followed by prophylactic drugs. The authors found that rate control was associated with a lower risk of death or thromboembolic stroke. Although information on some aspects of the review process was missing, the conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Rhythm vs rate control of atrial fibrillation meta-analysed by number needed to treat

This review looked at rate control versus rhythm control for atrial fibrillation. The authors found that rate control was associated with a lower incidence of hospitalisation, but there were little other differences in outcomes. They concluded that rate control was preferable. There were a number of problems with the review and the conclusion may not, therefore, be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Curative ablation for atrial fibrillation: a systematic review

This systematic review concluded that catheter ablation was more effective than drug therapy for atrial fibrillation, but that data on adverse effects was sparse. The review appeared to have been reasonably well conducted, although poor reporting limited the assessment of some sources of bias. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence presented, but the low quality of the included studies limited the reliability of the conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (68)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...