Home > Search Results

Results: 21 to 40 of 91

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Adults in Primary and Secondary Care [Internet]

This guideline offers best practice advice on the identification and care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It aims to define the symptoms, signs and investigations required to establish a diagnosis of COPD. It also aims to define the factors that are necessary to assess its severity, provide prognostic information and guide best management. It gives guidance on the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of patients with stable COPD, and on the management of exacerbations. The interface with surgery and intensive therapy units (ITU) are also discussed.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: June 2010
Show search results within this document

Long‐acting beta2‐agonists for chronic asthma in adults and children where background therapy contains varied or no inhaled corticosteroid

Note added in July 2014: Since the original version of this review, guidance around LABA has changed. International asthma guidelines now only recommend the use of LABA in conjunction with ICS. The US Food and Drug Agency (FDA) has issued a warning that LABA should not be used to treat asthma without concurrent ICS. The review will continue to be available for people to read on the Cochrane Library, but we will not update the review again. It is no longer considered safe to take LABA on their own without taking inhaled steroids due to harms which can occur.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Drug Class Review: Quick-relief Medications for Asthma: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. In susceptible individuals this inflammation causes recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, cough, and other symptoms. Asthma medications fall into 2 general classes: medications for long-term control and medications for quick relief of airflow obstruction and symptoms. Medications for quick relief of bronchoconstriction and acute symptoms include short-acting beta2-agonists and anticholinergics. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of short-acting beta2-agonists and ipratropium bromide used for quick relief of asthma symptoms.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
Show search results within this document

Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction and Asthma

The objectives are: (1) to assess diagnostic test characteristics of six alternative index tests compared with the selected reference standard-a standardized exercise challenge test (ECT) in patients with suspected exercise-induced bronchoconstriction or asthma (EIB/EIA); (2) to determine the efficacy of a single prophylactic dose of four pharmacologic and one nonpharmacologic interventions versus placebo to attenuate EIB/EIA in patients with diagnosed EIB/EIA; and (3) to determine if regular daily treatment with short-acting or long-acting beta-agonists (SABA or LABA) causes patients with EIA to develop tachyphylaxis when additional prophylactic doses are used pre-exercise.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 2010
Show search results within this document

Systematic review and economic analysis of the comparative effectiveness of different inhaled corticosteroids and their usage with long-acting beta2 agonists for the treatment of chronic asthma in children under the age of 12 years

Various strategies are used in the prevention and management of asthma. Pharmacological management includes, among other drugs, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and short- and long-acting beta2 agonists (SABAs/LABAs). Both ICS and LABAs are inhaled controller medications that need to be taken on a long-term daily basis for maximum symptom control. The medications can be delivered via a number of different types of inhaler devices; these differ in the efficiency with which they deliver the drug to the lower respiratory tract.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2008

Tiotropium bromide for COPD: Executive summary of final report A05-18, Version 1.0

The aims of this report were ■ to assess the benefit of tiotropium bromide compared to placebo or other pharmacological treatment options, alone or in combination, and ■ the comparative benefit assessment of the two forms of application of tiotropium bromide, namely the HandiHaler and the Respimat, in each case for the long-term inhalation treatment of patients with COPD with respect to patient-relevant outcomes.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 26, 2012

Systematic review and economic analysis of the comparative effectiveness of different inhaled corticosteroids and their usage with long-acting beta2 agonists for the treatment of chronic asthma in adults and children aged 12 years and over

Various strategies are used in the prevention and management of asthma. Pharmacological management includes, among other drugs, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and short- and long-acting beta2 agonists (SABAs/LABAs). Both ICS and LABAs are inhaled controller medications that need to be taken on a long-term daily basis for maximum symptom control. Medication delivery can be via a number of different types of inhaler device; these differ in the efficiency with which they deliver the drug to the lower respiratory tract.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2008

Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Evidence Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force [Internet]

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the United States.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2016
Show search results within this document

Lithium or an atypical antipsychotic drug in the management of treatment-resistant depression: a systematic review and economic evaluation

Report finds that treatment strategy involving augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with lithium or an atypical antipsychotic drug (AAP) is likely to be beneficial in people with treatment-resistant depression.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: November 2013
Show search results within this document

Systematic review and economic analysis of the comparative effectiveness of different inhaled corticosteroids and their usage with long-acting beta2 agonists for the treatment of chronic asthma in children under the age of 12 years

OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) alone and ICS used in combination with a long-acting beta2 agonist (LABA) in the treatment of chronic asthma in children aged under 12 years.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Systematic review and economic analysis of the comparative effectiveness of different inhaled corticosteroids and their usage with long-acting beta2 agonists for the treatment of chronic asthma in adults and children aged 12 years and over

OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) alone and ICS used in combination with a long-acting beta2 agonist (LABA) in the treatment of chronic asthma in adults and children aged over 12 years.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Indacaterol / Glycopyrronium -- Benefit Assessment According to §35a Social Code Book V [Internet]

The aim of this report is to assess the added benefit of indacaterol / glycopyrronium in comparison with the appropriate comparator therapy (ACT) in adult patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for maintenance bronchodilator treatment to relieve symptoms.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: February 12, 2014

Fixed combinations of corticosteroids and long-acting beta-2-receptor agonists for inhaled use in patients with asthma: Executive summary of final report A05-13, Version 1.0

The aims of the present investigation were: the evaluation of the benefits and harms of formoterol/budesonide administered by a fixed combination inhaler compared with formoterol and budesonide administered by separate inhalers in patients with asthma. the evaluation of the benefits and harms of salmeterol/fluticasone administered by a fixed combination inhaler compared with salmeterol and fluticasone administered by separate inhalers in patients with asthma. the evaluation of the benefits and harms of formoterol/budesonide administered by a fixed combination inhaler compared with salmeterol/fluticasone administered by a fixed combination inhaler.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: March 30, 2007

Long‐acting beta2‐agonists versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma

This review compared three asthma medications, salmeterol, formoterol (both long acting beta‐agonists) and theophylline. These medications are used to help control symptoms of asthma, especially those which occur during the night. This review found that salmeterol showed a greater improvement in lung function, and reduced the need for extra short‐term inhalers in the day and the night. Salmeterol and formoterol are less likely to produce side‐effects (such as headaches and nausea) when compared to theophylline.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Which long‐acting inhaled drugs, used alone or in combination, are the most effective for people with COPD?

Inhaled drugs for COPD have been shown to relieve symptoms, improve quality of life and prevent or treat flare‐ups. Treatment with these inhaled drugs tends to begin with one inhaler, and additional therapies are introduced as necessary. For persistent or worsening symptoms, long‐acting inhaled drugs taken once or twice daily are preferred over short‐acting ones. Several Cochrane reviews have looked at the risks and benefits of specific long‐acting inhaled therapies compared with placebo or other treatments. However for patients and clinicians, it is important to understand the benefits of these treatments relative to each other, and whether a particular type of inhaled therapy is more beneficial than the others.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Fixed combinations of corticosteroids and long-acting beta-2-receptor agonists for inhaled use in patients with asthma - supplementary commission: Executive summary of final report A07-01, Version 1.0

The aims of the planned research result from the wording of the commission of the Federal Joint Committee, as well as from the new approval and extension of approval in Germany for fixed combinations of ICS and LABA in the treatment of patients with asthma.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 5, 2008

Long‐acting beta2‐agonists for poorly reversible chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

This review aims to determine the effectiveness of long‐acting beta‐agonists, salmeterol or formoterol, in the treatment of COPD (emphysema/chronic bronchitis). These drugs improve airflow in the lungs, and enable people with COPD to get on with their daily activities. Twenty‐four studies (6061 participants) reported the effects of LABAs in people with COPD. People taking salmeterol 50 mcg daily do have fewer exacerbations than those on placebo, and some improvement in lung function and certain quality of life scores. The findings were not consistent enough to support a general recommendation for the use of these drugs in the group of people with COPD with minimal variation in their lung function, although there is some evidence of improvement in important outcomes and these findings require further exploration in additional trials.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Combined inhalers versus placebo for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

We reviewed the evidence on the effects of combined inhalers in people with COPD when compared with placebo. We particularly focused on whether combined inhalers are a good but safe treatment for adults with COPD.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Combination therapy of inhaled steroids and long‐acting beta2‐agonists compared to inhaled steroids alone for people with COPD

Combinations of two classes of medication (long‐acting beta2‐agonists (LABAs) and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) in one inhaler have been developed to treat people with COPD, as this may make it easier to take the medication. Three brands of combined inhaler are currently available: budesonide/formoterol (BDF-'Symbicort'), fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FPS-'Advair' or 'Seretide') and mometasone furoate/formoterol (MF/F-'Dulera'). Both the ICS part and the LABA component of each inhaler are aimed at reducing flare‐ups of COPD, which can be debilitating and costly. In addition, the LABA component may improve day‐to‐day symptoms such as breathlessness and exercise tolerance.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Aclidinium Bromide -- Benefit Assessment According to §35a Social Code Book V [Internet]

The aim of this report is to assess the added benefit of aclidinium bromide (hereinafter abbreviated to “aclidinium”) according to the approval status for the following therapeutic indication: maintenance bronchodilator treatment to relieve symptoms in adult patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: December 21, 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (159)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (2)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...