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Drugs that prevent oral bleeding in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions

We reviewed the evidence about whether antifibrinolytic medicine (drugs that promote blood clotting) such as tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid, can prevent oral bleeding in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Recombinant (non‐human) factor VIIa clotting factor concentrates versus plasma concentrates for acute bleeds in people with haemophilia and inhibitors

We wanted to find evidence on the effectiveness of recombinant factor VIIa (containing no human proteins) as compared to concentrates derived from plasma for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with haemophilia with inhibitors.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Comparative Effectiveness of In-Hospital Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa for Off-Label Indications vs. Usual Care [Internet]

This report evaluates the level of evidence currently available to support the effectiveness and safety of using recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa) for clinical indications not approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). rFVIIa is approved for a variety of uses in hemophilia patients who have developed antibody inhibitors that compromise the use of standard factor replacement. Use of this costly biologic product has expanded beyond these hemophilia-related indications to encompass a range of off-label uses, most of which are in-hospital uses. These uses differ substantially from the drug’s FDA approved label. The purpose of this report is two-fold: (1) To document the full range of clinical indications for which rFVIIa is being used and the types of studies available to evaluate these uses and (2) To provide a comparative effectiveness review of rFVIIa vs. usual care for several in-hospital clinical indications: intracranial hemorrhage, massive bleeding secondary to trauma, and the selected surgical procedures of cardiac surgery, liver transplantation, and prostatectomy.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2010
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Blood Transfusion

This guideline contains recommendations about general principles of blood transfusion, and applies to a range of conditions and different settings. It does not include recommendations relating to specific conditions and provides guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2015

Anticoagulation Monitoring and Reversal Strategies for Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Apixaban: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to review the clinical effectiveness and cost of strategies to identify over-anticoagulation states and strategies to treat bleeding associated with the use of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, with the broader aim to help inform future listing recommendations and decisions, as well as clinical practice.

CADTH Therapeutic Review - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: April 2012
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Fractures (Non-Complex): Assessment and Management

Two of the five guidelines in the NICE trauma suite relate to fractures. These are titled non-complex and complex fractures. In broad terms, non-complex fractures are those likely to be treated at the receiving hospital, whereas complex fractures require transfer or the consideration of transfer of the injured person to a specialist.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: February 2016
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Fractures (Complex): Assessment and Management

Two of the five guidelines in the NICE Trauma Suite relate to fractures. These are titled non-complex and complex fractures. In broad terms the non-complex fractures are those likely to be treated at the receiving hospital, whereas the complex fractures require transfer or the consideration of transfer of the injured person to a specialist centre.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: February 2016
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Human Growth Hormone Treatment for Prader-Willi Syndrome in Adolescent and Adult Patients: Clinical Evidence, Safety, and Guidelines [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to review the clinical effectiveness of human growth hormone (GH) treatment for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) in adolescent and adult patients and the evidence based guidelines for the use of GH for treating adolescents and adults with PWS. This report is an update of a previous CADTH Rapid Response Report which included one meta-analysis, two RCTs and 10 non-randomized studies and reported that GH therapy in patients with PWS, had multiple beneficial effects on body composition and growth and a few negative effects.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: November 6, 2015

Gene therapy for haemophilia

We reviewed the evidence about the safety and effectiveness of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or haemophilia B.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery [Internet]

This is an evidence report prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) examining the comparative efficacy and safety of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in major orthopedic surgery (total hip replacement [THR], total knee replacement [TKR], and hip fracture surgery [HFS]) and other nonmajor orthopedic surgeries (knee arthroscopy, injuries distal to the hip requiring surgery, and elective spine surgery).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2012
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Preterm Labour and Birth

This guideline reviews the evidence for the care of women who present with signs and symptoms of preterm labour and those who are scheduled to have a preterm birth. It also reviews how preterm birth can be optimally diagnosed in symptomatic women, given that many women thought to be in preterm labour when clinically assessed will not deliver preterm. Optimal diagnosis can facilitate transfer to a place where appropriate neonatal intensive care can be provided, a strategy known to improve rates of survival for the baby. Additional areas that will be covered by the guidance (such as information needs for women who presents with signs and symptoms of preterm labour) are outlined in the guideline scope.

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: November 2015
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Major Trauma: Assessment and Initial Management

This guideline provides guidance on the assessment and management of major trauma, including resuscitation following major blood loss associated with trauma. For the purposes of this guideline, major trauma is defined as an injury or a combination of injuries that are life-threatening and could be life changing because it may result in long-term disability. This guideline covers both the pre-hospital and immediate hospital care of major trauma patients but does not include any management after definitive lifesaving intervention. It has been developed for health practitioners and professionals, patients and carers and commissioners of health services.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: February 2016
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Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008

Intrapartum Care: Care of Healthy Women and Their Babies During Childbirth

The guideline is intended to cover the care of healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies entering labour at low risk of developing intrapartum complications. In addition, recommendations are included that address the care of women who start labour as ‘low risk’ but who go on to develop complications. These include the care of women with prelabour rupture of membranes at term, care of the woman and baby when meconium is present, indications for continuous cardiotocography, interpretation of cardiotocography traces, and management of retained placenta and postpartum haemorrhage. Aspects of intrapartum care for women at risk of developing intrapartum complications are covered by a range of guidelines on specific conditions (see section 1.8) and a further guideline is planned on intrapartum care of women ‘at high risk’ of complications during pregnancy and the intrapartum period.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2014

End of Life Care for Infants, Children and Young People with Life-Limiting Conditions: Planning and Management

This guideline covers the physical, emotional, social and spiritual elements of end of life care, and focuses on improving the child or young person’s quality of life and supporting their family and carers. There are, for instance, recommendations on managing distressing symptoms and providing care and bereavement support after death. Recommendations have also been made about how services should be delivered. The guideline is aimed at all providers of paediatric end of life care, whatever their level of practise, and also for children and young people with life-limiting conditions and their parents or carers.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Alliance (UK).

Version: December 2016

Registries for Evaluating Patient Outcomes: A User's Guide [Internet]. 3rd edition

This User's Guide is intended to support the design, implementation, analysis, interpretation, and quality evaluation of registries created to increase understanding of patient outcomes. For the purposes of this guide, a patient registry is an organized system that uses observational study methods to collect uniform data (clinical and other) to evaluate specified outcomes for a population defined by a particular disease, condition, or exposure, and that serves one or more predetermined scientific, clinical, or policy purposes. A registry database is a file (or files) derived from the registry. Although registries can serve many purposes, this guide focuses on registries created for one or more of the following purposes: to describe the natural history of disease, to determine clinical effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of health care products and services, to measure or monitor safety and harm, and/or to measure quality of care.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2014

Sepsis: Recognition, Assessment and Early Management

Sepsis is a clinical syndrome caused by the body's immune and coagulation systems being switched on by an infection. Sepsis with shock is a life-threatening condition that is characterised by low blood pressure despite adequate fluid replacement, and organ dysfunction or failure. Sepsis is an important cause of death in people of all ages. Both a UK Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman enquiry (2013) and UK National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD, 2015) have recently highlighted sepsis as being a leading cause of avoidable death that kills more people than breast, bowel and prostate cancer combined.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2016

Venous Thromboembolism: Reducing the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism (Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism) in Patients Admitted to Hospital

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a term used to include the formation of a blood clot (a thrombus) in a vein which may dislodge from its site of origin to travel in the blood, a phenomenon called embolism. A thrombus most commonly occurs in the deep veins of the legs; this is called deep vein thrombosis. A dislodged thrombus that travels to the lungs is known as a pulmonary embolism.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre – Acute and Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2010

Spinal Injury: Assessment and Initial Management

The scope of this guideline is the assessment, imaging and early management of spinal injury and does not address rehabilitation. It is important to recognise that early management is intrinsically connected to rehabilitation and some later complications may be avoided with changes in early care. Early and ongoing collaborative multidisciplinary care across a trauma network is vital in ensuring that the patient with a spinal injury receives the best possible care.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: February 2016
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Lower Limb Peripheral Arterial Disease: Diagnosis and Management [Internet]

Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (known in the document as peripheral arterial disease, PAD) is a marker for an increased risk of potentially preventable cardiovascular events even when it is asymptomatic. If it becomes symptomatic it can lead to significant impairment of quality of life through limiting mobility and in its more severe manifestations may lead to severe pain, ulceration and gangrene and is the largest single cause of lower limb amputation in the UK.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2012
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