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Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory itchy skin condition that develops in early childhood in the majority of cases. It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation (flares, which may occur as frequently as two or three per month) and remissions, except for severe cases where it may be continuous. Certain patterns of atopic eczema are recognised. In infants, atopic eczema usually involves the face and extensor surfaces of the limbs and, while it may involve the trunk, the napkin area is usually spared. A few infants may exhibit a discoid pattern (circular patches). In older children flexural involvement predominates, as in adults. Diagnostic criteria are discussed in Chapter 3. As with other atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), atopic eczema often has a genetic component. In atopic eczema, inherited factors affect the development of the skin barrier, which can lead to exacerbation of the disease by a large number of trigger factors, including irritants and allergens. Many cases of atopic eczema clear or improve during childhood while others persist into adulthood, and some children who have atopic eczema `will go on to develop asthma and/or allergic rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The epidemiology of atopic eczema is considered in Chapter 5, and the impact of the condition on children and their families/caregivers is considered in Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2007

There are over 400,000 people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the UK. Although this makes it a common disorder, there are numerous other conditions ahead of it in terms of numbers, and indeed as causes of excess mortality. What this does not capture however, is the dreadful morbidity associated with the disease. The synovitis of RA affects multiple sites causing widespread pain, and the subsequent destruction of the joints can lead to severe disability affecting all aspects of motor function from walking to fine movements of the hand. Furthermore, RA is not simply a disease of the joints but can affect many other organs causing, for example, widespread vasculitis or severe lung fibrosis. More recently it has become apparent that RA is associated with an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease and significant increased risk of premature mortality.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: February 2009

Surgical site infections are caused by bacteria that get in through incisions made during surgery. They threaten the lives of millions of patients each year and contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance. In low- and middle-income countries, 11% of patients who undergo surgery are infected in the process. In Africa, up to 20% of women who have a caesarean section contract a wound infection, compromising their own health and their ability to care for their babies. But surgical site infections are not just a problem for poor countries. In the United States, they contribute to patients spending more than 400 000 extra days in hospital at a cost of an additional US$ 10 billion per year.

World Health Organization.

Version: 2016

Expert-reviewed information summary about constipation, impaction, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea as complications of cancer or its treatment. The management of these problems is discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 1, 2018

NICE issued guidance on the prevention, identification, assessment and management of overweight and obesity in adults and children in 2006 (CG43). This was a joint clinical and public health guideline developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Primary Care (now merged as part of the National Clinical Guidelines Centre) and NICE’s Centre for Public Health Excellence. Despite the guidance, there remain significant variations in existing service provision for people with obesity and, in many places, the multicomponent programmes that are required for both prevention and treatment are limited. The 2013 Royal College of Physicians report ‘Action on obesity: comprehensive care for all’ reported that access to surgery for obesity in some areas of the UK did not reflect the guideline recommendations.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2014

Expert-reviewed information summary about the causes and management of nutrition problems that occur in patients with cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: November 17, 2017

Seventeen donor breast milk banks are currently in operation in the UK. These provide donor milk to babies, including pre-term babies and babies with growth restriction.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (UK).

Version: February 2010

NICE first issued guidance for the management of hypertension in primary care in 2004. This was followed by a rapid update of the pharmacological treatment chapter of the guideline in 2006. The current partial update of the hypertension guideline is in response to the regular five year review cycle of existing NICE guidance. It began with a scoping exercise which identified key areas of the existing guideline for which new evidence had emerged that was likely to influence or change existing guideline recommendations.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2011

This guideline offers best practice advice on the identification and care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It aims to define the symptoms, signs and investigations required to establish a diagnosis of COPD. It also aims to define the factors that are necessary to assess its severity, provide prognostic information and guide best management. It gives guidance on the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of patients with stable COPD, and on the management of exacerbations. The interface with surgery and intensive therapy units (ITU) are also discussed.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: June 2010

These guidelines provide guidance on the diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection and the care of people living with HIV. They are structured along the continuum of HIV testing, prevention, treatment and care.

World Health Organization.

Version: 2016

Diabetes is a long-term condition that can have a major impact on the life of a child or young person, as well as their family or carers. In addition to insulin therapy, diabetes management should include education, support and access to psychological services, as detailed here and in this guideline. Preparations should also be made for the transition from paediatric to adult services, which have a somewhat different model of care and evidence base.

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2015

Jaundice is one of the most common conditions requiring medical attention in newborn babies. Approximately 60% of term and 80% of preterm babies develop jaundice in the first week of life, and about 10% of breastfed babies are still jaundiced at 1 month of age. In most babies with jaundice thevre is no underlying disease, and this early jaundice (termed ‘physiological jaundice’) is generally harmless. However, there are pathological causes of jaundice in the newborn, which, although rare, need to be detected. Such pathological jaundice may co-exist with physiological jaundice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: May 2010

Psoriasis is a common, chronic disease, which for many people, is associated with profound functional, psychological and social morbidity and important comorbidities. Effective treatments are available. Some treatments are expensive; all require appropriate monitoring and some may only be accessed in specialist care settings. Evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of people with psoriasis are currently dissatisfied with their treatment.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 2012

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008

Study found that for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs had cost per quality-adjusted life-year values greater than the thresholds stated by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and could not be considered cost-effective.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: April 2016

This guideline reviews the evidence for the care of women who present with signs and symptoms of preterm labour and those who are scheduled to have a preterm birth. It also reviews how preterm birth can be optimally diagnosed in symptomatic women, given that many women thought to be in preterm labour when clinically assessed will not deliver preterm. Optimal diagnosis can facilitate transfer to a place where appropriate neonatal intensive care can be provided, a strategy known to improve rates of survival for the baby. Additional areas that will be covered by the guidance (such as information needs for women who presents with signs and symptoms of preterm labour) are outlined in the guideline scope.

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: November 2015

The purpose of this project was to provide national guidance on the optimal use of 99mTc during a situation of reduced supply. To accomplish this, our objective at CADTH was:

Optimal Use Report - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: 2012

Infections that occur in the wound created by an invasive surgical procedure are generally referred to as surgical site infections (SSIs). SSIs are one of the most important causes of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). A prevalence survey undertaken in 2006 suggested that approximately 8% of patients in hospital in the UK have an HCAI. SSIs accounted for 14% of these infections and nearly 5% of patients who had undergone a surgical procedure were found to have developed an SSI. However, prevalence studies tend to underestimate SSI because many of these infections occur after the patient has been discharged from hospital.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: October 2008

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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