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Acute pain is often felt soon after injury. Most people who have surgery have moderate or severe pain afterwards. People with pain are used to test pain killers. They have often had wisdom teeth removed. The pain is often treated with pain killers given by mouth. Results can then be applied to other forms of acute pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 22, 2013

We aimed to assess the benefits (improvement in pain, stiffness, physical function) and harms (gut and heart problems) of celecoxib compared with other similar drugs or a fake drug (placebo) for adults with rheumatoid arthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: June 9, 2017

We evaluated benefits and harms of celecoxib, a drug used to treat people with osteoarthritis, to improve pain, movement, quality of life and drug safety.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: May 22, 2017

The objectives were to review the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2008

Bibliographic details: Meng M, Liu LC, Ge B, Tang H, Wu YQ, Xu Y.  Efficacy of celecoxib and naproxen for treating osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2011; 11(5): 560-564 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=201105017

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) to cause regression and prevent the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to cervical cancer. We found only two small studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 9, 2014

Neuropathic pain is pain which comes from damaged nerves, spinal cord, or brain. It is different from pain messages that are carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (for example, a fall or cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines to those used for pain from damaged tissue. Medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 5, 2015

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND) and Lou Gehrig's disease, is a rare disease in which degeneration of motor nerves leads to progressive weakness and wasting of muscles. For the most part, the cause of ALS is unknown. In a small proportion of cases there is a family history of ALS/MND and in an even smaller proportion, the disease is known to result from a change in one of several genes including SOD1, TDP‐43 and FUS. An understanding of the genetic basis for one familial form of ALS/MND has permitted the construction of an animal model of ALS/MND (the SOD1 mouse) that has been used extensively to study potential therapeutic agents for the human disease. None of the drugs found to be effective in the mouse have translated into therapeutic benefits for humans with ALS/MND. There are several possible explanations for this finding, one of which is that people with familial and sporadic ALS may respond differently to the same treatment and that the SOD1 mouse may be a better model of familial ALS (or at least familial ALS due to mutations in the SOD1 gene) than it is of sporadic ALS. In an effort to begin to address this question, this review was undertaken in order to ask whether or not people with the familial form of the disease respond differently to treatment compared to people with the sporadic (or non‐familial) form of ALS/MND.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: January 21, 2009

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have reported that inflammation is closely associated with depression, and adjunctive non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment has been suggested as a novel therapeutic approach for depression.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to reduce inflammatory pain and swelling in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with rheumatological manifestations (e.g. arthritis). While these drugs effectively reduce musculoskeletal pain and stiffness, long‐term use is limited by gastrointestinal (GI) side effects and disease exacerbation (i.e. an increase in the severity of a disease or its signs and symptoms). As an alternative to NSAIDs, selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX‐2) inhibitors were developed to improve tolerability (i.e. the degree to which the side effects of a drug can be tolerated by a patient). COX‐2 inhibitors include drugs such as celecoxib, rofecoxib, valdecoxib, etoricoxib, and lumiracoxib. Rofecoxib and valdecoxib have been withdrawn from the market worldwide due to safety concerns (most importantly an increased risk of heart attack or stroke) and lumiracoxib has been withdrawn in many countries due to liver toxicity. However, celecoxib and etoricoxib are available for use in many countries. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the tolerability and safety of COX‐2 inhibitors used for the treatment of rheumatological manifestations of IBD. Safety refers to whether the drug causes any harm and is typically assessed by the number and type of side effects caused by the drug.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 23, 2014

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this research was to perform a systematic review to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy and safety of add-on celecoxib for treatment of depressive mood episodes.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

PURPOSE: Evidence on the benefits of combining celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in treating advanced cancer is still controversial. This study aimed to establish the efficacy and safety profile of celecoxib in treating advanced cancers.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

AIM: The present meta-analysis attempted to assess whether an unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile could be identified in the case of two COX2 selective inhibitors (COXIBs), namely celecoxib and etoricoxib. Based on the data from the literature, our meta-analysis aimed to assess the probability of major cardiovascular events reported with the use of celecoxib or etoricoxib and compare this with the results seen in patients assigned to the placebo group. Furthermore, the risk of cardiovascular events found by using celecoxib or etoricoxib was also compared with that associated with the use of naproxen, a nonselective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) chosen as our reference drug.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

This review concluded that the risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event was greater with higher doses of celecoxib and with a greater underlying risk of such events. Despite some limitations in the review, the conclusion seems reliable for the populations evaluated in the trials, but might not be generalisable to populations treated with celecoxib on a long-term basis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

This review assessed the evidence for an increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The review included a number of large trials addressing diverse conditions and found that celecoxib was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction than placebo or any other treatment. Despite some poorly reported methodology, this conclusion is likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

This review evaluated the effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The authors concluded that COX-2 selective NSAIDs were similar to non-selective NSAIDs for the symptomatic relief of these conditions and provided superior GI tolerability. This was a well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions were likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

How do NSAIDs compare in reducing pain?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: May 1, 2011

To update a previous report on the comparative benefits and harms of oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, over-the-counter supplements (chondroitin and glucosamine), and topical agents (NSAIDs and rubefacients, including capsaicin) for osteoarthritis.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2011

We are uncertain as to whether NSAIDs can provide pain relief for chronic non‐cancer pain in children or adolescents.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: August 2, 2017

This summary will answer these questions: What is low back pain? How is low back pain treated? » Medicines » Nonmedicine treatments such as heat, exercise, and massage What have researchers found about treatments for low back pain? What are possible side effects of medicines to treat low back pain? What should I discuss with my health care professional about treating my low back pain?

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 15, 2016

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

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