Home > Search Results

Results: 41 to 60 of 194

The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model

The study found that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents could be cost-effective for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia when used closer to licence but that there is considerable uncertainty, mainly because of unknown impacts on overall survival.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: February 2016
Show search results within this document

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing irinotecan/platinum with etoposide/platinum in patients with previously untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer

The review found that irinotecan with platinum may be associated with higher overall response and survival rates than etoposide with platinum for previously untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer, with a differing side-effect profile. The authors suggested that their findings required cautious interpretation: this appears justified in view of the heterogeneity, small number and questionable quality of the primary studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Topotecan, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, paclitaxel, trabectedin and gemcitabine for advanced recurrent or refractory ovarian cancer: a systematic review and economic evaluation

The study was unable to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of platinum-based therapies with non-platinum-based therapies for platinum sensitive ovarian cancer. In people with platinum-sensitive disease, paclitaxel plus platinum could be considered cost-effective compared with platinum therapies alone at a threshold of £30,000 per additional quality-adjusted life-year. In people with disease which is resistant or refractory to platinum it is unlikely that topotecan would be considered cost-effective compared with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: January 2015
Show search results within this document

Clinical effectiveness of first-line chemoradiation for adult patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review

This review found that the research conducted in the area of chemoradiation for adult patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer was generally of poor quality and suffered from a lack of reporting of all important clinical findings. The trials included in the systematic review were too disparate to form any firm conclusions as to the effectiveness of individual chemotherapy agents or types of radiotherapy.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: February 2013
Show search results within this document

Bladder Cancer: Diagnosis and Management

Bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the UK, with just over 10,000 cases diagnosed each year (CRUK, 2013a). These are unevenly split between men (fourth most common cancer) and women (11th most common cancer).

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: February 2015
Show search results within this document

Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of first-line chemotherapy for adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and economic evaluation

Study provides a comprehensive framework of information for three subpopulations of patients with non-small cell lung cancer that clinicians can refer to as they attempt to balance patient factors, available treatments, treatment costs and adverse events in their daily decision-making.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2013
Show search results within this document

Ovarian Cancer: The Recognition and Initial Management of Ovarian Cancer

These clinical guidelines review a number of clinical questions that involve the detection, diagnosis and initial management of ovarian cancer and which focus on areas of uncertainty or where there is a wide variation in clinical practice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: April 2011
Show search results within this document

Taxanes as first-line therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and practice guideline

This review assessed the use of taxanes as first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. The authors concluded that taxane-cisplatin was effective as first-line treatment, whereas taxane-gemcitabine could be considered in the case of contraindication to platinum agents. The review had some methodological weaknesses but the authors' conclusions appear appropriate and are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: May 3, 2017

Treatment‐related early and late side effects on the kidney in survivors of childhood cancer

Over the past few decades, great improvements in diagnostics and treatment have resulted in a major increase in survival rates of childhood cancer. However, childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at great risk of developing adverse effects as a result of their cancer treatment. One of the potential adverse effects of childhood cancer treatment is kidney damage. Renal adverse effects are common during and just after treatment, but very little evidence is available on the frequency of renal function impairment in long‐term CCS and on what the risk factors are. Survivors with impaired renal function due to childhood cancer treatment are usually symptom free. The kidneys are remarkably well able to compensate for problems in their functioning. However, when renal late adverse events become symptomatic, survivors can experience a range of symptoms, depending on the kidney functions that are damaged. This systematic review aimed to assess the magnitude of asymptomatic and symptomatic early and late renal adverse events in long‐term CCS and to identify which risk factors contribute to impaired renal function.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Diagnosis and Management of Metastatic Malignant Disease of Unknown Primary Origin

The term “cancer of unknown primary” refers to a condition in which a patient has metastatic malignancy without an identified primary source. This is a very heterogeneous disease in which the type of tumour, the extent of spread, and the outcome of treatment all vary widely. When categorising patients with cancer of unknown primary, one important factor initially considered is the cell type of origin of the metastatic disease. The majority of patients have malignancy which appears to derive from epithelial cells, and hence are regarded as having carcinoma of unknown primary. Patients with tumours of non-epithelial lineage (melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, germ-cell) form a distinct and important minority, since subsequent management can often be satisfactorily undertaken even in the absence of an identifiable primary source. Such patients are not considered in this guideline, since their care is adequately defined in existing guidelines for their specific tumour type. The term “carcinoma of unknown primary” (CUP) is used henceforth to refer to those patients with metastatic malignancy of epithelial, neuroendocrine or undifferentiated lineage whose investigation and management is considered within the scope of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: July 2010
Show search results within this document

Chemotherapy primarily aimed at improving length of life while maintaining quality of life for incurable cervical cancer

Cervical cancer often affects young women. Cancer that has come back after initial treatment (recurrent) or has already spread around the body at diagnosis (metastatic) is incurable so chemotherapy is aimed at improving length of life, while maintaining good quality of life. A literature search was conducted identifying 30 potential trials; four trials were excluded. The 26 clinical trials included in this review encompass a large range of different drugs, doses and combinations in a mixed group of patients over a long time period (1976 to 2011), making it difficult to compare treatment options. Although there are no trials directly comparing chemotherapy with symptomatic management alone, chemotherapy is widely used in this setting and assumed to be of benefit. Cisplatin and carboplatin chemotherapy were shown to shrink the cancer in 10% to 30% of patients and are widely used in current practice. Cisplatin chemotherapy when combined with other drugs has been shown to prolong survival by a few months compared with cisplatin alone, but with the cost of increased side effects. Other chemotherapy has been used, but has been found to be less effective or more toxic. Quality of life for patients on chemotherapy appears to be similar for cisplatin and cisplatin‐based combinations. Nearly all patients in these studies were relatively fit and well prior to starting treatment, despite their cancer; these results may not be the same in patients who are not fit and well.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Treatment of Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review of Comparative Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness [Internet]

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States, and male Veterans seeking care at VA hospitals have a much higher age-specific incidence of lung cancer than males in the general population. The personal and economic significance of lung cancer has led to a vast research endeavor to try and identify new and more effective treatments. Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when the cancer is already advanced (stage IIIB or IV), and they are no longer candidates for surgical resection. Small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are different diseases in terms of treatment. Until recently, all therapies for advanced NSCLC were based on their cytotoxic properties. In the last few years, several novel agents aimed at specific molecular targets have been developed. This review was requested to evaluate the current evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of treatments for advanced lung cancer.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: October 2012
Show search results within this document

The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lung Cancer (Update)

This guidance updates and replaces NICE clinical guideline 24 (published February 2005).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: April 2011
Show search results within this document

Endometrial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of endometrial cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: February 2, 2017

Are any effective treatment options available for the management of granulosa cell tumour of the ovary?

Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) of the ovary are rare ovarian tumours (2% to 5% of all ovarian cancers). Most ovarian tumours arise from the outer surface layer of the ovary, but GCTs arise from granulosa cells (sex cord cells) within the ovaries that produce oestrogen (primary female sex hormones). These tumours grow relatively slowly and can recur 10 to 15 years after primary treatment. If women with these tumours want to have children, the surgeon usually removes only the diseased ovary. However, standard treatment has consisted of surgery to remove tubes, ovaries and uterus, as most women develop GCTs around the time of the menopause, when fertility is no longer a matter of concern.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

A coated, longer‐lasting form of doxorubicin hydrochloride for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

The choice of chemotherapy in women with relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is influenced by the duration of the platinum‐free interval, the length of time from the last platinum‐based cycle to the time of disease progression. Women who relapse within one month of receiving platinum therapy or who progress on therapy are considered to be platinum‐refractory; women who relapse between one and six months after platinum therapy are considered to be platinum‐resistant; and women who relapse more than six months after platinum therapy are considered to be platinum‐sensitive. The latter group is further subgrouped by women who relapse between six and 12 months after platinum therapy (partially platinum‐sensitive) and those who relapse after 12 months.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Are substances that inhibit the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis inhibitors), alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, likely to improve outcomes for women with ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women worldwide, with an annual incidence of about 6.3 cases per 100,000 women, and an annual mortality rate of 3.8 per 100,000 women. Standard treatment of advanced ovarian cancer usually involves surgery, to remove as much of the cancer as possible ('debulking'), and platinum‐based chemotherapy, with or without the addition of a taxane. However, despite good initial responses to platinum agents and taxanes, most women have disease relapse, require further treatment with chemotherapy, and eventually develop resistance to conventional chemotherapy drugs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Retinoblastoma Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of retinoblastoma in children.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: November 30, 2016

Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

The study found no strong evidence that any one epidermal growth factor receptor mutation test had greater accuracy than any other test when used to identify previously untreated adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: May 2014
Show search results within this document

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (311)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (5)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...