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Zonisamide add‐on for drug‐resistant partial epilepsy

Zonisamide in combination with another antiepileptic drug can reduce seizures, but with some adverse effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Zonisamide for neuropathic pain in adults

Neuropathic pain can arise from damage to nerves and injury to the central nervous system. It is different from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (a fall, or cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than those used for pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are not usually effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Antiepileptics other than gabapentin, pregabalin, topiramate, and valproate for preventing migraine attacks in adults

Various medicines, collectively termed 'antiepileptics', are used to treat epilepsy. For several years, three antiepileptics have also been recommended as drugs of first choice (topiramate and valproate) or third choice (gabapentin) for preventing migraine attacks. These three drugs, along with one other (pregabalin), are the subject of separate Cochrane reviews. For the present review, researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration reviewed the evidence about the effect of other antiepileptics in adult patients (≥ 16 years of age) with 'episodic' migraine (headache on < 15 days per month). They examined research published up to 15 January 2013 and found 10 studies of nine different antiepileptics. The majority of these drugs were no better than placebo for migraine prophylaxis (acetazolamide, carisbamate, clonazepam, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and vigabatrin). In one study each, carbamazepine and levetiracetam were better than placebo, and there was no significant difference between zonisamide and topiramate (a drug proven to be effective for migraine prophylaxis). None of these studies was of high methodological quality. The quantity and quality of the evidence were such that no firm conclusions could be drawn about the effect or lack of effect of any of the antiepileptics studied.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Comparing Fibromyalgia Drugs

How do drugs for fibromyalgia compare in improving symptoms?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: June 12, 2011

Treatment for epilepsy in pregnant women and the physical health of the child

For most women who have epilepsy, continuing their medication during pregnancy is important for their health. Over the last 25 years, research has shown that children exposed to these medications in the womb can be at a higher risk of having a malformation or birth defect.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

The use of antiepileptic drugs to prevent seizures following brain surgery

Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been used in trials to prevent seizures occurring after surgery in people with no previous history of epilepsy. A small number of trials have compared different AED treatments against each other, while others have compared AEDs to a placebo or no treatment group.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Comparing Antiepileptics for Bipolar Disorder, Migraines, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Pain

How do antiepileptics compare in treating bipolar disorder?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: October 1, 2010

Epilepsy in adults: Treatment with medication

Epilepsy medications can prevent seizures. But they do not work in everyone. It is sometimes possible for people to stop taking medication if they haven't had a seizure for several years.An epileptic seizure is caused by hyperactivity in the brain's nerve cells. Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) work by lowering this level of activity. Although AEDs do not cure the underlying causes of epilepsy, they can lower the risk of seizures.The medicine is available in the form of tablets, capsules or syrups. Some can also be injected into a vein, given intravenously through a drip (IV infusion), or inserted into the rectum in the form of a suppository. They can have some unpleasant side effects, but are usually well tolerated at low doses. That is why it is important for each individual person to consider whether to have treatment and, if so, what dose of which medication would be suitable.It is impossible to know beforehand whether a particular drug will help. Some people stop having seizures after taking the first medication they try. Other times it can take much longer to find the right treatment. In some cases the drugs do not help, or only help very little.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 13, 2016

Anticonvulsants for alcohol dependence

This review looked at evidence on the efficacy and acceptability of anticonvulsants alone or in combination with another medication or a psychosocial intervention for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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