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Hepatitis B vaccines achieve antibody production in patients with chronic renal failure, but we do not know if the vaccines are protective

Patients with chronic renal failure are at increased risk of hepatitis B virus infections. This review was undertaken to determine the beneficial and harmful effects of vaccination against hepatitis B and of a reinforced recombinant vaccination series. None of the trials had high methodological quality. Plasma vaccine was significantly more effective than placebo in achieving hepatitis B antibodies. Yet no statistically significant difference was found between the use of plasma vaccine or placebo in preventing hepatitis B virus infections. No trials comparing recombinant vaccine with placebo were identified. There was no significant difference between recombinant and plasma vaccines or between a reinforced vaccination series and routine vaccinations of three inoculations using recombinant vaccine regarding achieving hepatitis B antibodies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Hepatitis B vaccine, hepatitis B immunoglobulin, and hepatitis B vaccine plus immunoglobulin prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B

Hepatitis B vaccination and hepatitis B immunoglobulin are considered as preventive measures for newborn infants of HBsAg positive mothers. When all the identified trials were combined, hepatitis B vaccine alone, hepatitis B immunoglobulin alone, and hepatitis B vaccine plus hepatitis B immunoglobulin reduced perinatal transmission of hepatitis B compared with placebo or no intervention. Hepatitis B vaccine plus hepatitis B immunoglobulin were superior to hepatitis B vaccination alone. Adverse events were rare and mostly non‐serious.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Hepatitis B vaccine prevents hepatitis B infection in health‐care workers

Plasma‐derived vaccine significantly prevents hepatitis B events in health‐care workers. Recombinant vaccine does not significantly differ from plasma‐derived vaccine in eliciting protective hepatitis B surface antibody levels. Both vaccines are well tolerated. The intramuscular route causes significantly more systemic adverse events, and the intradermal route causes significantly more local adverse events. The deltoid injection seems more effective than the gluteal injection in eliciting antibodies. The standard vaccination schedule (0, 1, and 6 months) elicits a better antibody response than a rapid vaccination schedule (0, 1, and 2 months). It is unknown whether hepatitis B vaccine protects health‐care workers from infection of mutated hepatitis B virus.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Booster dose for preventing hepatitis B infection

Antibodies against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) wane over time following hepatitis B immunisation; hence, it is unclear whether people vaccinated in 3‐dose or 4‐dose schedules of the hepatitis B vaccine during their primary vaccination are still immune when the hepatitis B surface antibody (anti‐HBs) level in their body is undetectable, or lower than the level usually considered protective. This question may potentially be answered indirectly by measuring the anamnestic immune response to a booster dose of vaccine given to people previously immunised with the hepatitis B vaccine.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

In children or grown‐ups who have not been previously exposed to hepatitis B infection or whose exposure status is not known, hepatitis B vaccination as compared with no hepatitis B vaccination has an unclear effect on the risk of developing hepatitis B infection

Several million people world‐wide are infected with hepatitis B virus. The infection may cause serious short‐term and long‐term effects including portal hypertension, liver failure, liver cancer, and death. Hepatitis B vaccination is reported to be beneficial in some specific groups of people such as babies born to women infected with hepatitis B, health‐care workers, and people with long‐standing kidney failure. Whether hepatitis B vaccine is beneficial in people who have not been exposed to hepatitis B infection or those whose exposure status is not known is assessed in the present review.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Combined DTP‐HBV‐HIB vaccine versus separately administered DTP‐HBV and HIB vaccines in healthy infants up to two years old

Childhood vaccinations provide an effective method of protection against diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that routine infant immunisation programmes include a vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenza) type B (HIB) in the combined diphtheria‐tetanus‐pertussis (DTP)‐hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. We compared the combined DTP‐HBV‐HIB vaccine with the separate DTP‐HBV and HIB vaccines. Studies only reported on immunogenicity and reactogenicity.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Hepatitis B vaccination during pregnancy for preventing infant infection

Hepatitis B is an infection caused by the hepatitis B virus and occurs worldwide. For infants and children, the two main sources of the infection are transmission from an infected mother or living in an infected household. Perinatal transmission is common in highly endemic areas. Hepatitis B vaccines are available and require a series of three doses over six months. The most common side effects are pain at the vaccination site and mild to moderate fever. Maternal hepatitis B vaccine immunization may be a way of preventing hepatitis B infection in infants before hepatitis B vaccine can be administered and provide protection to the infant. Infected hepatitis B virus infants are more likely to develop complications such as chronic infection, cirrhosis or liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). This review found no evidence from randomized controlled trials regarding the effects of hepatitis B vaccine for preventing infant infection.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Hepatitis B virus vaccine for People Living With HIV/AIDS

This review seeks to determine whether vaccine for hepatitis B virus is effective in protecting people who have HIV against hepatitis B virus infection. It also seeks to determine if the vaccine is safe in people living with HIV.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Hepatitis B: Should I get tested or vaccinated?

Certain groups of people have a higher risk of becoming infected with hepatitis B. But on the whole, less than 1 out of 100 people in Germany have a hepatitis B infection. Adults who have no special risk do not seem to have health benefits from doing a test or from having a vaccination.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: December 5, 2012

Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about factors that may influence the risk of developing hepatocellular cancer and about research aimed at the prevention of this disease.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 31, 2015

Treating Chronic Hepatitis C: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary will discuss treatment options for chronic hepatitis C. It will tell you about research on how well medicines for chronic hepatitis C work. It will also tell you about research on the side effects of these medicines. It does not discuss screening and diagnosis of hepatitis C. This summary can help you talk with your doctor about which treatment might be best for you.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 27, 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

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