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Artemetherlumefantrine (six‐dose regimen) for treating uncomplicated malaria

Using a pilot system we have categorised this review as: Current question ‐ no update intended (topic covered in another review. Refer to: Sinclair D, Zani B, Donegan S, Olliaro P, Garner P. Artemisinin‐based combination therapy for treating uncomplicated malaria. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD007483. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007483.pub2.) Please see "Published notes" section of the review for more details.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Artemetherlumefantrine (four‐dose regimen) for treating uncomplicated malaria

Malaria is a parasitic disease spread by mosquitoes. It affects millions of people worldwide and causes significant illness and mortality. Uncomplicated malaria presents with symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle pain, and vomiting. The parasite has become resistant to a number of previously effective drugs, and so combinations of drugs are used to try to prevent further resistance. Artemetherlumefantrine is one such drug combination. This review of trials showed that, although the four‐dose artemetherlumefantrine regimen was superior to chloroquine, in general the four‐dose regimen was less effective compared with the six‐dose regimen or other drug combinations. The fact that the four‐dose regimen is generally less effective means it is unlikely that it would be used for treating uncomplicated malaria.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Dihydroartemisinin‐piperaquine for treating uncomplicated malaria

This review summarises trials evaluating the effects of dihydroartemisinin‐piperaquine (DHA‐P) compared to other artemisinin‐based combination therapies recommended by the World Health Organization. After searching for relevant trials up to July 2013, we included 27 randomized controlled trials, enrolling 16,382 adults and children and conducted between 2002 and 2010.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Artemisinin‐based combination treatments for uncomplicated malaria

Malaria is a major cause of illness and death in many of the world's poorest countries. It is spread from person to person by the bite of mosquitoes infected with a microorganism called Plasmodium. The Plasmodium species P. falciparum is the most common cause of malaria worldwide and causes the majority of deaths. Uncomplicated malaria is the mild form of the disease which, if left untreated, can progress rapidly to become life threatening. The drugs traditionally used to treat uncomplicated malaria have become ineffective in many parts of the world due to the development of drug resistance.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Artesunate plus pyronaridine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

Uncomplicated malaria is the milder form of malaria which usually causes fever, with or without headache, tiredness, muscle pains, abdominal pains, nausea, and vomiting. If left untreated, uncomplicated malaria can rapidly develop into severe malaria with kidney failure, fitting, unconsciousness, and eventually death. Plasmodium falciparum is the most common parasite causing malaria in sub‐Saharan Africa and causes most of the severe malaria worldwide.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Artemisinin‐based combination therapy (ACT) for treating non‐severe malaria due to Plasmodium vivax

P. vivax is one of five species of the malaria parasite known to cause clinical illness. It is a common cause of malaria in Asia, South America and Oceania. Unlike P. falciparum (the commonest cause of malaria in Africa), P. vivax has a liver stage which is not treated by most common antimalarial drugs. This liver stage can become active and cause a relapse of clinical illness weeks or even years after the initial illness.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Artemisinin‐naphthoquine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

This Cochrane Review summarises trials evaluating the effects of artemisinin‐naphthoquine compared to other artemisinin‐based combination therapies (ACTs) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for treating adults and children with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. After searching for relevant trials up to January 2015, we included four randomized controlled trials, enrolling 740 adults and children.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Azithromycin is not useful as monotherapy for uncomplicated malaria. In combinations with other antimalarials, it may need to be used at high doses, potentially affecting tolerability.

To help prevent the malaria parasite from developing resistance to antimalarial medicines, the WHO recommends the use of combination therapy, where malaria infections are treated with more than one drug simultaneously. As azithromycin is an antibiotic that also has an effect on the malaria parasite, we assessed its efficacy and tolerability as an antimalarial when used alone or as part of combination therapy with other antimalarials. Our review of studies conducted over the past 14 years suggests that azithromycin is a relatively weak antimalarial whose efficacy depends on the drug dose and the partner drug in the combination therapy. The data suggest that, among adults, the higher doses needed to achieve an acceptable level of treatment success with malaria may be less well tolerated. Unless the ongoing product and dose optimisation process results in a universally efficacious product or identifies a specific niche application that is complementary to the current scala of more efficacious antimalarial combinations, azithromycin's future as an antimalarial does not look promising.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

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