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Bone Graft

The transplantation of healthy bone from one part of the body to replace injured or diseased bone in another part of the body.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Corticosteroid regimens for treatment of acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD) after allogenic stem cell transplantation

Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat acute and chronic graft‐versus‐host disease (GvHD) but their effect on length and quality of life of patients has not been studied systematically. In this systematic review, we tried to compare the effect of treatment regimens used for GvHD in the absence and presence of corticosteroids, or with different doses of corticosteroids. After searching relevant sources, we located only two studies that met our criteria to be included in the study. Their results are described in detail in the text of the review. In brief, these studies are in favor earlier remission and slightly better outcome in patients but more evidence is needed in this field.

Anti‐thymocyte globulins for the prevention of graft‐versus‐host disease in patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation

Allogeneic haematopoietic (blood) stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative therapeutic option for a variety of malignant and some non‐malignant haematological (blood‐related) diseases. For this therapy, blood stem cells are transferred from a healthy person who has compatible tissue markers, so‐called human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers, to a matched recipient. Even though the donor and the recipient are matched concerning these markers, immune cells that are part of the transferred cells ('the graft') are prone to recognise tissues of the recipient ('the host') as being to some extent incompatible or foreign, which then can induce inflammation ('graft‐versus‐host‐disease' or 'GVHD'). GVHD typically involves the skin, the gastrointestinal tract and the liver. GVHD is divided into acute and chronic forms based on the clinical features and the time of occurrence after transplantation. In order to prevent this potentially life‐threatening condition, reactive immune cells can be depleted in the recipient by administering antibodies which are directed against them. These antibodies are called anti‐thymocyte globulins (ATG) and are derived from animals which were immunised with human thymocytes or T‐cells. Different types of ATG have been used for decades to decrease the occurrence and severity of GVHD but they bear the risk of severe side effects such as increased infection rates or the risk of disease relapse. Also, severe side effects such as allergic reactions or serum sickness with shortness of breath and fever, blood coagulation disturbances or liver failure can harm the patient during the infusion of ATG. So far, no systematic analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the use of ATG has been done.

Processed versus fresh frozen bone for repairing the bone in revision hip surgery

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the advantages and disadvantages of using fresh frozen bone or processed bone for repairing the hip bone during surgery.

See all (486)

Summaries for consumers

Corticosteroid regimens for treatment of acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD) after allogenic stem cell transplantation

Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat acute and chronic graft‐versus‐host disease (GvHD) but their effect on length and quality of life of patients has not been studied systematically. In this systematic review, we tried to compare the effect of treatment regimens used for GvHD in the absence and presence of corticosteroids, or with different doses of corticosteroids. After searching relevant sources, we located only two studies that met our criteria to be included in the study. Their results are described in detail in the text of the review. In brief, these studies are in favor earlier remission and slightly better outcome in patients but more evidence is needed in this field.

Anti‐thymocyte globulins for the prevention of graft‐versus‐host disease in patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation

Allogeneic haematopoietic (blood) stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative therapeutic option for a variety of malignant and some non‐malignant haematological (blood‐related) diseases. For this therapy, blood stem cells are transferred from a healthy person who has compatible tissue markers, so‐called human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers, to a matched recipient. Even though the donor and the recipient are matched concerning these markers, immune cells that are part of the transferred cells ('the graft') are prone to recognise tissues of the recipient ('the host') as being to some extent incompatible or foreign, which then can induce inflammation ('graft‐versus‐host‐disease' or 'GVHD'). GVHD typically involves the skin, the gastrointestinal tract and the liver. GVHD is divided into acute and chronic forms based on the clinical features and the time of occurrence after transplantation. In order to prevent this potentially life‐threatening condition, reactive immune cells can be depleted in the recipient by administering antibodies which are directed against them. These antibodies are called anti‐thymocyte globulins (ATG) and are derived from animals which were immunised with human thymocytes or T‐cells. Different types of ATG have been used for decades to decrease the occurrence and severity of GVHD but they bear the risk of severe side effects such as increased infection rates or the risk of disease relapse. Also, severe side effects such as allergic reactions or serum sickness with shortness of breath and fever, blood coagulation disturbances or liver failure can harm the patient during the infusion of ATG. So far, no systematic analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the use of ATG has been done.

Processed versus fresh frozen bone for repairing the bone in revision hip surgery

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the advantages and disadvantages of using fresh frozen bone or processed bone for repairing the hip bone during surgery.

See all (94)

More about Bone Graft

Photo of an adult

Also called: Transplantation of bone

Other terms to know:
Arteries, Bone, Veins

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