Home > Health A – Z > Dysarthria

Dysarthria

A condition in which problems occur with the muscles that help produce speech, often making it very difficult to pronounce words. It is unrelated to any problem understanding language.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: Wikipedia)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Speech therapy for children with dysarthria ac quired before three years of age

This review aimed to investigate if therapy is generally effective for children with dysarthria acquired early in life, and if certain types of therapy may be better than others.

Interventions for speech problems (dysarthria) after stroke or other non‐progressive brain injury

Brain damage caused by stroke, injury or other non‐progressive disease can make speech unclear and difficult for listeners to understand. This condition is known as dysarthria and it occurs when face, tongue, and throat muscles are weak, slow, and unco‐ordinated. Dysarthria can cause people who are affected to lose confidence when talking and become socially isolated, even if others see symptoms as mild. People with dysarthria do not have difficulties thinking, remembering, or retrieving words.

Behavioral management of respiratory/phonatory dysfunction from dysarthria: a systematic review of the evidence

Bibliographic details: Yorkston K M, Spencer K A, Duffy J R.  Behavioral management of respiratory/phonatory dysfunction from dysarthria: a systematic review of the evidence. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology 2003; 11(2): 13-38

See all (41)

Summaries for consumers

Speech therapy for children with dysarthria ac quired before three years of age

This review aimed to investigate if therapy is generally effective for children with dysarthria acquired early in life, and if certain types of therapy may be better than others.

Interventions for speech problems (dysarthria) after stroke or other non‐progressive brain injury

Brain damage caused by stroke, injury or other non‐progressive disease can make speech unclear and difficult for listeners to understand. This condition is known as dysarthria and it occurs when face, tongue, and throat muscles are weak, slow, and unco‐ordinated. Dysarthria can cause people who are affected to lose confidence when talking and become socially isolated, even if others see symptoms as mild. People with dysarthria do not have difficulties thinking, remembering, or retrieving words.

Controlled studies for treatment of dysarthia associated with acquired brain injury in childhood urgently required

Dysarthria is a disorder of speech production that can make it harder for people to be understood by others.  Dysarthria is a common and often chronic outcome associated with brain injury suffered in childhood (also known as paediatric acquired brain injury (ABI) ).

See all (9)

More about Dysarthria

Photo of an adult woman

See Also: Apraxia of Speech, Aphasia

Other terms to know:
Brain, Muscles

Keep up with systematic reviews on Dysarthria:

Create RSS

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...