Home > Health A – Z > Dengue Fever

Dengue Fever

A mosquito-borne tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: Wikipedia)

About Dengue Fever

Dengue is caused by any one of four related viruses transmitted by mosquitoes. There are not yet any vaccines to prevent infection with dengue virus and the most effective protective measures are those that avoid mosquito bites.

When infected, early recognition and prompt supportive treatment can substantially lower the risk of medical complications and death.

Dengue has emerged as a worldwide problem only since the 1950s. Although dengue rarely occurs in the continental United States, it is endemic in Puerto Rico and in many popular tourist destinations in Latin America, Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands....Read more about Dengue Fever
CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Corticosteroids for treating dengue infection in children and adults

Dengue is a disease caused by a virus transmitted by mosquitoes, occurring in many resource‐limited countries, and children are often most severely affected. Most infected patients will recover with mild symptoms, but a few progress to severe dengue and may die. There is no specific treatment for dengue, but some clinicians provide corticosteroids at an early stage to prevent progression to severe dengue disease; and some treat patients with dengue‐related shock with corticosteroids to improve survival. It is important to summarise the effects of corticosteroids in dengue.

Predictive symptoms and signs of severe dengue disease for patients with dengue fever: a meta-analysis

The aim of the meta-analysis was to provide more solid evidence for the reliability of the new classification. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Armed Forces Pest Management Board Literature Retrieval System, and Google Scholar up to August 2012. A pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using either a random-effect or a fixed-effect model. A total of 16 papers were identified. Among the 11 factors studied, five symptoms demonstrated an increased risk for SDD, including bleeding [OR: 13.617; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.281, 56.508], vomiting/nausea (OR: 1.692; 95% CI: 1.256, 2.280), abdominal pain (OR: 2.278; 95% CI: 1.631, 3.182), skin rashes (OR: 2.031; 95% CI: 1.269, 3.250), and hepatomegaly (OR: 4.751; 95% CI: 1.769, 12.570). Among the four bleeding-related symptoms including hematemesis, melena, gum bleeding, and epistaxis, only hematemesis (OR: 6.174; 95% CI: 2.66, 14.334; P < 0.001) and melena (OR: 10.351; 95% CI: 3.065, 34.956; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with SDD. No significant associations with SDD were found for gender, lethargy, retroorbital pain, diarrhea, or tourniquet test, whereas headache appeared protective (OR: 0.555; 95% CI: 0.455, 0.676). The meta-analysis suggests that bleeding (hematemesis/melena), vomiting/nausea, abdominal pain, skin rashes, and hepatomegaly may predict the development of SDD in patients with DF, while headache may predict otherwise.

Ophthalmic complications of dengue fever: a systematic review

INTRODUCTION: In recent years there has been a spurt of peer-reviewed publications on the ophthalmic complications of dengue fever. The authors aim to review the ocular manifestations, utility of relevant diagnostic tests, management, prognosis, and sequelae of dengue-related ocular complications.

See all (31)

Summaries for consumers

Corticosteroids for treating dengue infection in children and adults

Dengue is a disease caused by a virus transmitted by mosquitoes, occurring in many resource‐limited countries, and children are often most severely affected. Most infected patients will recover with mild symptoms, but a few progress to severe dengue and may die. There is no specific treatment for dengue, but some clinicians provide corticosteroids at an early stage to prevent progression to severe dengue disease; and some treat patients with dengue‐related shock with corticosteroids to improve survival. It is important to summarise the effects of corticosteroids in dengue.

Continuous negative extrathoracic pressure or continuous positive airway pressure for children with acute respiratory failure and shortage of oxygen

Children develop respiratory failure and shortage of oxygen when they have infectious or non‐infectious respiratory illnesses. Continuous negative extrathoracic pressure (CNEP) which keeps lungs open by creating negative pressure on the chest or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) which keeps lungs open by delivering positive pressure in the lungs during all phases of breathing are used to help increase blood oxygen levels in respiratory failure and thereby reduce organ damage and risk of death. However, the safety and efficacy of these methods of respiratory support are uncertain. The searches for this review were updated in July 2013.

More about Dengue Fever

Photo of an adult

Also called: Dengue, Break-bone fever, Dengue virus infection

Other terms to know:
Arthralgia, Disease Vector, Myalgia (Muscle Ache)

Keep up with systematic reviews on Dengue Fever:

Create RSS

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...