Home > Health A – Z > Ichthyosis

Ichthyosis

A group of inherited or acquired skin disorders characterized by a dry, thickened, and scaly skin. The skin changes range from mild to severe.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

About Ichthyosis

Ichthyosis is a family of disorders characterized by dry or scaly and thickened skin. "Ichthy" comes from the Greek word for fish. This condition is called "ichthyosis" because the thickened skin sometimes has the appearance of fish scales.

Ichthyosis may be either inherited or acquired. Inherited ichthyosis is usually apparent during the first year of life, often at birth, and continues to affect a person throughout life. Acquired ichthyosis may occur as the result of medical problems including hormonal, inflammatory, or malignant disorders. This fact sheet focuses on inherited ichthyosis.

What Are the Different Types of Ichthyosis?

There are many different types of inherited ichthyosis. Most types involve only the skin, and some regions of the skin may be more severely affected than others. Other types involve internal organs as well as the skin, and are referred to as syndromic types of ichthyosis....Read more about Ichthyosis NIH - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

A systematic review of clinical trials of treatments for the congenital ichthyoses, excluding ichthyosis vulgaris

BACKGROUND: The ichthyoses comprise a group of inherited disorders of keratinization. Because of the need for lifelong treatment, it is important that therapies are beneficial, safe, and well tolerated.

Topical tacrolimus for atopic dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis (AD) (or atopic eczema) is a chronic skin condition that affects the quality of life of both adults and children. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are the main ointments used for treatment, but there is a risk of side‐effects with their use, such as skin thinning. A class of drugs called topical calcineurin inhibitors, which include topical tacrolimus (and pimecrolimus), might provide an alternative to this problem, but since tacrolimus is a newer ointment compared with corticosteroids, there are still some questions about its effectiveness and safety.

Atopic Eczema in Children: Management of Atopic Eczema in Children from Birth up to the Age of 12 Years

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory itchy skin condition that develops in early childhood in the majority of cases. It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation (flares, which may occur as frequently as two or three per month) and remissions, except for severe cases where it may be continuous. Certain patterns of atopic eczema are recognised. In infants, atopic eczema usually involves the face and extensor surfaces of the limbs and, while it may involve the trunk, the napkin area is usually spared. A few infants may exhibit a discoid pattern (circular patches). In older children flexural involvement predominates, as in adults. Diagnostic criteria are discussed in Chapter 3. As with other atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), atopic eczema often has a genetic component. In atopic eczema, inherited factors affect the development of the skin barrier, which can lead to exacerbation of the disease by a large number of trigger factors, including irritants and allergens. Many cases of atopic eczema clear or improve during childhood while others persist into adulthood, and some children who have atopic eczema `will go on to develop asthma and/or allergic rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The epidemiology of atopic eczema is considered in Chapter 5, and the impact of the condition on children and their families/caregivers is considered in Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

Summaries for consumers

Topical tacrolimus for atopic dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis (AD) (or atopic eczema) is a chronic skin condition that affects the quality of life of both adults and children. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are the main ointments used for treatment, but there is a risk of side‐effects with their use, such as skin thinning. A class of drugs called topical calcineurin inhibitors, which include topical tacrolimus (and pimecrolimus), might provide an alternative to this problem, but since tacrolimus is a newer ointment compared with corticosteroids, there are still some questions about its effectiveness and safety.

More about Ichthyosis

Photo of an adult woman

Other terms to know:
Genetic, Skin

Keep up with systematic reviews on Ichthyosis:

Create RSS

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...