Home > Health A – Z > Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

Inflammation of the prostate gland that begins suddenly and gets worse quickly. It is caused by a bacterial infection. Symptoms include fever and chills, body aches, pain in the lower back and genital area, a burning feeling during urination, and problems with emptying the bladder all the way.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

About Acute and Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

A bacterial infection of the prostate causes bacterial prostatitis.

The acute type happens suddenly and lasts a short time, while the chronic type develops slowly and lasts a long time, often years.

The infection may occur when bacteria travel from the urethra into the prostate...Read more about Prostatitis NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Interventions to treat chronic infection of the prostate gland (chronic bacterial prostatitis)

Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) involves infection and inflammation of the prostate gland in men of all ages. It can cause problems urinating, including discomfort and pain, increased frequency and urge, or problems emptying the bladder. Bacteria infecting the prostate are the cause of CBP. These bacteria may be sexually transmitted. To cure CBP, antibiotics must be administered for extended periods of time (four weeks or longer), but a permanent cure is not always guaranteed. Other drugs may be combined with antibiotics to improve CBP symptoms. This review found that fluoroquinolones like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin or prulifloxacin have equivalent effects and equivalent success rates in CBP patients. If atypical bacteria like chlamydia are suspected to cause CBP, macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin may achieve better results compared to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. It must be taken into account that some of the studies that have been performed are of poor quality or have been performed on small numbers of participants. More studies are needed, focusing on new agents or on optimized doses of currently prescribed antibiotics.

Little evidence that antibiotics or alpha‐blocker drugs help to relieve chronic abacterial prostatitis, but heat treatments might be effective and more research is needed.

Chronic abacterial prostatitis (CAP) involves inflammation of the prostate gland and commonly affects men of all ages. It can cause problems urinating, including discomfort and pain, increased frequency and urge, or problems emptying the bladder. In most cases, the cause is unknown. Treatments for CAP include heat treatments (using microwaves) and several different types of drugs. The review found that there is little evidence to support the routine use of antibiotic or alpha‐blocking drugs for CAP. Heat treatments in comparison may be useful. However, the few studies that have been performed are generally of poor quality. More studies are needed.

The use of pregabalin analgesia for patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome

It has been suggested that chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is due to pain caused by the nerves in or around the prostate. Pregabalin is a pain killer that is specific for nerve pain. Therefore we conducted a search of the literature to evaluate the use of pregabalin for this ailment and whether or not it was better than placebo.

See all (43)

Summaries for consumers

Interventions to treat chronic infection of the prostate gland (chronic bacterial prostatitis)

Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) involves infection and inflammation of the prostate gland in men of all ages. It can cause problems urinating, including discomfort and pain, increased frequency and urge, or problems emptying the bladder. Bacteria infecting the prostate are the cause of CBP. These bacteria may be sexually transmitted. To cure CBP, antibiotics must be administered for extended periods of time (four weeks or longer), but a permanent cure is not always guaranteed. Other drugs may be combined with antibiotics to improve CBP symptoms. This review found that fluoroquinolones like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin or prulifloxacin have equivalent effects and equivalent success rates in CBP patients. If atypical bacteria like chlamydia are suspected to cause CBP, macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin may achieve better results compared to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. It must be taken into account that some of the studies that have been performed are of poor quality or have been performed on small numbers of participants. More studies are needed, focusing on new agents or on optimized doses of currently prescribed antibiotics.

Little evidence that antibiotics or alpha‐blocker drugs help to relieve chronic abacterial prostatitis, but heat treatments might be effective and more research is needed.

Chronic abacterial prostatitis (CAP) involves inflammation of the prostate gland and commonly affects men of all ages. It can cause problems urinating, including discomfort and pain, increased frequency and urge, or problems emptying the bladder. In most cases, the cause is unknown. Treatments for CAP include heat treatments (using microwaves) and several different types of drugs. The review found that there is little evidence to support the routine use of antibiotic or alpha‐blocking drugs for CAP. Heat treatments in comparison may be useful. However, the few studies that have been performed are generally of poor quality. More studies are needed.

The use of pregabalin analgesia for patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome

It has been suggested that chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is due to pain caused by the nerves in or around the prostate. Pregabalin is a pain killer that is specific for nerve pain. Therefore we conducted a search of the literature to evaluate the use of pregabalin for this ailment and whether or not it was better than placebo.

See all (7)

Terms to know

Bacterial Infections
An acute infectious disorder caused by gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria.
Bladder
The organ that stores urine.
Glands
A group of cells that secrete substances. Endocrine glands secrete hormones. Exocrine glands secrete salt, enzymes, and water.
Prostate
A gland in the male reproductive system. The prostate surrounds the part of the urethra (the tube that empties the bladder) just below the bladder, and produces a fluid that forms part of the semen.
Urethra
The tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.

More about Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

Photo of an adult man

See Also: Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis, Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis, Chronic Prostatitis

Other terms to know: See all 5
Bacterial Infections, Bladder, Glands

Keep up with systematic reviews on Acute Bacterial Prostatitis:

Create RSS

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...