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Rhabdomyolysis

Rhabdomyolysis is a condition in which damaged skeletal muscle tissue breaks down rapidly. Breakdown products of damaged muscle cells are released into the bloodstream. Some of these, such as the protein myoglobin, are harmful to the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: Wikipedia)

About Rhabdomyolysis

Rhabdomyolysis is an extremely rare but serious side effect where muscle tissue gradually breaks down in certain muscles. This can lead to permanent paralysis, and the breakdown products can cause serious kidney damage.

In studies, rhabdomyolysis was found to occur in 1 out of 10,000 people who took statins for longer periods of time.

Signs of this side effect include muscle ache and dark-colored urine, so it is important to seek medical advice if you have these symptoms. Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Is continuous renal replacement therapy beneficial for people with rhabdomyolysis?

Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life‐threatening condition where damaged muscle tissue breaks down quickly, and products of damaged muscle cells are released into the bloodstream. Of these products, a protein called myoglobin is harmful to kidney health and can lead to acute kidney injury. There is some evidence to suggest that continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may provide benefits for people with rhabdomyolysis.

Rhabdomyolysis in bariatric surgery: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Rhabdomyolysis (RML) is a rare complication of bariatric surgery. A systematic review was performed to identify risk factors and patient outcomes in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery who develop RML.

Prevention of kidney injury following rhabdomyolysis: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic literature review to evaluate evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of rhabdomyolysis-associated acute renal failure (ARF).

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Summaries for consumers

Is continuous renal replacement therapy beneficial for people with rhabdomyolysis?

Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life‐threatening condition where damaged muscle tissue breaks down quickly, and products of damaged muscle cells are released into the bloodstream. Of these products, a protein called myoglobin is harmful to kidney health and can lead to acute kidney injury. There is some evidence to suggest that continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may provide benefits for people with rhabdomyolysis.

Medication for the treatment of high cholesterol levels

High cholesterol levels could mean an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Certain medications that reduce cholesterol levels can prevent related health problems and increase life expectancy. Whether or not it is worth taking these medications will depend on what other risk factors you have.If the risk of cardiovascular disease cannot be reduced enough through general measures, treatment with medication can be considered. Whether or not it is worth taking medication will vary from person to person, depending on what other risk factors for cardiovascular disease they have and how important the advantages and disadvantages are to them.People’s individual approach to health will play a role too. If someone has unfavorable cholesterol levels but they do not have any other risk factors, or only a few, then they might prefer not to take medication. People who have several other risk factors might be more concerned so they might be more willing to take medication.When deciding whether or not to have a certain treatment, it can help to know what advantages and disadvantages the treatment has. Various groups of drugs can reduce cholesterol levels. But only one group of drugs, known as statins, has been well studied for the treatment of people who have never had a heart attack, stroke or other type of cardiovascular disease. Statins lower the risk of vascular disease by about 20% in these people. The health impact of this risk reduction will vary from person to person, though, mostly depending on their individual risk of cardiovascular disease. A doctor can help you determine your personal risk.Already having cardiovascular problems such as coronary artery disease is one major factor. If that is the case, it greatly increases the risk of heart attack or stroke. Medication can be used to reduce this risk very effectively.

Medication for the long-term treatment of coronary artery disease

The long-term treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) mainly involves taking medication. Various medications can relieve the symptoms and lower the risk of complications.In order to prevent the development of related medical conditions, all people who have coronary artery disease (CAD) are advised to take two types of medication: Antiplatelets to prevent blood clots, and statins to protect the blood vessels.Beta blockers are sometimes taken too, to reduce the heart's workload, particularly in people who have heart failure or high blood pressure.Good-quality studies have proven that these medications can lower the risk of complications such as heart attacks or strokes. People who have certain other medical conditions too may take other medications such as ACE inhibitors. But even the very best treatment with medications will offer only limited protection from heart disease.All medications can have side effects. Yet it is often possible to avoid them by adjusting the dose or by choosing a different medication in the same group of drugs. The side effects often go away after a while too, once the body has got used to the medication.The risk of side effects may increase when two or more medications are taken together, because they may interact. It is therefore important to tell your doctor what medication you are already taking.Generally speaking, the more risk factors someone has, the more likely it is that he or she will benefit from medication. The important thing is to continue to take your medication and to take it regularly – its protective effect lasts only as long as it is taken.

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More about Rhabdomyolysis

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See Also: Kidney

Other terms to know:
Myoglobin

Keep up with systematic reviews on Rhabdomyolysis:

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