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Hodgkin Lymphoma

A malignant disease characterized by enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Library of Mediciine)

About Hodgkin Lymphoma

Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

Adult Hodgkin lymphoma is a type of cancer that develops in the lymph system, part of the body's immune system.

The lymph system is made up of the following:

Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma is a type of cancer that develops in the lymph system, which is part of the body's immune system....Read more about Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

High‐dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of single lymph nodes, the lymphatic system, and might affect other additional organs. It is a relatively rare disease, accounting for two or three people per 100,000 every year in Western countries, but it is one of the most common cancers in young adults between 20 and 30 years of age. The second peak of the disease is after the age of 60 years. Treatment options for HL have improved since the 1980s, so that even patients in advanced stages may be cured with adequate therapy. Treatment approaches include chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (combined‐modality treatment), of which the combined‐modality treatment is standard for most patients nowadays. Nevertheless, 15% to 20% of patients do not reach complete remission and have refractory disease or relapse. For these patients high‐dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has become the optimal treatment option. However, the impact of this regimen on overall survival is still unclear. Therefore, we conducted a Cochrane Review on efficacy and safety of HDCT followed by ASCT in patients with primary refractory or relapsed HL. We searched several important medical databases (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and MEDLINE) and summarised and analysed evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We identified three RCTs corresponding to our pre‐defined inclusion criteria treating 398 patients. We included two trials that compared HDCT followed by ASCT versus conventional chemotherapy alone, and one trial evaluating additional sequential HDCT (SHDCT) followed by ASCT against HDCT followed by ASCT.

Imaging‐adapted therapy for individuals with Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignant disease of the lymphatic system of the body. It accounts for 10% to 15% of all lymphoma in industrialised countries and tends to show two peaks in incidence at around 30 and 60 years of age. While it is considered a relatively rare disease, it is one of the most common malignancies in young adults. With cure rates of up to 90% over 5 years, it is one of the most curable cancers worldwide.

Treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of the lymphatic system. It occurs in children and adults, but it is more common in the third decade of life. It is one of the most curable forms of cancer. There are four stages of HL, stages I and II are considered as early stage HL and stages III and IV as advanced stage. Using risk factors such as presence or absence of bulky disease and presence or absence of B‐symptoms, like night sweats or fever, early stage HL is further classified into early favourable and early unfavourable stages. Treatment options are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. Radiotherapy may have, more treatment‐ related side effects than chemotherapy, including second malignancies; this applies at least to the large treatment fields used in the past. However, with modern, very limited treatment fields, the risks of long‐term side effects caused by radiotherapy have been reduced significantly.

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Summaries for consumers

High‐dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of single lymph nodes, the lymphatic system, and might affect other additional organs. It is a relatively rare disease, accounting for two or three people per 100,000 every year in Western countries, but it is one of the most common cancers in young adults between 20 and 30 years of age. The second peak of the disease is after the age of 60 years. Treatment options for HL have improved since the 1980s, so that even patients in advanced stages may be cured with adequate therapy. Treatment approaches include chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (combined‐modality treatment), of which the combined‐modality treatment is standard for most patients nowadays. Nevertheless, 15% to 20% of patients do not reach complete remission and have refractory disease or relapse. For these patients high‐dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has become the optimal treatment option. However, the impact of this regimen on overall survival is still unclear. Therefore, we conducted a Cochrane Review on efficacy and safety of HDCT followed by ASCT in patients with primary refractory or relapsed HL. We searched several important medical databases (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and MEDLINE) and summarised and analysed evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We identified three RCTs corresponding to our pre‐defined inclusion criteria treating 398 patients. We included two trials that compared HDCT followed by ASCT versus conventional chemotherapy alone, and one trial evaluating additional sequential HDCT (SHDCT) followed by ASCT against HDCT followed by ASCT.

Imaging‐adapted therapy for individuals with Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignant disease of the lymphatic system of the body. It accounts for 10% to 15% of all lymphoma in industrialised countries and tends to show two peaks in incidence at around 30 and 60 years of age. While it is considered a relatively rare disease, it is one of the most common malignancies in young adults. With cure rates of up to 90% over 5 years, it is one of the most curable cancers worldwide.

Treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of the lymphatic system. It occurs in children and adults, but it is more common in the third decade of life. It is one of the most curable forms of cancer. There are four stages of HL, stages I and II are considered as early stage HL and stages III and IV as advanced stage. Using risk factors such as presence or absence of bulky disease and presence or absence of B‐symptoms, like night sweats or fever, early stage HL is further classified into early favourable and early unfavourable stages. Treatment options are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. Radiotherapy may have, more treatment‐ related side effects than chemotherapy, including second malignancies; this applies at least to the large treatment fields used in the past. However, with modern, very limited treatment fields, the risks of long‐term side effects caused by radiotherapy have been reduced significantly.

See all (40)

Terms to know

Cancer (Malignant Neoplasm)
A term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and can invade nearby tissues. Cancer cells can also spread to other parts of the body.
Immune System
The body's system for protecting itself from viruses and bacteria or any foreign substances.
Lymph Nodes
A rounded mass of lymphatic tissue that is surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue. Lymph nodes filter lymph (lymphatic fluid), and they store lymphocytes (white blood cells). They are located along lymphatic vessels. Also called lymph gland.
Lymphatic System
The tissues and organs that produce, store, and carry white blood cells that fight infections and other diseases. This system includes the bone marrow, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, and lymphatic vessels (a network of thin tubes that carry lymph and white blood cells). Lymphatic vessels branch, like blood vessels, into all the tissues of the body.
Lymphoid
Referring to lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Also refers to tissue in which lymphocytes develop.
Lymphoma
Cancer that begins in cells of the immune system.
Reed-Sternberg Cells
A type of cell that appears in people with Hodgkin disease. The number of these cells increases as the disease advances.
Spleen
An organ that is part of the lymphatic system. The spleen makes lymphocytes, filters the blood, stores blood cells, and destroys old blood cells. It is located on the left side of the abdomen near the stomach.
Tissue
A group of cells that act together to carry out a specific function in the body. Examples include muscle tissue, nervous system tissue (including the brain, spinal cord, and nerves), and connective tissue (including ligaments, tendons, bones, and fat). Organs are made up of tissues.

More about Hodgkin Lymphoma

Photo of an adult woman

Also called: Hodgkin disease, Hodgkin's disease, Hodgkin's lymphoma, HL, HD

See Also: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Other terms to know: See all 9
Cancer (Malignant Neoplasm), Immune System, Lymph Nodes

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