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Glomerulosclerosis

Scarring of the glomeruli. It may result from diabetes (diabetic glomerulosclerosis) or from deposits in parts of the glomeruli (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). The most common signs of glomerulosclerosis are proteinuria and chronic kidney disease.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Immunosuppressive treatment for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults

Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare disease whose cause is unknown and is a condition in which the glomeruli leak protein from the blood into the urine. It is described as focal because only some of the glomeruli become scarred (while others remain normal) and segmental as only part of an individual glomerulus is damaged. Over half of all persons with FSGS will develop chronic kidney failure within 10 years. Thus, immunosuppressive strategies are used to control proteinuria and prevent kidney failure. This systematic review identified four studies (108 participants) investigating immunosuppressive treatments for adults with biopsy‐proven FSGS. Adult patients treated with cyclosporin A in combination with prednisone were more likely to achieve partial remission of nephrotic syndrome compared with prednisone alone, however this result is based on only one small study. No data was available on the progression to kidney failure or death.

Mycophenolate mofetil for primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: systematic review

BACKGROUND: Current treatments for primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), including corticosteroids and cyclosporine, are not satisfactory for all patients and may induce significant side effects. Antidotal benefits of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as an add-on to these immunosuppressive therapies have been reported. This review aims to systematically summarize the efficacy and safety of MMF as a treatment for primary FSGS.

Rituximab treatment for relapsing minimal change disease and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: a systematic review

This review concluded that rituximab was generally well tolerated and could reduce relapse rates and the use of immunosuppressants for adults with frequently relapsing or steroid-dependent, minimal-change disease or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Limitations in the review and the evidence suggest that these conclusions and recommendations for practice may not be reliable; the recommendations for better evidence seem appropriate.

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Summaries for consumers

Immunosuppressive treatment for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults

Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare disease whose cause is unknown and is a condition in which the glomeruli leak protein from the blood into the urine. It is described as focal because only some of the glomeruli become scarred (while others remain normal) and segmental as only part of an individual glomerulus is damaged. Over half of all persons with FSGS will develop chronic kidney failure within 10 years. Thus, immunosuppressive strategies are used to control proteinuria and prevent kidney failure. This systematic review identified four studies (108 participants) investigating immunosuppressive treatments for adults with biopsy‐proven FSGS. Adult patients treated with cyclosporin A in combination with prednisone were more likely to achieve partial remission of nephrotic syndrome compared with prednisone alone, however this result is based on only one small study. No data was available on the progression to kidney failure or death.

Lipid‐lowering agents for nephrotic syndrome

Nephrotic syndrome is a relatively rare disease in which the kidneys leak protein into the urine. A common early sign is swelling in the feet and face. Other signs and symptoms of nephrotic syndrome include low levels of protein in the blood, and high levels of fats in the blood, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides.

More about Glomerulosclerosis

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See Also: Glomerulonephritis

Other terms to know:
Glomeruli, Nephrotic Syndrome, Proteinuria

Related articles:
How the Kidneys Work

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