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Steatohepatitis

Excess fat with inflammation and damage in the liver.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Library of Medicine)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

No evidence to support or refute probiotics for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Probiotics have been proposed as a treatment option for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis because of their balancing role on the flora of the gut that may act as a potential source of hepatotoxic oxidative injury. This review did not identify any randomised clinical trials with probiotics in non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis. Even if the results from pilot studies seem promising, randomised clinical trials are necessary to asses the clinical implication of probiotics therapy in non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis.

No evidence to support or refute antioxidant supplements for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease is characterised by fatty deposition in the hepatocytes in the absence of excessive alcohol intake and of other known causes of fatty liver. Hepatic injury might be improved by antioxidant supplements. This systematic review identified six randomised clinical trials. No liver‐related or unrelated deaths occurred in any of the included trials. Adverse events were minor and non‐specific. Treatment with antioxidant supplements showed a significant, though not clinically relevant, amelioration of aspartate aminotransferase, but not of alanine aminotransferase, as compared to placebo or other interventions. Data on the radiological and/or histological response were too limited to draw any conclusions. Further placebo‐controlled trials are necessary.

No evidence to support or refute the effect of bile acids in patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease is a condition characterised by fatty deposition in the hepatocytes in patients with minimal or no alcohol intake. Hepatic injury might be improved by bile acids. This systematic review identified four randomised clinical trials. Bile acids did not cause any liver‐related deaths and were associated with only minor, non‐specific adverse events. However, these agents did not show any significant amelioration of common liver function tests as compared with placebo. Moreover, data on the radiological (ultrasonography and computer tomography scan) and/or histological response were too limited to draw any conclusions. Further randomised placebo‐controlled trials are necessary.

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Summaries for consumers

No evidence to support or refute probiotics for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Probiotics have been proposed as a treatment option for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis because of their balancing role on the flora of the gut that may act as a potential source of hepatotoxic oxidative injury. This review did not identify any randomised clinical trials with probiotics in non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis. Even if the results from pilot studies seem promising, randomised clinical trials are necessary to asses the clinical implication of probiotics therapy in non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis.

No evidence to support or refute antioxidant supplements for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease is characterised by fatty deposition in the hepatocytes in the absence of excessive alcohol intake and of other known causes of fatty liver. Hepatic injury might be improved by antioxidant supplements. This systematic review identified six randomised clinical trials. No liver‐related or unrelated deaths occurred in any of the included trials. Adverse events were minor and non‐specific. Treatment with antioxidant supplements showed a significant, though not clinically relevant, amelioration of aspartate aminotransferase, but not of alanine aminotransferase, as compared to placebo or other interventions. Data on the radiological and/or histological response were too limited to draw any conclusions. Further placebo‐controlled trials are necessary.

No evidence to support or refute the effect of bile acids in patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease is a condition characterised by fatty deposition in the hepatocytes in patients with minimal or no alcohol intake. Hepatic injury might be improved by bile acids. This systematic review identified four randomised clinical trials. Bile acids did not cause any liver‐related deaths and were associated with only minor, non‐specific adverse events. However, these agents did not show any significant amelioration of common liver function tests as compared with placebo. Moreover, data on the radiological (ultrasonography and computer tomography scan) and/or histological response were too limited to draw any conclusions. Further randomised placebo‐controlled trials are necessary.

See all (33)

More about Steatohepatitis

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See Also: Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Other terms to know:
Steatosis (Fatty Liver)

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