Home > Health A – Z > Hyperopia

Hyperopia (Farsightedness)

A disorder of the vision where the eye focuses images behind the retina instead of on it, so that distant objects can be seen better than near objects.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: Wiktionary)

About Hyperopia

Hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, is a common type of refractive error where distant objects may be seen more clearly than objects that are near. However, people experience hyperopia differently. Some people may not notice any problems with their vision, especially when they are young. For people with significant hyperopia, vision can be blurry for objects at any distance, near or far.

How does hyperopia develop?

Hyperopia develops in eyes that focus images behind the retina instead of on the retina, which can result in blurred vision. This occurs when the eyeball is too short, which prevents incoming light from focusing directly on the retina. It may also be caused by an abnormal shape of the cornea or lens.

Read more about Hyperopia NIH - National Eye Institute

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for correction of long‐sightedness

Hyperopia (long‐sightedness or far‐sightedness) is the condition where the relaxed eye brings parallel light to a focus behind the retina instead of on it. In order to correct hyperopia a variety of surgical techniques can be applied including PRK and LASIK. There exists an uncertainty as to which technique provides more accurate, stable and safe results. As no randomised controlled trials were found that met the inclusion criteria, we could not find definite answers to these questions and therefore concluded that more research is required.

Glasses to prevent eye misalignment in far‐sighted children

We compared the benefits and harms of wearing glasses to other interventions in far‐sighted children to prevent the development of eye misalignment.

Efficacy, predictability, and safety of wavefront-guided refractive laser treatment: metaanalysis

PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy, predictability, safety, and induced higher-order aberrations (HOAs) between wavefront-guided and non-wavefront-guided ablations.

See all (8)

Summaries for consumers

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for correction of long‐sightedness

Hyperopia (long‐sightedness or far‐sightedness) is the condition where the relaxed eye brings parallel light to a focus behind the retina instead of on it. In order to correct hyperopia a variety of surgical techniques can be applied including PRK and LASIK. There exists an uncertainty as to which technique provides more accurate, stable and safe results. As no randomised controlled trials were found that met the inclusion criteria, we could not find definite answers to these questions and therefore concluded that more research is required.

Glasses to prevent eye misalignment in far‐sighted children

We compared the benefits and harms of wearing glasses to other interventions in far‐sighted children to prevent the development of eye misalignment.

Presbyopia: Overview

Seeing nearby objects less clearly is a normal part of aging. Known as presbyopia, this typically becomes noticeable in your mid-forties: you have to start holding newspapers or books further away in order to be able to read them. Although there are no effective treatments for the causes of presbyopia, its effects can be corrected.

See all (5)

Terms to know

Cornea
The transparent part of the eye that covers the iris and the pupil and allows light to enter the inside.
Lens in the Eye
A clear disk that focuses light, as in a camera or microscope. In the eye, the lens is a clear, curved structure at the front of the eye behind the pupil. It focuses light rays that enter the eye through the pupil, making an image on the retina (light-sensitive layers of nerve tissue at the back of the eye).
Refractive Error
A defect in the focusing of light on the retina.
Retina
The light-sensitive tissue lining at the back of the eye. The retina converts light into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain through the optic nerve.

More about Hyperopia

Photo of an adult

Also called: Longsighted, Hypermetropia, Far-sightedness, Far-sighted, Far sighted, Hyperopic

Other terms to know: See all 4
Cornea, Lens in the Eye, Refractive Error

Keep up with systematic reviews on Hyperopia:

Create RSS

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...