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Photophobia

A condition in which the eyes are more sensitive than normal to light.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2010 (Kirthi 2010); no new studies were found. A single oral dose of 1000 mg of aspirin reduced pain from moderate or severe to none by two hours in approximately 1 in 4 people (24%) taking aspirin, compared with about 1 in 10 (11%) taking placebo. Pain was reduced from moderate or severe to no worse than mild pain by two hours in roughly 1 in 2 people (52%) taking aspirin compared with approximately 1 in 3 (32%) taking placebo. Of those who experienced effective headache relief at two hours, more had that relief sustained over 24 hours with aspirin than with placebo. Addition of 10 mg of the antiemetic metoclopramide substantially increased relief of nausea and vomiting compared with aspirin alone, but made little difference to pain.

Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

This review found that oral diclofenac potassium 50 mg was an effective treatment for migraine headache, reducing moderate to severe pain to no more than mild pain within two hours in about half (55%) of those treated, to no pain at two hours in about one in five (22%), and to no pain sustained to 24 hours in about the same number (19%). Adverse events were mostly self limiting and of mild or moderate intensity, and were not significantly different from placebo over the short term. Although diclofenac provided good outcomes for some people, almost half did not experience adequate pain relief within two hours, and as few as one in five became pain‐free. It is not clear whether the 100 mg dose provides good outcomes for more people. For those who do not experience adequate responses, a different therapy will be needed.

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine in adults

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 11, 2010 (Derry 2010). New searches identified one additional study for inclusion; this study compared paracetamol with etodolac and did not contribute to any of the analyses in the review.

See all (37)

Summaries for consumers

Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2010 (Kirthi 2010); no new studies were found. A single oral dose of 1000 mg of aspirin reduced pain from moderate or severe to none by two hours in approximately 1 in 4 people (24%) taking aspirin, compared with about 1 in 10 (11%) taking placebo. Pain was reduced from moderate or severe to no worse than mild pain by two hours in roughly 1 in 2 people (52%) taking aspirin compared with approximately 1 in 3 (32%) taking placebo. Of those who experienced effective headache relief at two hours, more had that relief sustained over 24 hours with aspirin than with placebo. Addition of 10 mg of the antiemetic metoclopramide substantially increased relief of nausea and vomiting compared with aspirin alone, but made little difference to pain.

Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

This review found that oral diclofenac potassium 50 mg was an effective treatment for migraine headache, reducing moderate to severe pain to no more than mild pain within two hours in about half (55%) of those treated, to no pain at two hours in about one in five (22%), and to no pain sustained to 24 hours in about the same number (19%). Adverse events were mostly self limiting and of mild or moderate intensity, and were not significantly different from placebo over the short term. Although diclofenac provided good outcomes for some people, almost half did not experience adequate pain relief within two hours, and as few as one in five became pain‐free. It is not clear whether the 100 mg dose provides good outcomes for more people. For those who do not experience adequate responses, a different therapy will be needed.

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine in adults

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 11, 2010 (Derry 2010). New searches identified one additional study for inclusion; this study compared paracetamol with etodolac and did not contribute to any of the analyses in the review.

See all (11)

More about Photophobia

Photo of a young adult

Also called: Light intolerance, Sensitiveness to light

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