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Abdominal Surgery

The term abdominal surgery broadly covers surgical procedures that involve opening the abdomen.

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Crohn's Disease: Management in Adults, Children and Young People

This guideline intends to show the place of both new and established treatments in the wider care pathway for Crohn's disease. This will be useful for clinicians and people with Crohn's disease because new drugs have been licensed for Crohn's disease in the last decade. The guideline also deals with those medications which are unlicensed for treatment of the condition, but which have been used in this way (off-label) for many years and their role is recognised in other NICE documents as well as the British National Formulary. They include azathioprine, mercaptopurine and methotrexate. The guideline aims to help improve the care offered to people with Crohn's disease and provide information about the clinical and cost effectiveness of potential care pathways. Management of Crohn's disease in specific populations (for example, in pregnancy) may require special consideration.

Keyhole (laparoscopic) surgery through the abdomen for treating urinary incontinence in women

Urinary incontinence is a common and often debilitating problem for many women. Around a third of women of child‐bearing age are incontinent during physical exertion or when they cough, laugh or sneeze. When such 'stress' incontinence persists despite non‐surgical treatment, surgery is often recommended.

Minimally invasive surgery compared to open surgery for the treatment of solid tumours located in the chest or the abdomen of children

Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an upcoming new surgical technique. MIS is done through one or more small incisions using a laparoscope or thoracoscope (a thin flexible tube containing a video camera) and surgical instruments. MIS can be used as a diagnostic instrument (i.e. to retrieve tissue samples for a biopsy) and is also used for the resection (i.e. to remove by surgery) of tumours (a lump or growth in a part of the body that is formed from abnormal cells). There is limited experience with the use of MIS for the resection of solid tumours in the chest or abdomen in children.

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Keyhole (laparoscopic) surgery through the abdomen for treating urinary incontinence in women

Urinary incontinence is a common and often debilitating problem for many women. Around a third of women of child‐bearing age are incontinent during physical exertion or when they cough, laugh or sneeze. When such 'stress' incontinence persists despite non‐surgical treatment, surgery is often recommended.

Minimally invasive surgery compared to open surgery for the treatment of solid tumours located in the chest or the abdomen of children

Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an upcoming new surgical technique. MIS is done through one or more small incisions using a laparoscope or thoracoscope (a thin flexible tube containing a video camera) and surgical instruments. MIS can be used as a diagnostic instrument (i.e. to retrieve tissue samples for a biopsy) and is also used for the resection (i.e. to remove by surgery) of tumours (a lump or growth in a part of the body that is formed from abnormal cells). There is limited experience with the use of MIS for the resection of solid tumours in the chest or abdomen in children.

In people undergoing emergency surgery to the chest or abdomen, how effective is transfusing a person's own blood compared with donor blood

Trauma is the leading cause of death in people under the age of 45 years. Over the past 20 years, transfusions using an individual's own blood, salvaged during surgery through a process called 'cell salvage' (also known as intraoperative blood salvage), have been used as an alternative to blood products donated from other individuals (standard care) during surgical procedures. Many people prefer this because of the risk of transfusion‐related infections such as hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from donor blood. In this review, we aimed to determine how effective cell salvage is, compared with usual care, in individuals undergoing abdominal or thoracic (chest) trauma surgery. We considered outcomes including the survival of the individual, their need for extra blood and the costs of this procedure compared with standard care.

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More about Abdominal Surgery

Photo of an adult

Also called: Abdominal operation

Other terms to know:
Laparoscopy

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