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Tachypnea

Rapid breathing.

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(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

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Evidence reviews

Diuretics for transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN)

Background: It is common for full‐term infants born by elective caesarean section to have laboured, rapid breathing (tachypnoea) and to require oxygen for about 48 hours. This transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) is responsible for about half of all cases of neonatal respiratory distress. Although it is transient and not usually serious, the condition requires admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, involves separation of mother and baby, and uses expensive resources. The underlying pathology of TTN is not well understood. The most commonly proposed mechanism is a delay in the resorption of foetal lung fluid after birth. Diuretic medication, including furosemide, may reduce fluid in the lungs.

The use of epinephrine (adrenaline) in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn

Background: Transient tachypnea (abnormally rapid breathing) of the newborn is characterized by high respiratory rate (more than 60 breaths per minute) and signs of respiratory distress (difficulty in breathing); it typically appears within the first two hours of life in infants born at or after 34 weeks' gestational age. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually improves without treatment, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The idea behind using epinephrine for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that medicines called β‐agonists, such as epinephrine, can accelerate the rate of clearance of fluid from small cavities within the lungs called alveoli. This review reported and critically analyzed the available evidence on the effectiveness of epinephrine in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn.

The use of salbutamol (albuterol) in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn

Background: Transient tachypnea (abnormally rapid breathing) of the newborn is characterized by high respiratory rate (more than 60 breaths per minute) and signs of respiratory distress (difficulty in breathing); it typically appears within the first two hours of life in infants born at or after 34 weeks' gestational age. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually improves without treatment, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The idea behind using salbutamol for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that medicines called β‐agonists, such as epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), can accelerate the rate of clearance of fluid from small cavities within the lungs called the alveoli. This review reported and critically analyzed the available evidence on the effectiveness of salbutamol in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn.

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Summaries for consumers

Diuretics for transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN)

Background: It is common for full‐term infants born by elective caesarean section to have laboured, rapid breathing (tachypnoea) and to require oxygen for about 48 hours. This transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) is responsible for about half of all cases of neonatal respiratory distress. Although it is transient and not usually serious, the condition requires admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, involves separation of mother and baby, and uses expensive resources. The underlying pathology of TTN is not well understood. The most commonly proposed mechanism is a delay in the resorption of foetal lung fluid after birth. Diuretic medication, including furosemide, may reduce fluid in the lungs.

The use of epinephrine (adrenaline) in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn

Background: Transient tachypnea (abnormally rapid breathing) of the newborn is characterized by high respiratory rate (more than 60 breaths per minute) and signs of respiratory distress (difficulty in breathing); it typically appears within the first two hours of life in infants born at or after 34 weeks' gestational age. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually improves without treatment, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The idea behind using epinephrine for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that medicines called β‐agonists, such as epinephrine, can accelerate the rate of clearance of fluid from small cavities within the lungs called alveoli. This review reported and critically analyzed the available evidence on the effectiveness of epinephrine in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn.

The use of salbutamol (albuterol) in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn

Background: Transient tachypnea (abnormally rapid breathing) of the newborn is characterized by high respiratory rate (more than 60 breaths per minute) and signs of respiratory distress (difficulty in breathing); it typically appears within the first two hours of life in infants born at or after 34 weeks' gestational age. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually improves without treatment, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The idea behind using salbutamol for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that medicines called β‐agonists, such as epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), can accelerate the rate of clearance of fluid from small cavities within the lungs called the alveoli. This review reported and critically analyzed the available evidence on the effectiveness of salbutamol in the management of transient tachypnea of the newborn.

See all (9)

More about Tachypnea

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Also called: Tachypnoea, Tachypneic, Tachypnoeic

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