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Adjustable Gastric Band

A laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, commonly called a lap-band, A band, or LAGB, is an inflatable silicone device placed around the top portion of the stomach to treat obesity, intended to slow consumption of food and thus reduce the amount of food consumed.

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Deflation of gastric band balloon in pregnancy for improving outcomes

Obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy are associated with poor outcomes for mother and baby. These include gestational diabetes, raised blood pressure (hypertension) in pregnancy, maternal venous blood clots (thromboembolism), delivery by caesarean section, high birthweight, stillbirth, maternal infection (sepsis), heavy maternal bleeding (haemorrhage) after delivery, and maternal death. As the number of women of childbearing age who are obese has increased so too has the number of women of childbearing age undergoing bariatric (weight‐loss) surgery. This has resulted in an increased number of pregnant women with a history of weight‐loss surgery. The most common bariatric procedure is gastric banding (laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding) in which a band containing a fluid‐filled balloon is placed around the upper portion of the stomach creating a small upper pouch which limits transport of food into the lower pouch. This reduces a person's capacity to ingest food and so reduces nutritional intake. The volume of the balloon can be adjusted by addition to or removal of fluid from the balloon.

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as revisional procedure after adjustable gastric band – a systematic review

The adjustable gastric band (L)AGB gained popularity as a weight loss procedure. However, long-term results are disappointing; many patients need revision to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The purpose of this study was to assess morbidity, mortality, and results of these two revisional procedures. Fifteen LRYGB studies with a total of 588 patients and eight LSG studies with 286 patients were included. The reason for revision was insufficient weight loss or weight regain in 62.2 and 63.9% in LRYGB and LSG patients. Short-term complications occurred in 8.5 and 15.7% and long-term complications in 8.9 and 2.5%. Reoperation was performed in 6.5 and 3.5%. Revision to LRYGB or LSG after (L)AGB is feasible and relatively safe. Complication rate is higher than in primary procedures.

Systematic review of same-day laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery

Laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) is the commonest bariatric procedure worldwide. The safety and feasibility of same-day discharge after LAGB has not been reviewed before. The aim of this study is to review the published literature on same-day LAGB. Systematic search was performed in Medline, Embase and Cochrane library using the medical subjects headings terms "ambulatory surgical procedures" and "bariatric surgery" with further free-text search and cross-references. All articles on same-day LAGB which described patient selection criteria, same-day discharge and complications were reviewed. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. One randomized controlled trial and five cohort studies were included in this review. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 73 years, body mass index ranged from 32.7 to 79 and ASA grade ranged from 1 to 3; 2534 out of 2549 (99.41%) patients could be discharged on the same day. Pain, nausea and dysphagia were the commonest causes for overnight admission. Two out of the six studies reported that 1,982 out of 1984 (99.9%) could be discharged within 23 h; 34 out of 2549 (1.33%) patients developed early complications. No deaths have been reported in these studies. Five out of the six studies mentioned that 12 out of 2,181 patients (0.55%) were readmitted. Dysphagia was the main reason for re-admission. LAGB is safe and feasible as a same-day procedure in selected patients. Early complications and re-admissions are infrequent.

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Summaries for consumers

Deflation of gastric band balloon in pregnancy for improving outcomes

Obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy are associated with poor outcomes for mother and baby. These include gestational diabetes, raised blood pressure (hypertension) in pregnancy, maternal venous blood clots (thromboembolism), delivery by caesarean section, high birthweight, stillbirth, maternal infection (sepsis), heavy maternal bleeding (haemorrhage) after delivery, and maternal death. As the number of women of childbearing age who are obese has increased so too has the number of women of childbearing age undergoing bariatric (weight‐loss) surgery. This has resulted in an increased number of pregnant women with a history of weight‐loss surgery. The most common bariatric procedure is gastric banding (laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding) in which a band containing a fluid‐filled balloon is placed around the upper portion of the stomach creating a small upper pouch which limits transport of food into the lower pouch. This reduces a person's capacity to ingest food and so reduces nutritional intake. The volume of the balloon can be adjusted by addition to or removal of fluid from the balloon.

Surgery for the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents

Across the world more children and adolescents are becoming overweight and obese. As overweight and obese children are more likely to suffer from health problems, more information is needed about how best to treat this problem.

Surgery for obesity

Obesity is associated with many health problems and a higher risk of death. Bariatric surgery for obesity is usually only considered when other treatments have failed. We aimed to compare surgical interventions with non‐surgical interventions for obesity (such as drugs, diet and exercise) and to compare different surgical procedures. Bariatric surgery can be considered for people with a body mass index (BMI = kg/m²) greater than 40, or for those with a BMI less than 40 and obesity‐related diseases such as diabetes.

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Also called: Laparoscopic adjustable band, Lap-band, A band, Gastric banding, LAGB

Other terms to know:
Laparoscope

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