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Gastrectomy

An operation to remove all or part of the stomach.

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(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Inserting a drain after gastrectomy for gastric cancer

Gastrectomy remains the primary therapeutic method for resectable gastric cancer. It is believed that abdominal drains can help in the earlier detection and drainage of anastomotic fistulas and the prevention of intra‐abdominal abscesses. There is no consensus on the routine placement of abdominal drainage after gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

Meta-analysis of total gastrectomy and splenectomy in advanced gastric cancer

Bibliographic details: Li P, He XD, Tian JH, Yang KH, Jiang L.  Meta-analysis of total gastrectomy and splenectomy in advanced gastric cancer. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2009; 17(12): 1241-1246

Laparoscopy versus open distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Inokuchi M, Kojima K, Kato K, Sugita H, Sugihara K.  Laparoscopy versus open distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques 2014; 23: 1-724743677

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Summaries for consumers

Inserting a drain after gastrectomy for gastric cancer

Gastrectomy remains the primary therapeutic method for resectable gastric cancer. It is believed that abdominal drains can help in the earlier detection and drainage of anastomotic fistulas and the prevention of intra‐abdominal abscesses. There is no consensus on the routine placement of abdominal drainage after gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

Endoscopic mucosal resection for early stomach cancer

There is a lack of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is compared with surgery for early stomach cancer. There is a need for well‐designed randomised controlled trials to determine the effects of EMR compared to gastrectomy.

Laparoscopic (key hole) operation versus open operation for treatment of people with stomach cancer

Stomach cancer is the third most frequent cause of cancer‐related death in the world. If cancer has not spread to other areas of the body, and if the person can withstand a major operation, depending upon the part of the stomach involved, removal of part of the stomach, or the entire stomach (gastrectomy), is the only treatment that offers long‐term cure of cancer. Gastrectomy can be performed by laparoscopic (key hole) operation, or by open operation, which involves a large cut. While the cut is smaller with key hole surgery, it is not clear whether key hole surgery is as safe as open surgery, and whether it offers any advantages in terms of quicker recovery of people undergoing gastrectomy. We sought to resolve this issue by searching the medical literature for studies reported until September 2015 that compared laparoscopic and open gastrectomy in people with stomach cancer.

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More about Gastrectomy

Photo of an adult

Also called: Gastric resection

See Also: Gastric Cancer, Bariatric Surgery

Other terms to know:
Gastric, Sleeve Gastrectomy

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