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Posaconazole (By injection)

Treats or prevents fungus infections.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Posaconazole injection is used to prevent certain fungus (yeast) infections in patients who have a weakened immune system (eg, hematopoietic stem cell transplant or HSCT recipients, or patients with blood cancers). This medicine is to be given only by or under the direct supervision of a doctor… Read more
Brand names include
Noxafil
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Antifungal

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Posaconazole for the Treatment or Prophylaxis of Aspergillosis or Candidiasis: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines [Internet]

The purpose of this Rapid Response report is to review the clinical effectiveness and evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of posaconazole for the treatment or prophylaxis of aspergillosis or candidiasis.

Interventions for the prevention and management of oral thrush associated with HIV infection in adults and children

Oral candidiasis (thrush) associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection occurs commonly and recurs frequently, often presenting as an initial manifestation of the disease. Interventions aimed at preventing and treating HIV‐associated oral thrush form an integral component of maintaining the quality of life for affected individuals. This review evaluated the effects of interventions in preventing or treating oral thrush in children and adults with HIV infection. Thirty three trials (n=3445) were included. Twenty two trials investigated treatment and eleven trials investigate prevention. There was no difference with regard to clinical cure between fluconazole compared to ketoconazole, itraconazole, clotrimazole and posaconazole. Fluconazole, gentian violet and ketoconazole were superior to nystatin. Compared to placebo and no treatment, fluconazole was effective in preventing clinical episodes from occurring. Continuous fluconazole was better than intermittent treatment. Insufficient evidence was found to come to any conclusion about the effectiveness of clotrimazole, nystatin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole or chlorhexidine with regard to OC prophylaxis.

Addendum to Haematological Cancers: Improving Outcomes (Update)

Different levels of service are needed to manage haematological cancers, depending on the particular cancer in question. Because of the increased complexity of care and changes in the levels of care from those specified in the 2003 NICE cancer service guidance on improving outcomes in haematological cancers, an update was needed.

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Summaries for consumers

Interventions for the prevention and management of oral thrush associated with HIV infection in adults and children

Oral candidiasis (thrush) associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection occurs commonly and recurs frequently, often presenting as an initial manifestation of the disease. Interventions aimed at preventing and treating HIV‐associated oral thrush form an integral component of maintaining the quality of life for affected individuals. This review evaluated the effects of interventions in preventing or treating oral thrush in children and adults with HIV infection. Thirty three trials (n=3445) were included. Twenty two trials investigated treatment and eleven trials investigate prevention. There was no difference with regard to clinical cure between fluconazole compared to ketoconazole, itraconazole, clotrimazole and posaconazole. Fluconazole, gentian violet and ketoconazole were superior to nystatin. Compared to placebo and no treatment, fluconazole was effective in preventing clinical episodes from occurring. Continuous fluconazole was better than intermittent treatment. Insufficient evidence was found to come to any conclusion about the effectiveness of clotrimazole, nystatin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole or chlorhexidine with regard to OC prophylaxis.

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