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Zafirlukast (By mouth)

Treats asthma and prevents asthma attacks.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Zafirlukast is used to help control the symptoms of asthma and improve lung function. However, this medicine should not be used to relieve an asthma attack that has already started. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Accolate
Drug classes About this
Anti-Inflammatory

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Does zafirlukast reduce future risk of asthma exacerbations in adults? Systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The purpose of asthma management is to achieve a total asthma control that involves current control and future risk. It has proven efficacy in reducing asthma exacerbations, but the effect size of zafirlukast for asthma exacerbations of various severity is not systematically explored.

Leukotriene receptor antagonists for non‐cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

Leukotriene receptor antagonists are a new class of drug which may have an anti‐inflammatory action in some patients with asthma. In theory they may also be of benefit in bronchiectasis, but no randomised controlled trials have yet been reported so it is not possible to make a recommendation about their use in this condition.

Drug Class Review: Newer Antihistamines: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Antihistamines inhibit the effects of histamine at H1 receptors. They have a number of clinical indications including allergic conditions (e.g., rhinitis, dermatoses, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, allergic conjunctivitis, hypersensitivity reactions to drugs, mild transfusion reactions, and urticaria), chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), motion sickness, vertigo, and insomnia.

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Summaries for consumers

Leukotriene receptor antagonists for non‐cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

Leukotriene receptor antagonists are a new class of drug which may have an anti‐inflammatory action in some patients with asthma. In theory they may also be of benefit in bronchiectasis, but no randomised controlled trials have yet been reported so it is not possible to make a recommendation about their use in this condition.

Is adding an anti‐leukotriene to an inhaled corticosteroid better than using an inhaled corticosteroid alone for persistent asthma?

Background: A daily low dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is the recommended first preventer treatment offered to adults and teenagers with asthma. Patients with inadequate asthma control are often treated by adding an anti‐leukotriene (LTRA) or a long‐acting β2‐agonist, or by increasing the dose of ICS.

Effects of long‐acting beta2‐agonists compared with anti‐leukotrienes when added to inhaled corticosteroids?

People who continue to experience asthma symptoms despite regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) represent an asthma management challenge. The addition of a long‐acting beta2‐agonist (LABA) and the addition of an oral anti‐leukotriene (LTRA) are two therapeutic options.

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