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Vidarabine (Into the eye)

Treats virus infections of the eye. Also called ara-A and arabinoside.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Vidarabine ophthalmic preparations are used to treat virus infections of the eye. Vidarabine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Vira-A
Drug classes About this
Antiviral

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Antiviral agents for treatment of herpes simplex virus infection in neonates

The virus herpes simplex (herpes) causes a rare but devastating disease in the newborn that can range from skin and eye infection to shock, organ failure, brain infection, and death. Newborn herpes infection is an uncommon complication of active genital herpes in the mother around the time of delivery or after direct contact with a herpes blister ("fever blister", "cold sore") of an infected caregiver. We reviewed five studies conducted to assess the effects of antiviral agents (medications that reduce the spread of virus in the body) on mortality and long‐term complications of herpes disease in the newborn. Antiviral agents were shown to reduce mortality from the condition, but the reduction was not statistically significant due to the small number of infants in the study. There was insufficient trial data to guide caregivers regarding the duration of antiviral therapy or dose.

Alkylating agents for Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia

Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia (WM) is an uncommon B‐cell lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by bone marrow infiltration and production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. It is a kind of non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma which can lead to death. Alkylating agents are believed to be effective in treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia for alleviating symptoms and elongating survival time. The review authors found one randomised controlled trial with 92 participants that considered fludarabine was superior to the alkylating agents‐containing regimen for pretreated/relapsed patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia.

Purine Antagonists for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

Despite increasing insight into its tumour biology B‐CLL remains an incurable disease. So far, chemotherapy with alkylating agents such as chlorambucil has been the mainstay of treatment in B‐CLL. However, purine antagonists such as fludarabine are increasingly being used, as it has been suggested that these novel drugs are more effective. This review confirms the greater response rates achievable by using purine antagonists but at the cost of greater toxicity, mainly infections. There is inconclusive evidence whether treatment with purine antagonists improves survival. None of the studies included quality of life data. More research is needed to fully explore the role of purine antagonists in the treatment of B‐CLL and their potential impact on survival.

See all (16)

Summaries for consumers

Antiviral agents for treatment of herpes simplex virus infection in neonates

The virus herpes simplex (herpes) causes a rare but devastating disease in the newborn that can range from skin and eye infection to shock, organ failure, brain infection, and death. Newborn herpes infection is an uncommon complication of active genital herpes in the mother around the time of delivery or after direct contact with a herpes blister ("fever blister", "cold sore") of an infected caregiver. We reviewed five studies conducted to assess the effects of antiviral agents (medications that reduce the spread of virus in the body) on mortality and long‐term complications of herpes disease in the newborn. Antiviral agents were shown to reduce mortality from the condition, but the reduction was not statistically significant due to the small number of infants in the study. There was insufficient trial data to guide caregivers regarding the duration of antiviral therapy or dose.

Alkylating agents for Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia

Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia (WM) is an uncommon B‐cell lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by bone marrow infiltration and production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. It is a kind of non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma which can lead to death. Alkylating agents are believed to be effective in treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia for alleviating symptoms and elongating survival time. The review authors found one randomised controlled trial with 92 participants that considered fludarabine was superior to the alkylating agents‐containing regimen for pretreated/relapsed patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia.

Purine Antagonists for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

Despite increasing insight into its tumour biology B‐CLL remains an incurable disease. So far, chemotherapy with alkylating agents such as chlorambucil has been the mainstay of treatment in B‐CLL. However, purine antagonists such as fludarabine are increasingly being used, as it has been suggested that these novel drugs are more effective. This review confirms the greater response rates achievable by using purine antagonists but at the cost of greater toxicity, mainly infections. There is inconclusive evidence whether treatment with purine antagonists improves survival. None of the studies included quality of life data. More research is needed to fully explore the role of purine antagonists in the treatment of B‐CLL and their potential impact on survival.

See all (7)

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