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Venlafaxine is used to treat depression. It is also used to treat general anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder. Venlafaxine belongs to a group of medicines known as serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI). These medicines are thought to work by increasing the activity of a chemical called serotonin in the brain. This medicine is available only with your… Read more
Brand names include
Effexor, Effexor XR, Effexor-XR, Venlafaxine HCl AvPak
Drug classes About this
Antidepressant

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Venlafaxine for neuropathic pain in adults

Neuropathic pain is pain that arises from damaged nerves. It is different in nature than pain that arises from damaged tissue, such as a cut, although that type of pain is also carried along nerves. Drugs that are commonly used to treat pain, such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, or morphine, are not very good at treating neuropathic pain. However, other drugs, such as gabapentin, which are also used to prevent or treat epilepsy (fits), do appear to be of some benefit in treating neuropathic pain. There is also a great deal of interest in using antidepressant drugs to treat neuropathic pain. This does not imply that the person with neuropathic pain is depressed, but simply that these drugs may have benefits in neuropathic pain. However, while some doctors prescribe antidepressants in people with neuropathic pain, their benefits have not been confirmed in large clinical trials.

Citalopram versus other antidepressants for depression

Major depression is a severe mental illness characterised by a persistent and unreactive low mood and loss of all interest and pleasure, usually accompanied by a range of symptoms including appetite change, sleep disturbance, fatigue, loss of energy, poor concentration, psychomotor symptoms, inappropriate guilt and morbid thoughts of death. Antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment in moderate‐to‐severe major depression. During the last 20 years, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have progressively become the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Citalopram, one of the first SSRIs introduced in the market, is the racemic mixture of S‐ and R‐enantiomer. In the present review we assessed the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of citalopram in comparison with all other antidepressants in the acute‐phase treatment of major depression. Thirty‐seven randomised controlled trials (more than 6000 participants) were included in the present review. In terms of efficacy, citalopram was more efficacious than other reference compounds like paroxetine or reboxetine, but worse than escitalopram. In terms of side effects, citalopram was more acceptable than older antidepressants, like tricyclics. Based on these findings, we conclude that clinicians should focus on practical or clinically relevant considerations including differences in efficacy and side‐effect profiles.

Mirtazapine versus other antidepressive agents for depression

Major depression is characterised by a persistent low mood and loss of interest and pleasure. These symptoms are often accompanied by loss of appetite, insomnia, fatigue, poor concentration, inappropriate guilty feelings and even suicide. Depression was the third leading cause of disease burden among all diseases experienced by humankind in 2002. Antidepressants are used in treatment for major depression. They are the mainstay of treatment. Among them, mirtazapine is known to have a unique pharmacological profile and thus is supposed to differ in its efficacy and adverse effects profile in comparison with other antidepressants.

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Summaries for consumers

Venlafaxine for neuropathic pain in adults

Neuropathic pain is pain that arises from damaged nerves. It is different in nature than pain that arises from damaged tissue, such as a cut, although that type of pain is also carried along nerves. Drugs that are commonly used to treat pain, such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, or morphine, are not very good at treating neuropathic pain. However, other drugs, such as gabapentin, which are also used to prevent or treat epilepsy (fits), do appear to be of some benefit in treating neuropathic pain. There is also a great deal of interest in using antidepressant drugs to treat neuropathic pain. This does not imply that the person with neuropathic pain is depressed, but simply that these drugs may have benefits in neuropathic pain. However, while some doctors prescribe antidepressants in people with neuropathic pain, their benefits have not been confirmed in large clinical trials.

Citalopram versus other antidepressants for depression

Major depression is a severe mental illness characterised by a persistent and unreactive low mood and loss of all interest and pleasure, usually accompanied by a range of symptoms including appetite change, sleep disturbance, fatigue, loss of energy, poor concentration, psychomotor symptoms, inappropriate guilt and morbid thoughts of death. Antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment in moderate‐to‐severe major depression. During the last 20 years, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have progressively become the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Citalopram, one of the first SSRIs introduced in the market, is the racemic mixture of S‐ and R‐enantiomer. In the present review we assessed the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of citalopram in comparison with all other antidepressants in the acute‐phase treatment of major depression. Thirty‐seven randomised controlled trials (more than 6000 participants) were included in the present review. In terms of efficacy, citalopram was more efficacious than other reference compounds like paroxetine or reboxetine, but worse than escitalopram. In terms of side effects, citalopram was more acceptable than older antidepressants, like tricyclics. Based on these findings, we conclude that clinicians should focus on practical or clinically relevant considerations including differences in efficacy and side‐effect profiles.

Mirtazapine versus other antidepressive agents for depression

Major depression is characterised by a persistent low mood and loss of interest and pleasure. These symptoms are often accompanied by loss of appetite, insomnia, fatigue, poor concentration, inappropriate guilty feelings and even suicide. Depression was the third leading cause of disease burden among all diseases experienced by humankind in 2002. Antidepressants are used in treatment for major depression. They are the mainstay of treatment. Among them, mirtazapine is known to have a unique pharmacological profile and thus is supposed to differ in its efficacy and adverse effects profile in comparison with other antidepressants.

See all (25)

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