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Trihexyphenidyl Hydrochloride (By mouth)

Treats symptoms of Parkinson's disease or side effects of other drugs.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Trihexyphenidyl is used alone or together with other medicines (e.g., levodopa) to treat Parkinson's disease. By improving muscle control and reducing stiffness, this medicine allows more normal movements of the body as the disease symptoms are reduced. Trihexyphenidyl is also used to control severe muscle reactions and other side effects from certain medicines that are used to treat severe nauseaRead more
Brand names include
Artane, Trihexane, Tritane
Drug classes About this
Antiparkinsonian

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

BtA injections provide more objective and subjective benefit than trihexyphenidyl to patients with cervical dystonia.

Cervical dystonia is characterized by involuntary posturing of the head and frequently is associated with neck pain. Disability and social withdrawal are common. Botulinum toxin Type A (BtA) is now the first line therapy but previously anticholinergics were the most widely accepted treatment. This review demonstrated that BtA injections are better than trihexyphenidyl, reduce involuntary muscular movements and tremor, reduce pain, and have fewer adverse effects as measured by objective scales and subjectively by patients.

Interventions for eye movement disorders in people with stroke

Eye movement disorders may affect over 70% of stroke patients and can make it difficult to keep both eyes in their normal position when looking straight ahead, or can make it difficult to move the eyes accurately to look in a different direction. This can affect patients' perception of depth, makes it difficult for them to take in their whole surroundings and can severely affect the ability to read. We found only two randomised controlled trials which investigated treatments for eye movement disorders. Both of these studies investigated the effect of drug treatments. A total of 28 participants were included but only five of these were people with stroke. One study found that the people with stroke responded differently to the drug treatment than people who had eye movement disorders due to other conditions. These studies provide too little evidence from which to reach any conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions for patients with eye movement disorders after stroke. Further research is urgently required.

Spasticity in Children and Young People with Non-Progressive Brain Disorders: Management of Spasticity and Co-Existing Motor Disorders and Their Early Musculoskeletal Complications

This guideline covers the management of spasticity and co-existing motor disorders and their early musculoskeletal complications in children and young people (from birth up to their 19th birthday) with non-progressive brain disorders.

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Summaries for consumers

BtA injections provide more objective and subjective benefit than trihexyphenidyl to patients with cervical dystonia.

Cervical dystonia is characterized by involuntary posturing of the head and frequently is associated with neck pain. Disability and social withdrawal are common. Botulinum toxin Type A (BtA) is now the first line therapy but previously anticholinergics were the most widely accepted treatment. This review demonstrated that BtA injections are better than trihexyphenidyl, reduce involuntary muscular movements and tremor, reduce pain, and have fewer adverse effects as measured by objective scales and subjectively by patients.

Interventions for eye movement disorders in people with stroke

Eye movement disorders may affect over 70% of stroke patients and can make it difficult to keep both eyes in their normal position when looking straight ahead, or can make it difficult to move the eyes accurately to look in a different direction. This can affect patients' perception of depth, makes it difficult for them to take in their whole surroundings and can severely affect the ability to read. We found only two randomised controlled trials which investigated treatments for eye movement disorders. Both of these studies investigated the effect of drug treatments. A total of 28 participants were included but only five of these were people with stroke. One study found that the people with stroke responded differently to the drug treatment than people who had eye movement disorders due to other conditions. These studies provide too little evidence from which to reach any conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions for patients with eye movement disorders after stroke. Further research is urgently required.

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