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Tobramycin (Into the eye)

Treats eye infections. Belongs to a class of drugs called antibiotics.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Ophthalmic tobramycin is used in the eye to treat bacterial infections of the eye. Tobramycin works by killing bacteria. Ophthalmic tobramycin may be used alone or with other medicines for eye infections. Either the drops or the ointment form of this medicine may be used alone during the day. In addition, both forms may be used together, with the drops being used during the day and the ointment… Read more
Brand names include
AKTob, Apo-Tobramycin, Sab-Tobramycin, Tobrasol, Tobrex, Tomycine
Other forms
By breathing, By injection
Drug classes About this
Antibiotic
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Colistimethate sodium powder and tobramycin powder for inhalation for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis: systematic review and economic model

Study found that both colistimethate sodium dry powder for inhalation (DPI) and tobramycin DPI were non-inferior to nebulised tobramycin for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis, and their cost-effectiveness was uncertain.

Nebulisers for giving medication in cystic fibrosis

Nebulisers change a liquid medication into a mist so it can be breathed in. There are different types of nebuliser systems and no review has yet considered whether any nebuliser is better than another.

Systematic review of the dry powder inhalers colistimethate sodium and tobramycin in cystic fibrosis

This systematic review evaluated evidence for two dry powder formulations, colistimethate sodium and tobramycin, for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis, as part of the UK national recommendation process for new technologies. Electronic bibliographic databases were searched in May 2012 (MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-Process, EMBASE, Cochrane Library databases, CINAHL, Web of Science, Conference Proceedings Citation Index and BIOSIS Previews). Relevant outcomes included rate and extent of microbial response (e.g. sputum density of P. aeruginosa), lung function (e.g. forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)), frequency, severity of acute exacerbations and adverse events. Three trials were included, and both dry powder formulations were reported to be non-inferior in the short term to nebulised tobramycin for FEV1. However, long-term follow-up data were missing and the effect on exacerbation rates was not always reported. Whilst short-term results showed that both dry powder drugs were non-inferior to nebulised tobramycin, there was no long-term follow-up and no phase 3 trials compared nebulised and dry powder colistimethate sodium. The use of FEV1 as the primary end-point may not accurately represent changes in lung health. This review illustrates the difficulty in assessing new technologies where the evidence base is poor.

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Summaries for consumers

Nebulisers for giving medication in cystic fibrosis

Nebulisers change a liquid medication into a mist so it can be breathed in. There are different types of nebuliser systems and no review has yet considered whether any nebuliser is better than another.

Inhaling antibiotics to treat temporary worsening of lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a serious genetic disorder that results in abnormal mucus in several parts of the body. In the lungs the abnormal mucus is linked to the likelihood of repeated infection. A pulmonary exacerbation is when symptoms become more severe, mostly due to more worsening infection. Antibiotics are an essential part of treatment and may be given in different ways, one of these is by inhaling the drug. We wanted to learn if this type of treatment improved general health and which method of giving antibiotics was best. We found there have been only six trials with a total of 208 people which compared inhaled antibiotics to intravenous antibiotics for treating pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis. The results of these trials did not allow us to answer our question. We are not able to show from these trials if inhaled antibiotics are useful for treating pulmonary exacerbations.

Giving aminoglycoside antibiotics intravenously once daily compared to giving them several times per day in people with cystic fibrosis

We looked for evidence to show the differences between giving intravenous antibiotics once daily compared to giving them several times a day when treating flare ups of disease (pulmonary exacerbations) in people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of an earlier review.

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