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Tiagabine (By mouth)

Treats seizures.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Tiagabine is used to help control some types of seizures in the treatment of epilepsy. This medicine cannot cure epilepsy and will only work to control seizures for as long as you continue to take it. Tiagabine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Gabitril
Drug classes About this
Anticonvulsant

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Tiagabine to treat acute affective episodes in bipolar disorder

This systematic review investigated the evidence base for the efficacy and acceptability of tiagabine compared to placebo and other pharmacological agents in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder. No randomised controlled trials were found. Currently, there is insufficient evidence on which to base any recommendations regarding the use of tiagabine in acute treatment of bipolar illness, either as a single treatment or as an additional treatment. A significant proportion of patients suffered episodes of syncope or seizure. There is a need for randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy and acceptability of tiagabine in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder, after the nature of these episodes has been clarified.

Tiagabine add‐on for drug‐resistant partial epilepsy

Epilepsy is a disorder in which recurrent seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges from the brain. Most seizures can be controlled by a single antiepileptic drug (AED); this approach is known as monotherapy. Unfortunately, some people require more than one antiepileptic drug to control their seizures, especially if these originate from one area of the brain (partial epilepsy), instead of being generalised.

Tiagabine in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder

People with bipolar disorder suffer from repeated episodes of severe mood disturbance. These can vary from mania to severe depression.  Sometimes manic and depressive symptoms can occur at the same time. Episodes may also fluctuate frequently, so‐called 'rapid cycling'. Periods of normal mood and function may occur in between these episodes, but this is not always the case.

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Summaries for consumers

Tiagabine to treat acute affective episodes in bipolar disorder

This systematic review investigated the evidence base for the efficacy and acceptability of tiagabine compared to placebo and other pharmacological agents in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder. No randomised controlled trials were found. Currently, there is insufficient evidence on which to base any recommendations regarding the use of tiagabine in acute treatment of bipolar illness, either as a single treatment or as an additional treatment. A significant proportion of patients suffered episodes of syncope or seizure. There is a need for randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy and acceptability of tiagabine in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder, after the nature of these episodes has been clarified.

Tiagabine add‐on for drug‐resistant partial epilepsy

Epilepsy is a disorder in which recurrent seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges from the brain. Most seizures can be controlled by a single antiepileptic drug (AED); this approach is known as monotherapy. Unfortunately, some people require more than one antiepileptic drug to control their seizures, especially if these originate from one area of the brain (partial epilepsy), instead of being generalised.

Tiagabine in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder

People with bipolar disorder suffer from repeated episodes of severe mood disturbance. These can vary from mania to severe depression.  Sometimes manic and depressive symptoms can occur at the same time. Episodes may also fluctuate frequently, so‐called 'rapid cycling'. Periods of normal mood and function may occur in between these episodes, but this is not always the case.

See all (8)

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