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Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate (By injection)

Treats small varicose veins of the lower legs.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Sodium tetradecyl sulfate is a type of medicine called a sclerosing agent. It is used for the treatment of small varicose veins of the lower extremities. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Sotradecol
Drug classes About this
Sclerosing Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Sclerotherapy (injection techniques) for spider veins on the legs

Sclerotherapy has been used for centuries to treat spider veins. The technique involves the injection of a chemical into the veins. This is sometimes followed by compression with bandages or stockings.

Efficacy and safety of endovenous foam sclerotherapy: meta-analysis for treatment of venous disorders

AIM: Endovenous foam sclerotherapy (EFS) is used widely throughout the USA for the treatment of venous disorders. The purpose of the quantitative meta-analysis was to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the literature to provide accurate estimates of safety and efficacy outcomes for this procedure.

Varicose Veins in the Legs: The Diagnosis and Management of Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are dilated, often palpable subcutaneous veins with reversed blood flow, most commonly found in the legs. Estimates of the prevalence of varicose veins vary. Visible varicose veins in the lower limbs are estimated to affect at least a third of the population. There is little reliable information available in the literature on the proportion of people with varicose veins who progress to venous ulceration. One study reported that 28.6% of those who had visible varicose veins without oedema or other complications progressed to more serious venous disease after 6.6 years.83 However there was no information about the numbers progressing to ulceration. Other data on the lifetime prevalence of varicose veins estimate that approximately 3–6% of people who have varicose veins in their lifetime will develop venous ulcers.71 Risk factors for developing varicose veins are unclear although prevalence rises with age and they often develop during pregnancy. In some people varicose veins are asymptomatic or cause only mild symptoms, but in others they cause pain, aching or itching and can have a significant effect on their quality of life. Varicose veins may become more severe over time and can lead to complications such as changes in skin pigmentation, eczema, superficial thrombophlebitis, bleeding, loss of subcutaneous tissue, lipodermatosclerosis or venous ulceration.

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Summaries for consumers

Sclerotherapy (injection techniques) for spider veins on the legs

Sclerotherapy has been used for centuries to treat spider veins. The technique involves the injection of a chemical into the veins. This is sometimes followed by compression with bandages or stockings.

Injection sclerotherapy for varicose veins

Varicose veins are enlarged, visibly lumpy knotted veins, usually in the legs. They can cause pain, burning discomfort, aching and itching as well as generalised aching, heaviness or swelling in the legs, cramps at night and restless leg syndrome. There is also little correlation between these symptoms and the extent or size of the varicose veins which, like minor venous abnormalities thread veins or venous flares, can be cosmetically unattractive. Wearing graduated compression stockings is one treatment option.

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